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Category: 2015 (page 1 of 9)

Holds movie reviews from the year 2015

Parched Review (2015) | Empowers Indian Women to Take a Stand

In a parochial world of male-chauvinism, parched stay the women. Parched for a little place in the world. Parched for teensy droplets of hope in a male dominant society. A rustic village of feeble minds constantly gnaws at them, laughs brazenly at their winds of change. But despite everything that stands against them, a coterie of three friends take on the challenge, defying dams that have them bound.


Parched wades beautifully into ballsy waters of change. A lot of times it goes lewd in doing so, but if you really look at it, you can’t help but think why is it alright in India to show just men being obscene? Why does it bother Indian men when they see women act like them? Why can’t they stand a sordid joke if it emanates from a woman’s mouth? If you try to reason with it, suddenly every coarse gesture becomes nothing but a mere hue of naughty.

still of Parched movie village head

One of the most appalling moments of Parched lurks right at the beginning. An unfortunate woman tries escaping the indecency levied upon her in her wedded land. She has taken recluse in her mother’s bosoms, but even so is brought under the gavel by her ugly community. The judge being one of those old inane fellas who, instead of doing what is right, bluntly orders her to go back.

What is even more nerve-racking is the fact that even when she confesses everything in front of her mother, she stands their motionless, emotionless as if the concept of injustice to women is an accepted way of living. It literally rips your heart apart when you watch her being taken as she looks at her helpless mother in tears of wrath and hatred. As if speaking,

“How could you let them take me?”


For its primal plot, we have a prostitute named Bijli played convincingly well by Surveen Chawla who brushes off her defiance on her insular friends. She tries to show them what a good time is all about. Her freedom is eloquent in a progressive way, and if it were not for her, life would have been really punishing for her childhood friend Rani, a widow played superbly by Tannishtha Chatterjee, and Lajjo played extraordinarily well by Radhika Apte. The latter is a woman caught in the abominable clutches of domestic violence. The presence of Bijli in their lives gives them so much to catch up on that they forget all about the myopic vision of their parched land ephemerally.

still of Tannishtha Chatterjee as rani in parched movie


Along with several havocking subplots in the tale of Parched, the major one stays concentrated around Rani. We see her rustic world with her stinted eyes, where it is considered a disgrace if women cut their hair short. On her way to marry her son Gulab played exceptionally by Riddhi Sen, who by the way is picking up all the wrong things that their short-sighted world has, she comes across the reticent Janaki (Lehar Khan), who ends up getting instantly mocked at in hushed voices for her short hair.

Irritated by “what people think of her” and the lost honor, Gulab goes harsh on her doing what every brazen man in their little village isn’t afraid to do. He beats her, deprives her of the elusive good times, and shows her who the boss is.

still of riddhi sen as gulab in parched movie

Leena Yadav shows the bluntness of child marriage, even in those fleeting moments of geniality. She manifests the brusqueness of Dowry, and the pointlessness of the significance of something as trivial as hair. These contrasting things when placed together makes you hate such ugly traditions even more.


Riddhi Sen remains the element of misconduct. His acting is so brilliant, so convincing that you cannot hate him enough for his role, and yet love him for his acting. Radhika Apte’s effortless natural acts will have you convinced that she was built for that role. She acts like nobody’s watching her. Like there are no cameras on her; how acting is truly supposed to be like.

Sumeet Vyas’s Kishan is the only good the village retains. With the future of the village hating the guts of a man who is trying to do them some good, it goes on to show how no one really cares about winds of change. They look down upon him in disgust as a person progressing. Then they try to beat the crap out of him. Malice is written all over them.


I loved how Yadav tries to depict the concept of love which was nothing but elusive in that wretched village. It is evident when Lajjo, with hopes of making amends with her husband and her body, visits a man in a cave to conceive a child. Her innocence is apparent when Lajjo lies down with her legs wide open oblivious to an imminent emotional uplifting. Adil Hussain the mystic man then bows down to her, a reverence she was alien to. Then makes love to her in a way she has never experienced before. You can’t help but feel happy for her.

still of Radhika Apte as Lajjo in Parched

Some conversations are powerful enough to hit you with a brick. Like the one where Bijli realizes ‘how there is no expletive meant to disgrace men’? How come we never thought about it? Even in its derogatory sense of change you realize Leena Yadav talks a lot of sense.

The culminating point of the movie finds every character trying to wring off whatever had them bound. It is quite metaphorical when the Ravana, the evil burns, when Lajjo’s husband catches fire. When she stops Rani from putting out the fire, it goes on to tell how pushed Lajjo had felt all her life. That she decided to let nature’s poetic justice bring home justice.


Leena Yadav’s direction is magnificent when she has issues to address. She finds beauty in the deserted barren shots by taking it down with her subtleties. She is a clean winner when it comes to bringing accuracy out in the open. However, where the drama is supposed to be the decimating kind, she doesn’t call out her actors to perform.

The beauty of the movie is that it doesn’t make amends right away. This helps it to stay miles away from artificiality. That being said, what its characters encounter is not an overnight change. It goes on to show how their way of living still stays accepted in their minds even as they come out victorious.

