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Loving Vincent Review (2017) | Perfect Homage | Full Analysis with Spoilers

Speechless! Loving Vincent movie is a work of a genius, of a combined effort of a team and a vision of directors who have immense knowledge about how to film a scene. What stands out almost immediately is the way it has been projected and portrayed on 65000 oil paintings by hundreds of artists from all across the globe, and such fine animation it retains that it would leave every innate motion to shame.

The amount of work that has been put in and the gargantuan size of that effort will leave you marveling over what humans can achieve if they put their heart into something. It is an ideal paragon of colossal things that we can achieve when braided together.

A Forgotten History

Loving Vincent not only boasts of its teamwork but it also carefully builds itself over that thin edge of reverence and criticism that we often carry for forgotten people.

For instance, so far I just knew that Vincent Van Gogh was one of the most brilliant painters of his time and that he was one ear short as portrayed in one of his self-paintings. I knew nothing of how, nothing about his life or the history that he became whilst trying to do one thing he loved to do – painting. Until of course, I saw Loving Vincent movie for myself, and everything changed. My very perception of this man I didn’t know. I felt a hole in my heart being filled as I  was able to relate to Vincent who had so much going on in his life.

It is hard not to love him not for just the work he did, of which it speaks volume, but for a man trying to find his place in a world that failed to understand him. The latter relates to me on so many levels that I fell in love with the artist almost instantly.

The Plot of Loving Vincent

The plot basically strands out from Vincent Van Gogh’s life, as was consumed after death from the eyes of Armand Roulin from The Roulin Family It is voiced and painted on Douglas Booth who by the way fits right into the presumable boots of the original, of a man who had grown to hate Vincent. But as Loving Vincent progresses he comes to understand Vincent’s mindset appreciating him all the way.

Armand empathizes for him, wearing his shoes as he becomes him, literally sleeping in his bed to realize that the world was just too cruel for Vincent and that people failed to do enough.

Full Spoilers and Analysis of Loving Vincent

There are questions that weigh on him of which he elicits answers from, but in doing so he becomes immensely affected. Trying to deliver Vincent’s last letter which was given to Armand’s father postmaster Joseph Roulin who was also one of Vincent’s friends (he has been painted as well), Armand stumbles across many people who help him understand why Vincent shot himself starting from:

  • Pere Tanguy (The Paint Supplier)
  • Louise Chevalier (The Housekeeper)
  • Adeline Ravoux
  • The Boatman
  • Marguerite Gache
  • Young Man with a Cornflower
  • Old Peasant
  • Gendarme Rigaumon
  • Doctor Mazery
  • Doctor Gachet

Babes are like animals son. They can know the heart of a man just by the sight of them.

As a side mission to delivering that letter, he takes upon himself to solve the mystery of the suicide as was asked of him by his father. Armand meets all kinds of people, the ones who hated Vincent to the core to the people who really adored him.

Live longer, you will see. Life can even bring down the strong.

The Past

He learns that Vincent was really close to his brother Theo (Cezary Lukaszewicz)to whom the letter was intended.

Two hearts. One mind.

Vincent’s death had left him shattered.

He had actually been with him a whole day at the end, but Vincent insisted they use the time to discuss life not death.

Theo died six months after his brother. As a flashback of sorts, we get to relive the story of Vincent.

He tried so hard to fit into his family. But, he never succeeded in this.

Vincent’s early life was a mess owing to how difficult he found it to find his place.

He struggled to be what they wanted him to be.

But when he picked up the brush when he was 28 (it’s never too late to follow your dreams people) with Theo’s support he was able to pursue it for real. Paris happened to him as Pere Tanguy (John Sessions), puts it:

Everything that happens in art happens here.

Vincent took it as a pitstop to learn before finally bidding farewell to Pere. The latter suggests Armand to see a certain Dr. Gachet (Jerome Flynn) whom he had seen crying the most at Vincent’s funeral.

Louise Chevalier

Next, he runs into Louise Chevalier (Helen McCrory) trying to find the Doctor. She hated Vincent to the core. Louise opines about Vincent as being a troublemaker.

He had these bewildered eyes in which there was something insane, something which you dare not look.

There is this particular scene where Vincent walks into the Doctor’s house as his eyes fall on Marguerite Gachet (Saoirse Ranon), the doctor’s daughter. You could tell Louise hating him for it, stopping and staring at Marguerite like that.

But when you get to hear the story later from Marguerite Gachet’s own mouth, that exact meeting feels entirely different. Vincent had these careful reading eyes, that he couldn’t help stopping to meticulously admire things of beauty whenever he bumped into one.

There is something in that fleeting moment of admiration that stops an artist and takes him away on a tour with his canvas, as an imminent painting in his head unfurls, fluttering to be drawn. (that moment uplifted by “Marguerite Gache at the piano” music by Clint Mansell)

And such veneration one might and one should feel to be identified as a beautiful object by the world’s greatest painters himself. It’s a shame that Louise didn’t know. It’s a shame that nobody knew back then.

It is interesting how perspectives are read. While to Louise, it was unruly but to Marguerite, it was just oodles of love. Just imagine that stark stare of having been identified, of being marked to be painted in the future. If an artist is sundered from his artistry, it would be downright criminal. Louise feels like one of those people who could have done such a thing was she her mother.

Adeline Ravoux

Failing to find the doctor, Armand decides to trace Vincent’s steps by sleeping in the same ‘hole’ where Vincent used to stay. There he meets Adeline Ravoux (Eleanor Tomlinson) and they bond quickly.

There’s a line nicely put about her always running errands for her father, which reflects what Armand was doing all this time.

Adeline fills him in her side of the story of how Vincent had shown up with a bullet wound saying,

I tried to kill myself.

How Dr. Gachet was the first one to show up, and how Gindarme Rigaumon (Martin Herdman) came to take Vincent’s statement, and to locate the whereabouts of the gun that was used.

Next was Theo who showed up and stayed with him until the very end.

If only I could’ve been one of them.

Adeline revisits the day she had met Vincent and admired how organized he was, loving how he was different from the rest.

I was wondering when he slept, painting all day, writing these long letters, always reading these fat books.

She suggests Armand to go talk to The Boatman (Aidan Turner) since Vincent loved spending time on the river.

The Boatman

The Boatman remembers Vincent for how carefully he would watch life around the river.

He didn’t talk so much mostly just sat around watching, sometimes painting.

One of the most beautiful moments (uplifted by “Marguerite Gache at the piano” music again) in Loving Vincent, is when he tries to recollect a crow trying to steal Vincent’s food.

He looked so happy that this dirty crow was coming close. Didn’t seem to care that it ran off with his lunch.

The Boatman tells Armand about the boating parties where Vincent would often be found hanging around with the rich boys. On a remark about Vincent being shy, The Boatman tells him about Marguerite Gachet who would often come to the river with Vincent.

They were chatting in that way, you know, like speaking to each other was the most exciting thing ever.

The Church Contrast

Armand once again meets Adeline and comes to know of the rumour spread by the housekeeper about Doctor Gachet being overprotective of his daughter. As the church bells ring in the backdrop, it gives him an idea to ensure the housekeeper is visiting so that he could go see Marguerite at her home.

The housekeeper spills venom for Vincent, smudging him with her theories, of her take on him yet again.

I could see the fever in his eyes at first glance. And the great artist himself, always skulking about, gobbling our food, just making messes in corners.

It’s brilliant how the directors chose to put its immediate line as a summon from the church. It’s the contrast depicting a typical human mind and the way it works.

The placement of spewing ugly things for someone, cursing him, and then remembering to pray, you have to marvel at the pointlessness of doing good when you have just done something bad. It just goes on to show how fickle human mind is. That Louise was simply practicing the exact opposite of what she preached. There was more contempt in her than love while the church never preaches to hate.

Armand finds his window of opportunity to speak to Marguerite when she capers off to church.

Marguerite Gachet

Retraced their first meeting, Marguerite paints over what had actually happened, trying to conceal the truth. We get to see the things that had happened through some black and white frames as Vincent had stopped to marvel Marguerite with his searing eyes.

She fills Armand about Doctor Gachet of how both Vincent and Doctor shared common interests. Vincent at one point had called Gachet as his third brother.

They were both artists. They liked the same painters. They understood each other.

Once again hiding the truth Marguerite says that they didn’t socialize even though Vincent painted her several times. On instigating her further and pointing fingers at the Doctor, Marguerite asks him to leave.

Dissecting Vincent

Back at the hole, Adeline is pissed off at Armand for leaving her in the middle of a conversation. When Armand tells her why he had left, she tries to recollect more about Doctor Gachet and Vincent.

Maybe they were similar on the outside. He had the same red hair, and that same sad look in his eyes. But, on the inside, they were chalk and cheese.

The immediate frame follows a scene describing how Vincent wasn’t snobbish like Gachet. That he was kind, polite and loving. A little girl shows up to draw with Vincent, as her mother snatches her away to bed.

She’s no trouble.

There is poignancy caked in that scene where you get to feel the emotional pang for Vincent. How the world failed to understand him! They took him for a madman when all he was trying to do was follow his heart.

It also depicts how ravaging it is to destroy the innocence of a child by forcing routines on budding brains. All the poor child wanted was to learn from the best, but the world was and it still is, too insolent to fathom. They are worried about their children becoming one. They want them living simple normal lives instead unknowingly.

Tea Towels

The story of Loving Vincent movie unspools more at this very juncture when Adeline tells Armand about how Vincent longed to meet his brother. He got to meet him just once but the meeting didn’t go well.

When he returned from the visit he started asking Adeline for tea towels instead of canvases, since the latter were costly. It was clear that he had had an argument with his brother about money-related issues. It was Theo who bought all his painting accessories after all.

Vincent had handed over a letter to Adeline to be delivered to Theo, asking for paints, that he had a lot of ideas brimming in him.

This is where he lived? And where he died.

Armand lies in Vincent’s bed reading his first letter to Theo.

I feel I see the North all the better from my trip to the South.

He talks about the beauty of the new place he had nestled in. He talks about Doctor Gachet as well.

Doctor Gachet is eccentric. I don’t know how he thinks he can cure me when he seems at least as sick as I am.

As there is nothing else to do but follow your heart, time literally stops for you. There is plenty of time at hand to think and come up with unique creations.

The days seem like weeks to me.

Old Peasant and the Young Man with a Cornflower

Sleeping in his bed, feeling the exact amount of pain Vincent felt, Armand encounters him in a dream, gasping for air and wandering off into the white light.

Waking up, out smoking he finds the Young Man with a Cornflower (from Vincent’s painting) hurling stones at him. He chases him down to end up in a barn.

The curiosity of Vincent’s death takes Armand to the fields as he tries to retrace the last day as was spent by Vincent. He once again bumps into the young man with the cornflower chasing him yet again. This time he encounters an Old Peasant who apologizes for the young man’s behavior, telling him the young man was his nephew and didn’t mean any harm.

It is from the peasant that Armand gathers that the barn Armand had visited the night before was actually where Vincent had been shot, and not as some had claimed, in the fields.

Rene Secretan

Talks about how he had found the pistol to shoot himself gave away that the pistol could have been very well that of Doctor Gachet or Ravoux. With the housekeeper writing it off as Ravoux’s and Adeline writing it off by saying they had sold it before Vincent was shot, a new development happens when The Boatman reveals that it was Rene Secretan (Marcin Sosinski) who was the buyer of that gun.

Rene was one of those young lads Vincent hung around with. Infuriated for something Rene had said to Vincent, Armand asks why the boatman didn’t smack the lad. To which he replies:

It wasn’t my business. It wasn’t my fight.

Armand is boiling with the fact that something could have been done, and it wasn’t done. You stand for your friends no matter what. That’s what he believed in. If the boatman would have stood for Vincent, he might not have been dead, so he thought.

What are Friends For?

But the Boatman is right when he says if Vincent didn’t want to stay in the company of the young, he could have simply left, but he chose to hang around maybe because Rene would always get the tab (insinuates financially instability once again).

Armand is disappointed in all the people who called themselves Vincent’s friends and he lays it on the poor boatman. The boatman counteracts by saying, what did Armand do for Vincent?

The Boatman: Were you such a great friend?
Armand: I never said I was.

Pissed off by those who bully others, because of how Rene bullied Vincent, Armand takes a stand for the Young man with a cornflower and gets into a fight with some hooligans who were bullying him. Waking up he realizes that he had socked even Gendarme Rigaumon who had come to restore peace.

Vincent generated more letters than a town.

Doctor Mazery

Rigaumon tells him about a certain Doctor Mazery (Bill Thomas) who had pestered Rigaumon to file his report. Meeting Mazery it becomes clear to Armand that it wasn’t suiciding after all. Mazery goes into the details of how suicides generally entail people shooting themselves either on the head or through the temple.

Most likely he was shot.

Doctor Mazery’s theory clearly suggested that Vincent was shot from a distance since it was impossible to shoot yourself up point blank range and not have the bullet go through you. He enacts a whole scenario to prove how he must have been shot.