What miffs you is that even though the word police was mentioned once, you don’t get to see them at all. It could be metaphorical in a sense about how in an unlawful state of disarray, people break rules without caring for its repercussions. Gulab was one typical example of that.

You can order your copy of the Parched movie here on Amazon:


When you try to squint hard at the drawbacks of the Parched movie, you realize that there aren’t that many. Except the fact that there have been plenty of movies on similar topics and Parched offers nothing original. Amongst other, there exists deliberate shots that seem pretty forced just to squeeze out fun. It appears at times like an unwrapped contrivance that you can see through to which you might shake your head to.

Rani wears a weird vexed layer of confusion. One time it feels like her character is trying to change, and is going to do something right hereon, but then she proves you wrong by doing the opposite of right. It is only until we reach the climax that we see her get on the rails again.

You can check out the trailer of the movie Parched here:

The Little Prince Review (2015) | Abounding with Stunning Metaphors

The Little Prince happened to me in the form of this movie. I didn’t have a clue, a story so colossal hid all this time from me. Le Petit Prince, the original product of the extraordinary brain of Antoine de Saint-Exupery, was published in the year 1943. It has found numerous collaborations over the years, all countless beautiful contributions hands down.

The Little Prince Overview

One of the best-selling books ever published, Le Petit Prince’s story is more of a parable that criticizes human nature with elements existing in real life. It chooses the character of a little lad with a huge brain whose words will literally open the insensible vaults of your brain. It does all of it using its clever flair by making allusions to mundane pointless characters that surround us in every area.

The Little Prince movie is a different take on the Le Petit Prince story. Even though it makes a few changes, introduces a fresher perspective, does some minor additions and subtractions here and there, it still doesn’t stop being less awesome.

Music of the Little Prince

You listen to the Preparation play and you will know how beautiful the composition is. None other than Hans Zimmer frontlines its beautiful score. He stays well complemented at all times by Richard Harvey. They create magic!

You can listen to the Preparation here:

The Plot of The Little Prince Movie: Spoilers Ahead

Words fail to describe how much relatable I found The Little Prince movie to be. To begin with, it eases in with a drawing of a boa constrictor trying to digest an elephant in its stomach. Showing how adults crush images in a child’s head, steering them away from their dreams, goes on to show how crass people’s imaginations are. They give precedence to things that are not worth paying attention to, and in their blunt obstinacy create robots just like them.

image of the little girl and her mother in the little prince movie

Then we are introduced to a little girl voiced by Mackenzie Foy (of the Interstellar fame) who is on her way to become a carbon copy of her mother. Discipline, perfection and non-stop studies are ways of her life, until one day she finds the first page of The Little Prince story. Her neighbor The Aviator voiced by Jeff Bridges strikes up a friendship chord with her and she discovers for the first time the brilliance in fancy. The story of the Little Prince penned by The Aviator piques her interest and she keeps visiting him to know more about it.

“When a mystery is too overpowering, one may not disobey.”

I loved the way how contrasting frames are picked up. It’s a perfect blend that draws awe right away. Like when the old man blows pain away from the girl’s hands, the air goes on to tremble the grass with its stop motion animation in the Little Prince’s story. Also, I loved how when she picks up a shell against her ears to find the voice of sea in it.

image of the first chapter in the aeroplane page sent by the aviator

Constant Run of Gorgeous Screenplay

Words of wisdom ooze out at every corner. Some straight from the Le Petit Prince book, whilst some by Irena Brignull and Bob Persichetti.

About hoarding, the aviator says:

“As you live, some things kind of just stick to you.

Mark Osborne uses a magnificent set of stop motion animation to weave the Little Prince’s original tale. The prince goes on to narrate his story to the aviator of how he met his rose, and about his sojourn therefrom.

There are metaphors galore, even in its subtle personification. Falling in love with a rose is actually insinuating falling in love with a girl.

The Little Prince: “You are perfect.”

Rose: “Am I not? I was born the same moment as the sun.”

The rad depiction of how the little prince just sits there, trying to reason with a vain Rose, how circumstances change the course of the planet and they end up sitting against each other have been beautifully animated.

“The shame of it was that they loved each other. But they were both too young to know how to love.”

The Rose realizes its mistake, and tries to apologize:

“Of course I love you. If you are not aware of that, it’s my fault.”

image of the little prince with rose still

Gloom lurks nevertheless in those button like eyes of the prince. You can make it all out with Osborne’s thoughtful depiction of dusk as he covers the Prince up in a glum demeanour.

“I would very much like to see a sunset. It would remind me of my rose.”

You can grab the DVD of The Little Prince movie here:

Characters: Reflections of Societal Elements

Biding somewhat by the original, wherein the Little Prince met six, here he meets three of the characters inhabiting asteroids. All of the three are uncanny lives that have been critiqued beautifully. One is a king without subjects who has a feigned sense of power and has nobody to rule over, very much suggestive of impersonators.

still of the conceited man in the little prince movie

Then there is that narcissistic element, the conceited man who just can’t wait to garner more praises. Reflective of how people run for vanity, even though it doesn’t earn them any strata. The third one is the Businessman who simply spends day counting stars which reflects people in real lives who are after money and materialism.

“What good does it do you to be rich?”

After knowing about all such characters in the little prince, the little girl realizes how grownups do not know what they are really after. They stay under the schism of immaterial things. She considers them really odd.

There is one brilliantly shot scene where the little girl is drinking from her glass, and from the bottom of it she realizes that her mother too is caught and lost in one asteroid, one planet of her own, just like those characters from The Little Prince tale.

“I am not so sure I wanna grow up any more.”

still of the little girl and the aviator in the little prince movie

To that the old Aviator explains:

“Growing up is not the problem. Forgetting is.”

The Prince Resumes his Tale

The Little Prince story continues with the prince finding a snake in the desert on Earth. He doesn’t find anybody else, and inquires:

“Where are the men? It is a little lonely in the desert.”

To which the snake replies:

“It is also lonely among men.”

Taming a Fox

It is then when he finds not a cunning, rather a clever fox and strikes up a chord.

“To me you will be unique in all the world. And to you I shall be unique in all the world.”

On coming across a rosebush, the prince becomes sad for he thought his rose was the only one in the whole universe.

“My rose is just a common rose? But she told me she was the only one of her kind in the whole universe.”

still of the fox and the little prince in a rosebush

Trying to reason with the prince, the fox expounds:

“But she is not a common rose. She is your rose. It is the time that you have devoted to her that makes your rose so important.”

With that the fox asks him to find her, dropping this beauty of a line:

“It is only with the heart that one can see rightly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.”

When the little girl outside the tale tries to understand why did the prince leave the fox, the aviator explains her the importance of moving on.

“The fox, he sees the little Prince when he looks with his heart. If you can do that you will never be lonely again.”

Along with that he also tries to insinuate that he would one day leave too. The girl manages with a heavy heart:

“But I need you here.”

still of the old aviator with his plane in the little prince movie

It is so sad that it brings tears to your eyes.

The Inevitable Showdown with her Mother

The showdown was always on the cards, since the little girl was always sneaking up, and lying to her mother. When it does finally happen, the girl stands up with:

“That’s your version of my life. Not mine. If you were ever around, you’d see that.”

Too blind to see the apparent, her mother tears her prince’s story pages and throws it in the dust bin. I loved the bit how she tapes it back, and the animation shows us then the desert in tapes. Beautifully thought of!

Words of wisdom keep spewing amidst the laughter of the prince, as the girl reads about him through her taped pages.

“The stars are beautiful because of a flower that cannot be seen. What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.”

still of the aviator and the little prince

In comes big advices that will leave you brooding:

“The men where you live grow thousands of roses, and they do not find what they are looking for. What they are looking for can be found in a single rose or a little water.”

The conversation of the aviator and the little girl is meanwhile the most nerve-racking kind. He says:

“When the moment does come for me to leave, I have to go alone.”

She tries to tell him she wishes to come too, not knowing he talks of death.

“Don’t go without me.”

Coming Out of The Little Prince’s Tale

The Little Prince meanwhile is bidding final adieu to the Aviator after telling him about his tale, and the fact that the snake has promised to end his misery rattles in the backdrop. He is trying to reason with:

“What is most important is invisible.”

As a parting gift he tells the aviator:

“In one of those stars, I shall be living. In one of them, I shall be laughing. And so when you look up at the sky at night, it will be as if all the stars are laughing.”

With that the snake bites the little prince, beautifully animated again making it disappear with a shimmer.

still of the little prince in desert

When the aforementioned is shared with the little girl, it bums her out. She doesn’t like how the story ends, incomplete with the little prince swaying in the stars without requiting to his lost waiting rose.

“I will grow up but I will never be a grown up like you.”

In that conversation with the aviator, she is angry at him for forgetting and disregarding the little prince. She remarks how he lost all hope, and forgot about fancy.

“You have forgotten everything, you have just become one of the grownups.”

She is mad at him beyond limit, and decides to return to her home for good. She doesn’t want to see him again, and days pass by. Her life continues with the same tinge of the stagnancy.

Once while returning, she finds the old aviator being taken to the hospital. It’s then when she feels truly sorry and runs for him like crazy. It is one of the most emotional segments of the movie, when she doesn’t stop at nothing to go see him.

The Second Story: Movie Addition

With an aim to rekindle the prince with its rose, she decides to embark the plane. Meaning she wishes to change the ending to the original. That’s when we are introduced to the second part of the story.

It is more like a different world, where characters have lost their purposes. It is a bizarre setup and for a second you start thinking that maybe the girl did start the plane, maybe she did go to a different planet, but then with the oddity, things fall in place. In reality, the girl simply tries to finish the tale with a happy ending, but from a different vantage.

There she meets all of those characters in different shoes, and ultimately the little prince who is all grown up. Her quest to take him to the rose meets fruition when they alight at the prince’s planet.