It is quite clear with that Vincent wasn’t the one holding the gun.

Back at The Fields

Lost in contemplation, Armand’s thoughts are broken by Marguerite Gachet who emerges into the fields.

I was thinking how come you lied if you have got nothing to hide?

Marguerite breaks the bubble by filling Armand with the details.

The truth is I am not important. He wasn’t some lovelorn teenager.

She tells him about her father Doctor Gachet, a wannabe artist who tried to be one all his life. It bothered Gachet that a man like Vincent who had just started painting two years ago was painting so well whilst he still struggled with it. He would copy Vincent’s paintings in his room trying to reiterate what was painted.

Gachet believed that Vincent was not to be distracted and often asked Marguerite to leave so as to stop her from becoming an obstacle to the creation of masterpieces.

Vincent and Gachet had a terrible row once for which Marguerite believed she was the cause.

Maybe my withdrawal had soured things.

To which Armand replies:

You are not to blame. You have no part in it.

Overlooking Life

Armand so far truly believes that it was Rene who had shot Vincent, as all the evidence suggested. Marguerite replies:

So lonely Vincent resorts to hanging around with drunken teenagers and he gets shot. Or he shoots himself in despair at his lonely life. The result is the same.

And what she says is so true if you listen to her carefully. You can’t change what has happened. The resultant eventuality cannot be deterred. The death has happened, his life has been taken. You can’t do anything about it now.

To Armand’s obstinacy about finding the culprit at any cost, she says:

You want to know so much about his death, but what do you know of his life?

Armand just knew that Vincent tried really hard to fit in, to prove that he was good at something. That’s when Marguerite explains why she chooses to take flowers at his grave. Because she knew that Vincent appreciated it, even the beauty in triviality.

No detail of life was too small or too humble for him. He appreciated and loved it all.

Doctor Gachet

Finally, Armand gets to meet Doctor Gachet in person in Loving Vincent. As he is about to take the letter from Armand’s hand, questions begin to roll out from a well-researched Armand’s mouth. It is time to hear the truth.

Doctor Gachet explains that Vincent was a victim of melancholia.

Sufferers can change from feeling life is a wondrous joy to being stuck in a pit of despair within six hours.

There are counter statements to everything Armand lays on the table. He begins to understand that Vincent was lonely. That there was a mask Vincent would wear at times to stay joyous, but deep down things were different.

Underneath he was deeply afraid of the future of his own and Theo’s.

Vincent felt he was trouble for Theo since the latter was paying his bills, even as Theo supported his vision. He was becoming a liability owing to his dream. Theo could have had a great life had he not spent money on Vincent all those years.

He knew Theo had spent a small fortune on him. The knowledge of this tore into Vincent.

The fact that Vincent wasn’t able to provide anything in return broke his heart. He had how Gachet put it:

Rooms full of paintings that no one wanted to buy.

Gachet looked into the soul of Vincent to read him properly.

Vincent’s biggest fear was that the burden of him would bring down his brother.

Gachet shuts off Armand’s belief of Vincent being shot (the Mazery theory) by saying it was Vincent, the bloke who always did the improbable. That it was highly likely Vincent had shot himself. On furthering the queries, like this one:

Why would he say there’s no one to blame unless he thought someone might be blamed?

The Truth Behind the Suicide

Gachet reveals the real truth then. That Vincent was trying to save Gachet if fingers were to point at him for the suicide.

I think he took his life to try and save Theo because of something I had said.

They were in an argument where Vincent called Gachet an artistic fraud, since he wanted to be an artist, but he ended up studying medicine because he could never stand up to his father.

Vincent said I was living a lie whilst he lived and struggled for the truth.

Furious at what he had said, Gachet was forced to slip in a piece of harsh truth. That Theo was suffering from Syphilis, and that any sort of mental or financial stress would kill him.

What do you think the burden of worrying about you is doing to your brother? It’s quite likely killing him. That is the price of your truth, the price of your path as an artist. Is it worth it?

Those harsh lines were it. Vincent turned around and left, as Gachet realized his big mistake. He didn’t know then that Vincent would do something so huge like taking his life.

Maybe it is better for everyone.

We see a shattered Gachet on Vincent’s deathbed. There are so many thoughts that are going through his head. Had he not said something so bitter, Vincent would have been alive and painting.

Words can really kill people. If it is a real loss of talent, it hurts everyone. Crippled by the situation and marred by a financial crisis, Vincent slipped into the arms of death. He didn’t want to be any trouble, and taking his life felt to him the only way he could have seen to it.

A Letter for a Letter

As a parting note in Loving Vincent, Gachet offers Armand one of Vincent’s letters from the time he had started his journey to become an artist. This is what the letter contained:

Who am I in the eyes of most people? A nobody, a non-entity, an unpleasant person. Someone who has not, and never will have any position in society. In short, the lowest of the low. Well then, even if that were all absolutely true, then one day I will have to show by my work what this nobody, this non-entity has in his heart.

There’s a little discussion by the end of Loving Vincent movie between the Roulins. The father and the son have a chat about Armand failing to land a job. Armand says he was asked by Lieutenant Milliet (Robin Hodges) to enlist since he could throw punches.

Armand: I am good at fighting, aren’t I?
Joseph: Roulin’s have always been that. The trick is to know what you are fighting for.

Joseph looks at the star and makes this amazing statement then.

 There’s a whole other world up there. Something we get to gaze upon but don’t fully understand. It reminds me of him. It feels wrong all that life snuffed out because of a stupid accident.

Armand is more interested in the loving part instead.

What I am wondering is if people will appreciate what he did.

Will we revere Vincent for his work and not for taking his own life? Accident or not it doesn’t define Vincent. His work does. There should be immense veneration in us for that, and for the fact that how artists like him struggle to follow their dreams owing to hindrances like Vincent faced.

Loving Vincent movie Vincent Van Gogh painting in the rain

Vincent’s Final Letter

In the end, Jo writes to Armand touched by his acts after successfully receiving the letter from Gachet. She made a copy of the letter by Vincent that Armand had been carrying around all this time. It was only fair for him to read after he had done so much.

This is what the letter contained:

In the life of the painter, death may perhaps not be the most difficult thing. For myself, I declare I don’t know anything about it. But, the sight of the stars always makes me dream. Why I say to myself should those spots of light in the firmament bet inaccessible to us? Maybe we can take death to go to a star and to die peacefully of old age would be to go there on foot. For the moment, I am going to go to bed because it’s late, and I wish you goodnight and good luck with a handshake, your loving Vincent.