Grab your copy of The Little Prince Book here:

The final moments are the moments of epiphany for her, when despite everything she does the rose ends up dying, and withering away.

“You are supposed to be with her. I am gonna lose him too. And grow up. And forget all about him. Forget it all, forever. I don’t wanna lose him.”

It decimates you listening to her in despair. But when she realizes, with the hopeful eyes of the little prince, that all it takes is a glint of remembrance, she realizes what she wasn’t seeing.

“She was not a common rose. She was the only one of her kind in the whole universe. I remember her. I remember all of it. She is not gone. She is still here. It is only with the heart that one can see rightly.”

She concurs having a vision too.

“He will always be with me. I understand now.”

Meeting the Aviator in the Hospital

Coming back to the real world, she goes with her “changed” mother to the hospital to see the old aviator again. She offers him the book that had his pages and hers, then shattering into pieces in front of him.

“You run the risk of weeping a little, if you let yourself get tamed.”

The movie ends with her mother spending time with her, trying to see the world with a child like gusto. That one star that the little prince had promised would laugh from, then concludes this epic tale.

I recommend every one to watch this movie, if you haven’t ever come across The Little Prince before. Highly recommended stuff.

You can check out the trailer of The Little Prince here:

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl Review (2015) | Comical Allegory

I have been meaning to write the review of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl for so long that it makes me sad to see it stand waiting for so long, in the backcloth of my mind, hungry for appreciation. It deserves adulation. It deserves your attention. My sole intent is to shower undying love for this intensely deep and touching movie that beats every convention that mainstream cinema sells us today.


Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a constant droll that stays beautifully supplemented by the subtle direction of Alfonso Gomez-Rejon. What you cannot certainly overlook is its extraordinary cinematography that pays attention to meticulous details at different crises. If you pay attention enough you will approve the existence of the genius behind the camera.

still of greg and rachel walking in me and earl and the dying girl

Alfonso’s frames are in a perfect sync with the flick’s deadpan. Also, you are invariably smiling at the way things are shown which makes Me and Earl and the Dying Girl a propitious watch. Camera’s superlative swiveling from a single axle point and such countless experimentation throughout, will make you realize how Jesse Andrews might not have been able to get a better director for this movie.

Apart from stunning camera movements, the flick scores high on editing too. It stays fueled by its perfect timing for skipping frames, or throwing in a funny jest every now and then. Best ones are stop motion animation scenes that try to expound what our protagonist is thinking. It is intelligently depicted, and bides by its “out of the box” thinking.


Even though the titular flick gives away the primal plot through the moniker itself, it balances on a mere assertion to show us what might or might not happen. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl stays in the head of Greg played by Thomas Mann at all times, and depicts coming of age stuff from his perspective. We also have Earl who is Greg’s best friend, played by RJ Cyler who gives a brilliant icing to the story. There are subplots to the tale that unveil as a result of an unusual setup which get superbly helmed too.

It also has 21 mini movies that tell you how talented and amazing the brains behind the Me and Earl and the Dying Girl are. All of these short movies land up one way or the other inside the flick, and you can’t help but reflect on your childhood dreams. You are compelled to brood over that passion of yours that could never really go anywhere.

still of Olivia Cooke as Rachel in Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Olivia Cooke as Rachel is absolutely perfect for the role. Her eyes do most of the talking, and you can’t thank the casting director enough to have chosen her. Earl doesn’t disappoint either. He creates this perfect comportment to depict ‘distance’ whenever it was the call of the hour. Thomas Mann can’t be applauded enough. His Greg brings plausibility to the tale and makes him a very promising character.


The final movie on Rachel is a colossal metaphor. It leaves you wondering about things that constantly float in the head of Greg. It is hard to picture someone as furled as Greg have gargantuan profundity hidden.

There are images that run wild without words that try to say bazillion things to Rachel. It is Brian Eno’s music, and Greg’s animation that speak up abstract thoughts in a language only Rachel understands. It is so beautiful and poetic at the same time that you cannot clap enough for the writer to have thought something as eccentric as that.


Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a fun frolic into the lives of Greg, Earl and Rachel. But the tragedy that awaits or doesn’t, at the culmination point is going to leave your mind impassioned with emotions. A must watch!

Check out the trailer of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl here:

Masaan Review (2015) | Powerful Cinema Unleashed | On Love and Loss

I have been meaning to review Masaan for so long. It had always lurked in the corner of my brain as a profoundly helmed beauty that calls for unparalleled attention. So I am writing this, to celebrate it so that those who haven’t watched it already, should, and those who have, read it to experience its sagacity all over again.

Masaan beats Indian mainstream conventions hands down. A powerful flick that carves itself like a beautiful poem that elicits unmatched elation, a shattering pang and an aftermath that will steer your thoughts towards a rare contentment. The Varun Grover tale is reflective of all that he wears on his sleeves: a rare poetic depression, abstract lost love, and a constant struggle to be understood.