The Bitter Truth

Loving Vincent Movie’s final gavel drops with the following statement that reads itself on the ending placard.

In the 8 years between starting to paint and his death, Vincent painted over 800 paintings, only one of which was sold in his lifetime.

Isn’t that tragic?

It literally rips you apart when you think of it. How unfortunate was the poor artist! How unfortunate, many of us are! Trying to be heard all our lives, but no one is listening. All we find are deaf ears and blind eyes who can neither hear or see the work we do.

Vincent was posthumously proclaimed the father of modern art. The bloke was ahead of his time. It only makes you wonder if death’s the only thing that does you justice. That name and fame always end up staying behind. Nobody gets what they need, then what’s the point?

If you are an artist you are probably thinking, what of my time? All that I have invested will that be rewarded after I pass away? How is it fair?

You can order Loving Vincent movie from here:

The Illusion of a Real Camera in Loving Vincent

It is hard not to notice how the directors of Loving Vincent, Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman chose to showcase paintings as if they were shot on a real camera. Right from the effortless panning movement to zooming in from a distance, it all feels as if a camera found its way back to Vincent’s historical leaflet.

If that weren’t enough the sound department does an equally fine job, giving us an illusion that there indeed is a camera.

For instance, the very first scene that celebrates Vincent’s enormously famous painting The Starry Night. The frame seems to pan over the city literally bringing the painting alive. As it proceeds to meet the protagonist we could clearly hear the low whirring of insects and birds nestled in the tree from The Starry Night. As we proceed towards the sound of the city brimming with people’s talk, you could hear that whirring noise fade in the backdrop. I mean how careful is that! You can’t appreciate the sound editing and mixing enough.

Then the paintings have painstaking detail in them. Like they don’t even leave out the reflection of a man in a window pane. They have even captured the illusion of wind, smoke, clouds, shadows, reflections on water, of the tiniest of movements. How eyes look when they roll, how the shadows find their way into people’s faces when the light is falling from behind. How different people look when they are moving. The detailing is just magnificently meticulous.

All the memories in Loving Vincent have been done in black and white and they look absolutely stunning. They are simply pressed against reality.

The Extraordinary Music of Loving Vincent

Before I end this incessant ranting of admiration, I will take a moment to admire Clint Mansell’s extraordinary music. It gives you goosebumps. They have been beautifully composed and so well placed they are!

You are compelled to sway with the scene. That’s what true talent should make you do. To take you inside the movie to make you connect and relate. Loving Vincent movie does that owing to Mansell’s beautiful compositions.

You can listen to one of my favourites here:

The Final Verdict

Loving Vincent movie is literally the epitome of art itself. It is a brilliant tribute to one of the finest artists the world has ever seen. To those who don’t know him, it is a perfect way to get acquainted. I highly recommend watching Loving Vincent to understand, know and revere the guy who was way ahead of his time.

If you like the Loving Vincent analysis and review, please check out our other movie analyses

Phantom Thread Movie Review (2017) | Witness Powerhouse of Performance | Analysis and Spoilers

While there are movies out there unserious about filmmaking, there are some rare gems like the extraordinary Phantom Thread movie that is the exact opposite. There is so much going on in each frame of the flick that it leaves you extremely mesmerized.

While Phantom Thread is a movie that is bedecked by none other than the acting polymath Daniel Day-Lewis himself, he is guided none other than the colossal vision of Paul Thomas Anderson. Together these guys recreate the magic of There Will Be Blood again.

The Deadly Combo

The combination is deadly, you know it. They prove yet again why they are so revered not only in the industry but all across the globe. For a sleepless man who is a master at getting into the skin of his characters, who fills meaning into the profession of acting, sometimes it becomes hard to tell Daniel Day-Lewis apart from his characters.

Paul Thomas Anderson is a great director himself. He knows how well to leverage a dedicated actor like Daniel. It is filmmaking at its best whenever you see these two weave magic onscreen. Phantom Thread movie uses this golden opportunity properly.

Phantom Thread movie leaves you with a lot of questions. It is quite good frankly, because a good movie should make you think, and that’s what it does.

I am sure doubts still linger in your head, and you want a proper closure for all those hard to grasp bits. I hope to settle some of the daunting questions you might be left with after watching the flick. First, we will dive headfirst into the plot of Phantom Thread movie and try to figure it all out therefrom.

The Plot and Theme of Phantom Thread Movie (Spoilers)

The story of Phantom Thread movie dives into the head of a fastidious man who is peerless in his profession. A dressmaker he is who makes immaculate dresses that pass under his scanner in painstaking detail. He is a master at what he does as Daniel makes his character Reynolds Woodcock a reality.

For a great man to fall in love, as Gatsby had often reiterated (only if you keep re-reading) it has rarely ended well. With that Paul introduces a hint of love in the form of Alma played by Vicky Krieps who happens perchance to him when he least expected it. That’s how love happens when you overlook the reality that tacks along.

A house that doesn’t change is a dead house.

Alma

Alma walks into his life as an object of admiration. She wishes to be more but ends up becoming a plaything of an unfeeling monster of a man (monster is a relative term) who places his work well above everything else. And he has never been in love before. His unadulterated love for his work is evident by his success. He is well above it. But like all mortals on earth, he becomes smitten by one of his toys.

For the hungry boy, my name is Alma.

Unfortunately for him, it is a breathing toy who expects more of him. She is a person who walks in with her own dreams, clouding his vision with attention.

Alma can’t be overpowered because she has a voice of her own, a defiant brat when she’s mad. She tries to adjust to this newly found life of hers, but the poor thing could only take so much. You realize there’s nothing wrong with her. But that’s what marriage is – people trying to fit into one common tiny blanket together.

But for Reynolds, it is never about what others think of his dresses. It is about him, and only him. It makes him feel complete when he is able to produce a timeless piece.

Alma: Mrs. Vaughn is satisfied with the dress.
Reynolds: No one gives a tinker’s fucking curse about Mrs. Vaughn’s satisfaction.

Love is Poison

With the advent of Alma in the life of Reynolds, things change.

Her arrival has cast a very long shadow.

For the better part, we see Alma being submissive trying to fit in the life of Woodcock. But then she begins to realize how beastly Reynolds is and decides to tame him. Wanting to think like him for a second makes her realize why he does what he does. It is evident when together they force a dress out from a client. They are literally on the same page. But like every relationship, it is just a quality that matches and stands out contrasting to all the things that don’t.

Maybe he is the most demanding man.