I was blown away by Masaan’s direction. So beautifully shot, and edited that it left me wonder-struck. Right at the juncture it takes off, the movie edits itself in a gorgeous fashion to show us only the important bits, allowing us to adjust us to its stunning pace. With no diegesis to support the frames, (a wise decision) spectators are left guessing for imminent frames. Something that settles in quite quickly. It is after the first few events of each tale that the story begins to unfurl in a beautiful flower thus giving us a better insight.

Neeraj Ghaywan has become one of my favourite directors all of a sudden. His intensity on frames feels instinctive that makes his direction absolutely stunning. It is important for a director to understand how he feels for his work, to place his feelings out there in the open for the world to see. Frames of Neeraj induce that successfully.


We have two primal parallel stories running for plot. The way they meet at a juncture lets us marvel at the concept of destiny.

still of Richa Chadha as Devi Pathak in Masaan movie

The first one is beautifully taken up superbly by actress Richa Chadha who embodies Devi Pathak making her one of her own. She gets decimated by lowlife societal thinking; her fate constantly followed up by a corrupt policeman. It is hard not to feel sorry for her. Her laconic conversations will have you listen to her thoughts. She talks with her acting most of the times, and you could literally see her blood curdling inside her heart with every profane remark she finds.

Struggling for reconciliation for her mishap, which she tries to set right by visiting the family of the guy whom she loved, Devi Pathak finds herself at the ugly side of abomination. It is like a colossal rejection she ends up facing by life itself. For her character, Richa Chadda retains a constant depression in her eyes which I don’t think any other actress could have done justice to.


The second story is spearheaded by Vicky Kaushal who plays Deepak Chaudhary brilliantly. In a backdrop of constant funerals, he is leading a life, rather trying to escape the detrimental. He is searching for rays of hope to escape the smothering ashes of pyres for good. The constant deleterious fire is setting ablaze his dreams and he can’t seem to get out. Until one day he falls in love.

still of Shaalu Gupta and Deepak Chaudhary in Masaan movie

Shweta Tripathi’s Shaalu Gupta is magnificently built out of thin air. You don’t really see their love story coming, and then out of the blue it arrives. So stupendous! Also it is so marvelously played that you will fall in love with both of them instantly.

Whilst Deepak is aware that he is going nowhere, that love is for those who have a future, as he beholds those manacles of casteism, prejudice and stratum dangling ahead, he decides to end it all. But then realizes it’s difficult to live without Shaalu and so he becomes more focused to get out of his conventional misery that constantly eats him from the inside.

Then that tragedy befalls that uproots his world, aftermath which nothing matters. The point he was living for disappears into nothingness. The ill-fated Deepak Chaudhary slithers into a gut-wrenching depression. Watching him like that will bring tears to your eyes. Watch out for that bit when he breaks down near the bank of Ganges.

still of Sanjay Mishra as Vidyadhar Pathak in Masaan movie

Sanjay Mishra runs a parallel sub-plot as well with a predictable plot but his unique acting style uplifts it nevertheless. He plays Vidyadhar Pathak, father of Devi Pathak. His ill-fated abyss wherein a corrupt Police Inspector Mishra keeps gnawing at him constantly and mercilessly will melt your heart with empathy.


Masaan doesn’t try to delve into poetic justice of the corrupt. India stays the land of corrupt in the eyes of Neeraj Ghaywan. That is one of the best decisions that Neeraj abides by. It is important to bring the injustice out in the open and not circle it to fruition by adjudication. If Neeraj had chosen to show the Inspector Mishra getting caught, it would have made us complacent. A feeling of insouciance towards corruption would have crept up on us unknowingly and we would have accepted the way of things, thinking – “Okay! So it all got sorted out in the end. But manifesting him getting away with it was intentional just to boil the viewers up.

So he makes sure. How the ignorant gets fooled by the bribing eyes of those in power. The abuse and misuse of power will have you brooding how despotism still lurks in a place that should be completely absolved of it. The land of God is run by vultures, who can do anything to fill their pockets. There is so much exploitation still prevalent in India that you will incessantly feel bad for the uneducated.

The sad thing is that we are living amidst it all. The corruption, that has diffused in our holy waters in profusion. We are drinking it everyday, accepting it and thriving with it. That is the saddest part of it all.


Screenplay goes above average at times. Songs like these:

“Tu kisi rail si guzarti hai, main kisi Pull sa thartharata hoon”

still of Deepak and Shaalu played by Vicky Kaushal and Shweta Tripathi in Masaan

Help in driving Masaan’s nail deeper. Its true metaphor lies in the embodiment of the inanimate. Image yourself as a quaking bridge, as that reckless train (her) passes over you, leaving you tottering craving for her affection. Then there is another beautiful line that is on the lines of:

“I am like a bubble, when I think about you I burst.”

There are two other great songs imbibed in the frames of Masaan. ‘Bhor’ has been aptly placed to complement its love theme. Both Shaalu and Deepak do it justice. ‘Mann Kasturi’ ambles on its impactful lyrics as well.


Masaan is like rising from the ashes. Building yourself from scratch because nobody bats an eye when you fall, or understands you in a way you do yourself.