Finding Love

It is hard for her to scooch herself in his air when he wishes things to be his way, unbothered and unfazed. That’s when the defiance happens as she finds some poisonous mushrooms and deliberately makes him ill. She wishes to take care of him, to pamper him wanting him to be completely his. Craving for possession – a misadventure of a relationship. Somehow her wanting that is just too, given the way Reynolds behaves even when she is around. It doesn’t change him a bit which is madding.

Is this an ambush? Are you sent here to ruin my evening? And possibly my entire life?

With that poison his work suffers as he falls to the ground, spoiling the dress he had worked so hard on. The absurdity lies in the part when you witness the callousness his sister or his coworkers depict for him when they are more worried about the dress than his well-being.

Reynolds life was devoid of love, and that’s why Alma was so keen on bringing warmth to him. His life was akin to a robot and you could see any minor interference dealing with Alma trying to make things better made him madder.

The Game of Power

Reynolds was used to having things a certain way, and anything that messed with it broke his trance.

The tea is going out. The interruption is staying right here with me.

With Alma around it was becoming difficult for him to cope with his profession. You know when you weaken a person, make him vulnerable you see their true colors. With him poisoned on the bed, he calls Alma his mother when she was taking care of him. The Phantom reflects for a split second making him feel at home.

Are you here? Are you always here? I miss you. I think about you all the time. I hear your voice say my name when I dream and when I wake up, there are tears streaming down my face.

Mother is the first thing you remember when you are in trouble when you are really down. Alma’s presence rekindles that love and care he felt when he was around his mother. With Alma to the rescue, he feels home, although what he does not approve of was the inconvenience when she bothered the demeanour he preferred.

I have given him what he desires most in return. Every piece of me.

Daniel Day-Lewis in Phantom Thread movie

Marriage and What Comes After

That feeling of home, made Reynolds realize that he could not survive without Alma. They marry and suddenly Alma becomes the boss of his life. She does all those things that bother him, makes all those noises on the dining table, doing all the things the way she pleased. They fight and they get along. That’s what relationship is – A symphony that constantly resonates and dissonates.

There is an air of quiet death in this house. I don’t like the way it smells.

Reynolds suddenly loses his power. The transfer of control happens. Her presence pokes him all the time as he fails to carry on the way he wishes to. The vision blemishes. But now he is left with no choice but to deal with it. But since he is a child at heart, he doesn’t know how to.

One day he goes to complain about how he has become this demon he did not expect to turn into.

I do not like to be turned away from.

You could tell even Cyril (Leslie Manville) is tired of his puerile behavior, when she lets Alma eavesdrop on him complaining about her. It is about time that he grows up is what Cyril, his sister, has been thinking all along as well.

She’s getting fat sitting around waiting for you to fall in love with her again.

But that bitching felt like the last straw to Alma as she once again resorts to poison.

Phantom Thread Movie Ending Explained

The final poison scene might have baffled a lot of viewers because it fizzles so many thoughts in your head.

  • A. you can see what’s going on.
  • B. You can hear their thoughts as well.

Whilst Alma prepares a poisoned omelet for Reynolds to eat, you can clearly see Reynolds well aware of it. He has realized that the first time he had been sick, it was Alma’s doing.

You are not cursed. You are loved by me.

There is an obvious tension in the air as Woodcock knowingly gulps the omelet to a waiting Alma.

It is all poetic and symbolic too – “I know that falling in love will kill me, but I will do it anyway.”

Further Explanation

I will explain further. Reynold has experienced that low time before when he was in his bed resigned and powerless. But that was also the time when he was close to his truer self. When he had witnessed his mother – a feeling of being himself, and not under the skin of some distant virtuoso. Alma was the girl who made him visit that transcendence. Though how painful it was for him, it was also quite relieving and elevating.

Reynolds could not be what he aspired to be when he was on his sick bed, but he was at least surrounded by love. It was relaxing and soothing as there was someone he loved, to take care of him. It wiped out the furrows he had on his brows for a while and that was something he secretly admired.

As Alma looked on, she seemed to be offering him a choice in the form of a poisoned omelet. Take it or leave it as if bluntly pointing out – “You either take my love or be deprived.” Love being love always wins as we see Reynolds deliberately putting a mouthful in and then subduing in her lap.

Kiss me, my girl, before I am sick.

Why Alma Didn’t Walk Away

You must be wondering why Alma did not just walk out of his life. While there are tons of instances all around us of why people are unable to move on from something, you can only relate to Alma’s mindset by all the things she says:

Reynolds has made my dreams come true.

When Alma had first set his eyes on him, she fell in love with him. But she came to face this unbreakable guy that was different from the rest. How did he manage to live such a reputable renowned life?

Alma: Why are you not married?
Reynolds: I make dresses.
Alma: You cannot be married when you make dresses?
Reynolds: I am certain I was never meant to marry. I am a confirmed bachelor. I am incurable.

She took that up as a challenge, to cure him of his illness. Forcing him into marriage, to open his arms wider for people to walk right in. Something nobody could do, a thing next to impossible. Life is a challenge, for Alma Reynolds became her life.

Presence of the Challenge

To be in love with him makes life no great mystery.

The presence of Reynolds in her life makes her feel out of the world. To break him as to find a place in his heart ends up becoming her only goal.

Alma puts everything she wishes of him in her final words when she poisons him:

I want you flat on your back. Helpless, tender, open with only me to help. And then I want you strong again. You’re not going to die. You might wish you’re going to die, but you’re not going to. You need to settle down a little.

The final line is the crux of the whole Phantom Thread movie. She has been trying to make him relax to lose that uptight facade that he has been donning all his life. It is repulsive to her, and she wishes to make him human again.

You can order Phantom Thread Movie here:

The Secret Behind the Name Phantom Thread

Probably the one question that might be bothering you would also be the title. Why Phantom Thread? What’s the significance that hides inside this vague moniker?

For a man to be like Reynolds Woodcock, you have to dangerously close to insanity. Leading a life he had sewn into his threads, Woodcock had committed himself wholly to a profession that’s simply unworldly to him.

For Reynolds, it is important to hide messages in the dresses he makes that are supposedly made for phantoms to read. It is like an artist signing his work off with a sigil for people in the posterity to find. A old habit that ends up becoming his muse.

You can sew almost anything into the canvas of a coat.

In a way, Reynolds depicts that it is meant for the ‘ghosts’ of time to read. Who is the ghost here? You guessed right, his mother whose breathing image we see in a fleeting shot during the time he was sick.

It’s comforting to think the dead are watching over the living. I don’t find that spooky at all.