The movie silently brings home a whiff of change. We are at the center of it, and I can feel it. Now all we have to do is encourage movies like Masaan, give our riveting attention and love, and we might see the Indian Cinema metamorphose itself into a enclave.

Check out the trailer of Masaan movie here:

Hardcore Henry Review (2015) | Gut-wrenching Gore Action Galore

A deafening howl to gore action lovers! People, you have got to watch Hardcore Henry if you wish to experience non-stop gut-wrenching action that is beyond the levels of Shoot ‘Em Up. The action this movie has, places it right up at the top amongst the elite avant garde action group.


What does a good action movie need? Thrilling stunts, profuse gore, constant adrenaline rush, great story to keep it all together. Well, Hardcore Henry has it all, except for the latter which unfortunately stops it from becoming an epic action flick. Nevertheless, we keep our eyes closed and ignore those apparent bits just for the uncanny style of film-making the movie induces.


It is hard to look away (unless you are a wimp) from this action-packed affair of a movie, which gives you a first person perspective akin a game. Just imagine all those place where action might seem possible, and it is all there. Imagine the heights a flick could go to create palpable gun fights, and it soars high to shoot them all. Imagine how ugly a hand-to-hand combat could go, and it surpasses it too.

Hardcore Henry might be odious when it comes to showing gritty yet ugly fight sequences, but they are all spot on. It walks you through a world of chaos as if you were in those Henry shoes. Things that happen in 1 hour 36 minutes of stark scrimmage is something you might want to prep your feeble heart for, in advance.


The surreal part about Hardcore Henry is that Henry can’t speak. So, that leaves us with all ears, listening to other characters talk.

The best character of the movie is undoubtedly Jimmy played superbly by Sharlto Copley. He puts himself in a couple of crazy shoes creating mind-boggling characters, out of which the best one is that of the British World War 2 Corporal. As he occasionally drops off witty one-liners icing them with “Laddie” he scores extraordinary kills alongside Henry.

A still of Jimmy from Hardcore Henry

A grenade a day keeps the enemy at bay.

Also, watch out for that musical dance bit that he does whilst leaving bodies.

Hardcore Henry has a gaming air to it. Right from the start, it would seem as if you are playing a great action game. Guns, grenades, hand-to-hand, it has everything squeezed for emphasis. It has a stunning sniper moment too!


Unfortunately the flick scores really low when it comes to showing a decent movie mien. Things that stop it from hitting that territory are its surreal looks and a weird comportment that it tries to build for its countless action shootouts. The plot of the movie seems like a game rip-off.

Also, there is a sustained palpable absurdity to it that makes you take its characters for a joke. Also, some actors, despite the theatrics, degrade its quality beyond limit. Starting from Danila Kozlovsky as Akan, who comes off as a strong villain, is really shoddy with his acting.

Hardcore Henry movie scores the lowest in Screenplay as well. There aren’t many good lines to cherish except one or two. Melodrama looks really fabricated as well.


You could only imagine the heights the director Ilya Naishuller is willing to scale to ace this beauty. Visual effects are insane! Stunts astounding! Watch out for some thrilling slo-mo bits that the movie retains. You can’t help but give an ovation to him.

Overlooking every flaw the movie has, for its avant garde rare ‘reaching-for-the-moon style’, we focus on what it Hardcore Henry really is. Outright Hardcore!

PS: If you are a die-hard gamer, you are going to fall in love with this movie instantly.

You can check out the trailer of Hardcore Henry here:

Far from the Madding Crowd Review (2015)

An ode to the jilted!

Far from the Madding Crowd is a movie that lets us dig into the extraordinary Thomas Hardy genius that gorgeously scales his unique style of story building. David Nicholls knits a fine screenplay to complement the powerful Hardy plot. Thomas Vinterberg on the other hand helms sheer magic. His direction is subtle, focuses on the call of the hour and displays only the best bits he thinks worth depicting.


Born in this era I didn’t have the good hap of watching the first one first, so I decided to accept whatever was flung before me. The setup even though modishly shot doesn’t even for once gives away the intended timeline. You can’t help but compare it to the likes of Gone with the Wind. There are magnificently shot landscapes that will compel you to marvel at innate scenery our planet offers. Lush farms and the tranquility surrounding it will force you to have second thoughts about all the urban choices you made.


When we look at the cast, Carey Mulligan was an extraordinary find. The role she plays – Bathsheba Everdene is a girl with education, an independent woman who doesn’t want to be tied down by promises of love. She can’t be picketed down like someone’s property, until she hits an infatuation herself in the form of Sergeant Francis Troy played by Tom Sturridge. She becomes bewitched at once, slave to her emotions and that’s when a terrible mistake happens. Like she puts it “between jealousy and distraction” she marries him. It is hard not to feel sorry for her to find the inconsiderate guy that doesn’t give two rats about her, and two jilted lovers who only hoped for the best in the backdrop. Carey’s character will also peeve you beyond limit when she turns down brilliant advices by Gabriel Oak played by Matthias Schoenaerts. But isn’t that how life happens to us all? One moment we think we are right only to tumble and rise again. Bathsheba is quite relatable in that respect, and she gets forgiven as well.