The Validation

Every person needs validation. So is the case with a genius like Woodcock. There is this profound veneration he holds for his immaculate creations but as a sign of validation, he wishes them to be seen by his mother. Like a child who seeks validation for things he paints from his mother, Reynolds acts on similar lines. He wishes his creation to be timeless, to be seen by her dead mother and as a reverence, he pays tribute to her.

After the final scene, you see it is by being closer to death that this artist becomes his better self – this humble love beseeching being who appreciates life. Every great man is vulnerable. One could only paint their true colors when they are down on their knees. Alma achieves that by poisoning him.

The Final Verdict of Phantom Thread Movie

Phantom Thread movie is hands down fantastic. The detailing in the flick would simply blow you away. This is how movies should be made. You pay attention to any aspect of Phantom Thread movie, be it be the dresses, the lighting that complements the cinematography, the outstanding screenplay or the acting of the cast, it is all extremely well done. Understand it well and you might enjoy it even more.

You can read our other movie analyses too.

The Post Movie Review (2017) | Serving the Governed Not the Governors

Walks in with yet another engaging spectacle, Steven Spielberg is hands down a master at filmmaking. The extremely gifted man once again proves with The Post Movie that he is peerless at what he does. His work never ceases to paint flairs of extraordinaire. He is the one man who could make a simple conversation stand out. And there is so much inscribed in his frames that you can’t help but wonder how does he manage to pull it all off.

There’s a story he tells even in long winding conversations.  The Post Movie is full of such brilliant masterly koreros. Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep with their Oscar-bait presence, make all those chats stand out. There’s something about his direction that’s instantly uplifting. Even when he is not busy painting fiction like last years The BFG, he is pouring meaning into the mundane, shaping it and moulding into something delectable.

In a world of power that’s run by the corrupt, perches a voice that’s broiling to do the right thing. The Post movie bases itself on that very run, the pointlessness of a war that had edged itself precariously on the parapet of “let down”. The fact “we can’t show the world we lost” smothers the superpower dream and the United States government was finding it difficult to come clean. It was The New York Times who took the first plunge but the victor – The Washington Post who saw it all the way through.

The Post Movie Plot and Theme (Spoilers)

The Post narrates the true story of the Pentagon Papers that shook the very foundation of the US government when they were made public in 1971. It is built around all that took place inside the head of all the decision makers and the turmoil they were in when something as huge as the truth itself came along.

The Post movie kicks off in the year 1966 with a prologue showing Daniel Ellsberg (Matthew Rhys) accompanying US troops and documenting US military activities led by Robert McNamara (Bruce Greenwood). When speaking to President Lyndon Johnson he expresses how hopeless the Vietnam war was, and yet publicly speaking McNamara says the exact opposite.

The post movie still tom hanks

There was something about that blunt lie that shakes the very foundation on which Daniel was built. Unable to take it anymore he decides to let all the government secrets out in the open for the public to see. He photocopies classified reports that showcase the progress of Americans on Vietnam soil ever since the time of Harry S. Truman and then leaks it to The New York Times. Later he releases it to The Washington Post where a pissed off Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) was scouring for news.

Quality drives profitability.

It should be well noted the import of the papers. It is worth noticing how the director chose to run the camera literally with the Pentagon papers thus establishing the colossal importance of news. A world was about to go down for some really powerful people. You could literally feel the weight of the papers in that parcel that made its way to Ben’s desk.

Meryl Streep as Kay Graham

Katherine Graham or Kay (Meryl Streep) found a world on her shoulders when she took the reins of The Washington Post in her hands as the publisher and owner after her husband died. She was overpowered by some really strong men, and it was hard for her to cope with those who condescended her at all times. Be it be her advisors or the men who surrounded her.

In the beginning, there was this apparent tension as clouds of doubts hovered over her. It was important to show that owing to the huge decision boiling in the eventuality of the flick. Meryl nails it giving an Oscar-worthy performance yet again.

Meryl Streep in The Post movie

There are some really ingenious shots put in by Steven Spielberg when he chose to show a woman entering a room full of men. It spoke of contradiction. Even though words weren’t spoken, eyes spake ’em. There was an evident air of control that you could sense in that frame when Katherine takes her seat unable to speak herself out due to stress and hesitation.

News is the first rough draft of history.

You could sense her to be this vulnerable woman who was forced out of her way and flung into a room full of responsibilities. What people did not know was the undeniable fact that every person is totally capable of handling things once they get a hang of it.

There was also one scene where all the wives of men at great posts stood outside smoking, waiting and discussing trivial matters while this contrasting lady Kay Graham goes right through them all to meet with the ‘men’ to take a call. It is just truly inspiring for all those who thought there was a said place for women. She literally changed the very perspective people had about women.

Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee

Editor in Chief of The Washington Post is Ben Bradlee portrayed by Tom Hanks. He is rooting for a big news when the biggest of all news hits him in the face. A lot of shots are called by him in the flick but at the end of the day, the decision still stood with Kay.

Tom Hanks, the brilliant actor he is, adds in plenty of heft in the pacing story through his acting. He is still one of the best actors, hands down. Taking a seat like a boss, turning down people who aren’t useful, you could literally feel him turn into the Editor in Chief of The Washington Post.

But it is Ben Bagdikian (Bob Odenkirk) who is contacted by Daniel Ellsberg who flies to him to see the papers in person. It blows him away when he witnesses a room full of documents.

I always wanted to be part of a small rebellion.

The Challenge

The biggest challenge all the popular newspapers in United States faced was the government itself. When The New York Times had leaked the first received document, the government restricted the papers from publishing further by calling it an act of treason. Now more of those papers fell into the hands of The Washington Post, and it was a suicide mission for them if they still went ahead to publish.

So it all boiled down to the decision, the ultimate decision whether to post or not to. That decision was to be made by none other than Katherine herself. What made matters worse for her was the fact that she was good friends with Robert McNamara. Put in a position that demanded her to be truthful to the country, to be loyal to her friendship, despite being under the crosshair that could have destroyed the paper she had inherited, Katherine had the world spinning. She had to make a call.

The conversation between Ben and his wife Tony Bradlee (Sarah Paulson) about Kay being brave is something to watch out for.

To make this decision, to risk her fortune and the company that’s been her entire life, well I think that’s brave.

Then we had people constantly battling with her, advising her not to publish since it could decimate the company to tatters. People who looked down upon her, for not only being a woman, but for being incapable of taking a decision on her own.

He says we can’t, I say we can. There, you’re caught up.

Despite everything and a mind-numbing thrashing, she finally makes the right call by choosing to print.

My decision stands, and I’m going to bed.

She had just bugled the arrival of truth, and nothing could have put it better than the following dialogue:

The movie ends with a proper epilogue adding fuel to fire by winking at the Watergate scandal which ultimately led to the resignation of Nixon.

You can order The Post from here:

The Final Verdict

The Post movie needs to be celebrated not just for the fact of how convincingly it has been made and produced, but for its ability to be able to break something unbreakable. Even something as gargantuan as a government could be wrong. It is after all made with people. If they are corrupt, that’s what the governance would end up becoming.

The Post movie is a revolt that brims us up with hope that truth beats everything. You just have to take a stand and never back down even though how intimidating the enemy is.

The papers weigh a country’s conscience. If they are rigged or stomped down, nothing will ever be right again. It’s a movie that sets history right.

The Greatest Showman Review (2017) | Celebrating Show Business

The Greatest Showman is a musical feat. A movie that celebrates exactly what its name suggests – the life of P. T. Barnum slapped on a grandeur of musical awesomeness. If you are averse to contemporary music it might bother you a little bit, probably because the movie uses it everywhere. It’s built on hope which often separates the reality away giving you a rather vague insight into the life of Barnum that apparently had much more going. But if life were all about looking up, The Greatest Showman stands out hands down.

The Greatest Showman is quite entertaining and it will actually make you feel good when you come out of the theatre. There is more to it than it just being about a dreamer who took a bold and different route to success. The pioneer of showbusiness P. T. Barnum helped one see past their insecurities and turned it into something celebratory. It is a feat that’s great per se. The movie frolicks around on highs and lows to show us there’s no stopping someone who is convinced of his idea of success. Very satisfying!

The noblest art is that of making others happy.

The flick is brimming with energy. You can’t help yourself sway whenever a beat drops. When you talk about its choreography, it’s brilliantly done too, everything gorgeously arrayed that puts you right up there beaming you up with exhilaration.

The Greatest Showman Theme

The storyline is basically a biopic that tries to place Barnum in 1 hour and 45 minutes of screentime. It showcases him coming from nothing, becoming something and then struggling to hold on to it. There are ups and downs that often leave him ecstatic and shattered. It glances into his life often trying to skim how he had become a puppet to societal stratification. But the joyful thing to mark is that he smiles through it all.

The Greatest Showman Hugh Jackman

Hugh Jackman plays Barnum impeccably making him this powerful hopeful being who inspires everybody to come out of the closet and overcome personal deficiencies turning them into their strength. Even though one could debate about his motive not being entirely generous, Barnum saw something that people failed to see. He somehow managed to turn it into a profession breaking barriers of human capabilities.

No one ever made a difference by being like everyone else.

Here’s a list of all the songs from The Greatest Showman:

  1. The Greatest Show
  2. The Other Side
  3. A Million Dreams
  4. Never Enough
  5. Tightrope
  6. This is Me
  7. From Now On
  8. Come Alive
  9. Rewrite the Stars

You can order The Greatest Showman OST from here:

Hugh Jackman does justice to the legend and shines in the spotlight. Even though his Barnum feels too hopeful to be taken seriously, he fares great for a musical. His acting remains top-notch nevertheless.

Hyperbole isn’t the worst crime. Men suffer more from imagining too little than too much.

The screenplay of the flick is brilliant. There are plenty of great lines in it that will compel you to marvel at its beautiful play of words.

Downsides

If you take a look at the downsides of The Greatest Showman, there were plenty. To begin with, the flick felt fabricated on a contemporary musical style, which is something that takes your attention away from its lyrical juices. You can’t help but wish a piano or a violin to play when the mood is glum, but that rarely happens. There’s no way you could put it up against the likes of La La Land. It doesn’t tear you apart. Emotions in it don’t leave you hollow.

Another one of those things that nagged a little bit was the content of the circus. There’s no way the audience came just to watch the crew perform on songs. Songs felt more like fillers as if Michael Gracey the director couldn’t think of a better alternative to it. I don’t know like a humorous play or dramatic theatricalization could have at least filled it with some substance. It’s not the only thing you come to see in a circus.

They are laughing anyway, kid, so you might as well get paid.

There were a lot of things that were a little hard to digest too. But the movie shines out despite its issues.

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The Final Verdict

The Greatest Showman entertains you thus accomplishing what it was trying to. It isn’t emotionally spell-binding but it still is something when you try to sieve through the entertainment department. It’s grand and extravagant. The detailing, the costume are all painstakingly created and you can tell that by the way, it impresses you.

The story The Greatest Showman tells is pretty good. It fills you up with hope, that you too have a chance to do something out of the ordinary and maybe inspire others from your action. That world is a crooked place but you have to make the most of it. There are countless messages to take from the flick.

Although a musical might not do a person justice, it sure as hell tells a story that puts a smile on your face.

Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle Review (2017) | An Entertaining Upgrade

Suprise! Surprise! Jumanji resurrects in our very own gaming world and you know what? It’s not bad at all. Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle has all the things to entertain you despite its fantastical roots. That being said, there are elements in it that will make you scoff nevertheless, but isn’t that how this entertaining franchise has always been? Fanciful and scratching the surface of surrealism?

Plot of Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle (Spoilers)

Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle starts off lugging, with that same old game metamorphosing magically, syncing itself with technology. That’s how the franchise justifies its time leap, and it seems like that’s what’s going to happen in the long run as well. However, difficult it was on the eyes, you can always look beyond by branding it as just plain old “magic”.

So the plot features a certain Alex Vreeke from Brantford being sucked into the game in the year 1996 when the board game transforms itself into a video game cartridge to pique his interest. Later in the year 2016, four students from Brantford (Spencer, Fridge, Martha and Bethany) end up in detention together. They have been asked to clean up the room when they bump into the same Jumanji video game that we saw Alex play.

Characters and Avatars in Jumanji Game

While trying to choose the characters in the multi-player game they find out that they are unable to pick one of its characters. When they begin the game they all get sucked in. Each draped in their new gaming avatars.

Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle characters and avatars

So even though their appearance changes, persons inside them come with their own individual qualms. Apart from that, they also have their newly acquired skills and weaknesses.

Where’s the rest of me?

These are the avatars they become:

  • Spencer – Dr. Smolder Bravestone (explorer) – Dwayne Johnson
  • Fridge – Franklin “Mouse” Finbar (zoologist) – Kevin Hart
  • Martha – Ruby Roundhouse (commando) – Karen Gillan 
  • Bethany – Professor Sheldon “Shelly” Oberon (cartographer) – Jack Black

Now when you are playing a game, you are bestowed with lives. Here too, each character has three lives, confirmed when a hippo attacks Bethany killing him/her in the process, and a new revived Bethany falls from the sky. Each one of them has a tattoo depicting the lives they have.