The sheep bit in the beginning was one of the gloomiest unfortunate events to have befallen Oak. It was impactful in a way that was capable of flinging you in a sudden gush of emotions. There was nothing Oak could have done to stop that from happening. As the sheep fell all I could remember was being the “The Catcher in the Rye“. Really powerful stuff!


The thing that miffed me in Far from the Madding Crowd was Gabriel Oak’s acting. Even though the script desired him to stay taut like a rock, we don’t see him nail any kind of emotion ever. His act is banal and makes you wonder if he was the right choice for the role. William Boldwood played by Michael Sheen, au contraire acted brilliantly and aced his character to perfection. Jilted finds a meaning on his face, as he takes the gun to pass the eventual poetic justice. Also, I couldn’t help but notice there was no such gut-wrenching drama to it, presence of which could have possibly made the movie even better. However, in the end every frame was worth it.


Far from the Madding Crowd is a very well written, acted and shot flick! Far from the Madding Crowd will impel you to question the choices your reckless head makes.

The Witch Review (2015)

The Witch is a beautifully helmed ghastly take on black magic straight from folklore!

Whilst witchcraft is a topic still quilted under dubious clouds, the story Robert Eggers weaves is no less than the work of a genius. There is excruciating dread imbibed in his way of storytelling that makes it one of a kind. Eggers maintains a regular pace throughout the flick to milk our fears without going into the shoddy territory. We feast on some high quality filmmaking.


The topic of witches has rarely ever touched such a tangible and lucid style of direction. You haven’t experienced a disquiet quite like this before, and gore that throws you into fits of anxiety! Acts of witchcraft create a metaphor which is quite clamorous if you really pay heed. You cannot help but feel helpless, cannot stop feeling sorry for the characters entailed, by silently wishing them goodwill. But alas! this is one of the darkest movies ever made. So, if you have a feeble heart just be prepared mentally and you can bear the imminent.


The Witch isn’t exactly your average horror flick that tries to scare you with disappearing-appearing acts, or by messing around with the cameras, or via zooming in or zooming out effects. Au contraire, it is one of those purest forms of horror that is allowed to gradually develop in you, as you scale its frames right from the very beginning. Very engaging stuff that will leave you traumatized with abominable witch acts!


You cannot help but marvel at the way Eggers captures his gorgeous frames. The serenity of the woods that he arrests in his frames icing it with a harrowing music in the background is beyond comparison. Captivating landscapes and natural shots that he takes make the movie a visual entertainer. You can almost read the tranquility of the woods through his endearing screens.


The casting has been done brilliantly. Screenplay is smitten with Shakespearean English which some might find hard to understand. Music is very grim but just about perfect for a horror movie. The Witch is a well manufactured affair that Robert Eggers manages to conjoin with his rad direction and writing style.

The Man Who Knew Infinity Review (2015)

The Man Who Knew Infinity is a good biopic, not the greatest of ones, but does ample justice to the prodigy.


I remember reading an extraordinary account of Ramanujan from Hardy’s pages back in school, where he subtly described the genius he was and the valuable contribution he made to the Mathematical society. I distinctly remember G.H. Hardy’s thoughts what Ramanujan meant to him, and how impactful was the polymath to his life. Their friendship could be read through those pages I had the good hap of reading.

With that memory stick I went ambling to the theatres to see The Man Who Knew Infinity. To begin with the direction I must say, Matt Brown has a lot of ground to cover. You could see his inexperience through the way he chops off a frame. It leaves you almost baffled. He doesn’t concentrate much on the crucial elements that needs depicting but rather fleets from one cloud to another with a skittish head. There is no subtlety to his frames.


The music in the movie doesn’t complement his work either. It is not at all powerful, and doesn’t ever reach a theatrical level at any juncture. Speaking of theatrics, there is none in the movie. So you can expect a very bland and insipid way of storytelling that will make you averse to the Ramanujan way of living almost instantly.


Despite all of the above, what tries to uplift The Man Who Knew Infinity? Who works the best? Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel hands down. Their acting prowess is a joy to watch. Au contraire, some actors we meet in the beginning are really pathetic in the acting department, exacerbated further by Brown’s direction. But then gradually the biopic picks up its pace and we see Jeremy Irons on a roll. His speeches are intelligently carved, and his reckless yet powerful voice does justice to all of them. Toby Jones as Littlewood was a pleasant genial companion. Jeremy Northam does a great Bertrand Russell as well.


The story doesn’t digress from the original which was a good thing. The number 1729 isn’t missed either. The setup however gets a little bit morphed there, but we can understand that was done for emphasis. The drama isn’t the touching kind.


It is unfortunate what happens to great men. S. Ramanujan couldn’t escape life’s unpredictable warps either, and ended up disappearing in a dire mist.

At the end I feel his life needs to be glorified a bit more. There was little we saw of his origins, and his progression towards his virtuoso which is a key factor into moulding a prodigy-biopic.

What Matt did with The Man Who Knew Infinity was good but what Ramanujan deserves is the best.

American Ultra Review (2015)

Watching American Ultra was like reading a comic book. Not a really good one though. The average sorts. It was fun whilst it lasted.


As we take the reins of the joy ride, we find characters reeking of normalcy in the starting bit, if we overlook the battered protagonist in the prologue for a second. We think everything is going fine then boom comes the jackhammer, and the story takes a colossal twist. It unfurls into a bigger plot that tells you that you have been looking at it all wrong. Comical factors pop in and you at once understand, “Oh! So it is going to pitter-patter like that.” You switch that mode on overlooking everything then, all the elements that constitute to form a good movie. Yes, it isn’t a good movie.


There is some humour in the movie, yes. They try to make you laugh with some extraordinary characters like John Leguizamo’s Rose which was brilliant. Topher Grace is great as Adrian Yates. Laugher tries to enter the theatrical juncture only to compel you into hating him more. Jesse Eisenberg is exceptional as Mike Howell. You couldn’t have found a better actor to play the confused Mike. Good job there!


Comes with a pretty nonsensical clichéd concept of turning an agent with a code word, which we have seen many times in a bad Disney movie, this one started heading towards disaster right then and thereon. The music further broils it further by going into juvenile trenches with upbeats trying to rescue the flick whenever action came. Editing of American Ultra was well, okay, as it focused on dire elements alone, and decided not to bore you with a constant adrenaline.


The chemistry Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg try to weave with this was good though. It keeps you engaged. With all the cheesy dialogues and stupid gore you still manage to rivet yourself to your seats. I loved the fact that despite everything Mike yapped about, Phoebe would always listen to each word he said with rapt attention.

However, eventually Max Landis doesn’t go original with the writing, and it ends up like a clichéd tale which is good only for one-time watching.

Demolition Review (2015)

A twisted drama!

Comes another melodramatic venture from the beautiful head of Jean-Marc Vallee, Demolition is a movie not for everyone. Whilst I personally love his direction, in the back of the head I get this feeling it might overwhelm some with apathy.


Demolition lets you delve into the head of a guy who goes rogue on account of a recent mishap. Jake Gyllenhaal gets into the skin of Davis, a guy who doesn’t pay much attention to what’s going on around him, until he does. The world we behold then is brimming up with his insanity, and he seems at one point to have reached heights of the inane. Some of his acts seem really fatuous but some instigated. But it is the constant struggle between the two that the director pushes us toward which makes things hard to digest.


Jake Gyllenhaal is, no doubt, outstanding as the protagonist who loses it all in the very beginning frames of the movie. It unfolds into a great sojourn as people make an effort to fathom his fatuous acts, which he justifies through his phenomenal explanatory yet endearing letters to Karen (Naomi Watts), a character we see appear out of the blue. For some moments, you will have a hard time wrapping your head around the mist she appears from. At one junction, I took her for a figment, but then when we see her world unfurling with more twisted people, things kind of sediment.


You see a sub-plot protruding right then with the inclusion of Chris (Judah Lewis) to the tale. The side story comes more as a helping hand to see the thrilling side of demolishing something, a secondary perspective which tries to address a persisting LGBT issue too. It is weird how with those moments with Chris, Karen disappears completely only to return when she is needed for the movie. A sense of disconnect that makes things impalpable. In his strides towards the extraordinaire, Jean-Marc Vallee often misses out on the flick’s substance.


Watching Jake groove to the beats was one of the most amusing and cool parts. His carefree reckless dancing makes you fall in love with him even more. Watching him rip apart everything he thinks beautiful, gives you a silent satisfaction. To feel that relatable urge to annihilate things to tatters, was a reassuring contended sight. Albeit it becomes very difficult to relate to his character after one point, owing to some humorous bits in the movie, which seemed more like a deliberate attempt to aid the movie into reaching its climax, which was also quite fromward from its original steer. But the climax unravels with a punch in a gorgeous fashion that covers up for the indifference that we face midway.

The fact that Julia (the wife) bides by and stays impregnated in Davis’ chores has been beautifully depicted in the Demolition. The way she gets mirrored to him every time goes on to show – no matter how aloof you are from someone your head somehow finds them through regular habits.

Screenplay of Bryan Sipe goes brilliant at times but ambles quietly on a constant high and low road. Chris Cooper does a very thoughtful loving and caring dad that almost breaks you up, if it weren’t for the callous Davis demeanour to put you back in his mood.


One of the most powerful parts of Demolition is Davis’ resurrection, as he feels sorry for his acts, and actually starts to miss Julia. That’s when he pulls himself together to meet a stranger who visits her grave. Mistook for the guy whom she was dating before her death, Davis decides to acknowledge him only to find out he was the guy responsible for the accident. It puts you in your brooding gears.


I could totally understand what the director is feeling when he tries to jog us down through that grieving lane. Unfortunately, he fails to connect us to his thoughts. With demolition, he couldn’t really open up wide and audaciously to the public, which I kind of felt defeats the purpose.

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