Jaguar’s Eye

Since it’s a game they bump into an NPC (Non-playable character) named Nigel (Rhys Darby) who briefs them about the mission. Van Pelt (Bobby Cannavale) is after the Jaguar’s Eye, a jewel that would give him complete control over all the animals in Jumanji. Van Pelt is the same guy from the 1995 movie Jumanji however with all the transformation (the age leap), he has transformed too. In Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle, he has been introduced as a colleague of Smolder who has gone rogue.

jaguar's eye Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle movie

Decoding Nigel’s code, the crew realizes they have to call out “Jumanji” after placing the crystal on a Jaguar’s statue where it belongs to win the game and escape. That’s their only way out.

Martha: Are you gonna help, or are you too pretty?

Bethany: I am too pretty.

Lives are lost as difficulties arise during their gameplay. But they manage to hang in there till the end. They bump into Alex (Nick Jonas) from 1996 and realize that he went missing in the real world because he was stuck in Jumanji all this time in the avatar of Jefferson “Seaplane” McDonough. Alex had been living in Alan Parrish‘s (Robin Williams‘ from the prequel) treehouse.

Alex loses his only life when bit by a mosquito but Bethany performs CPR on him transferring one of her lives to resuscitate him. In a theatrical end, we find the team in a face off against real jaguars. In the nick of time, Smolder reaches the top of the Jaguar statue as Martha intentionally dies with the Jaguar’s eye so that she could revive and show up from the sky (talk about accuracy) with the jewel. Smolder catches her mid-air as everyone shouts Jumanji after returning the eye to the statue.

Smoldering!

Jumanji Ending Explained | How time worked for Alex

The game ends as players return to the real world. They are back in 2016 in the same detention room. However, it has been 20 years for Alex. He has aged and become Colin Hanks (one guy three characters! Whoa!) When the quadruple bumps into Alex it isn’t surprising that it takes Alex a while to recognize them, but weirdly enough he is spot on. His house that used to look ramshackle looks neat and tidy, and he has a kid too.

So what really happened?

Jumanji has its own timeline. It’s like a limbo where the time of the real world doesn’t matter. And when you are done, basically the game puts you back in your own time. So if you are playing it say in 2017 and you end up getting stuck there for like a century, but still win it eventually, the game will spit you out in 2017 some time after you started playing the game.

It goes on to show that Alex Vreeke had a regular life after the prologue. He went on to live the life he had missed in Jumanji. He did not go missing and his house was never derelict. For the viewers, I surmise it must have been somehow hard to digest watching Alex recognize all four so quickly. But it was done I would say in an okayish manner.

You can order Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle from here:

The Final Verdict

Overall Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle was done brilliantly. It was above average and packs in plenty of laughs. Above all, it makes you inquisitive all the time. It’s like a game after all, and if you are a gamer you will have a blast every second.

I was a big Jumanji fan ever since I bumped into it as a kid. The concept of playing a game that brings all its units to the real world is akin to bringing all your fancies to life. After all, everybody wishes to be stuck in one, in their favorite one, to nail that happy ending that they are often unable to find in real life.

Check out our other movie analyses too.

Ferdinand Movie Review (2017) | A Pacifist’s Tale in a Violent World

Surprisingly a good movie! I would be honest with you. From the trailers, I didn’t expect much from Ferdinand Movie.  But I was wonderstruck when I actually saw it. Watching it become a powerhouse of emotions as the movie progressed, I knew I had been dead wrong. That a movie should not be judged by its trailer, just as no book should be judged by its cover.

Ferdinand movie didn’t pack in as many jests as you find in animated movies nowadays, but it was a great entertainer nevertheless. It was successful in walking a tightrope of emotions. That’s where its true strength lurked. When you focus on other parts critically you realize there were tons of issues strewn around the movie as well. But all of that can be overlooked once you become the bull the movie cashes in on, and try to empathize with that creature who doesn’t share his dream based on his appearance, rather stands by his decision to see what others fail to.

Story and Characters

Not everyone is same. We have been wired differently. Whilst a father wishes to be something, his son might not share his dream. He might have a dream of his own. Everyone has a choice. That very fact forms the basis of Ferdinand movie.

You can’t decide or judge someone by their size or appearance. What you can’t see, their brain, in fact, holds the key to their vision.

Ferdinand movie wallpaper

Place that impactful storyline into animation and you have got an enjoyable hoot to savour. That’s what Ferdinand does with its bull, the protagonist voiced by John Cena. He is an out of place animal who doesn’t share other’s dreams.

Bullfighting in Ferdinand Movie

Either you are a fighter, or you are meat.

What you might call as someone’s dream is a brilliant mockery of materialism. In the movie, the dream of fellow bulls is to fight the matador. Whilst the bulls in the flick fail to see the pointlessness of it, (like all the people who consider bullfighting a sport) Ferdinand in his blatant sense of indifference towards the game, digs up the real truth behind it. They are all ending up getting slaughtered! Just as we had seen in Sausage Party, the blind followers are all prepping up to die.

Sure, you get to fight in a magnificent stage, but it’s just another chop shop!

Ferdinand movie uncovers the ugliness that surrounds the sport in a way that will leave you teary-eyed.

Ferdinand is all about saving the meek, helping others. He is finding it hard to explain it to others why he is the way he is. Doesn’t that chime in with life? I don’t know, like your very own? How many times have you felt that way? As if you are in someone’s else body, forced to live someone else’s dream. Are you fighting for it?

It’s good to see someone is. Ferdinand is willing to leave no stones unturned to make the world understand he is not like the others. He is different. Violence his not his place even though he has been bedecked with a body that leaves the onlookers marveling.

Look at your pecs! They are like two tiny bulls inside a bull.

But the world, being the world, judges Ferdinand by the way he looks and brands him as destructive.

A Glance at Life

Ferdinand is given a shot at identifying his life the way he wishes to live it. He finds it in a place right next to Nina voiced by Lily Day. That’s where he wishes to be – In a patch of land where a bull is chosen over a dog, Nina teaches Ferd the Nerd what love is all about.

Is this love? I love love.

It’s that taste of life that helps the bull in registering home – not where you are born but where you are supposed to be.

Ferdinand and Lupe in Ferdinand movie

Deprived of the life he desires to lead, Ferdinand is picked up and dropped at Ground zero once again. He ends up in Casa del Toro, the place that he had escaped from, to be prepped up for bullfighting, something he is not cut out for. Unable to understand what the fuss is all about Ferd tries to escape a bull’s fate, but ends up drawing himself closer to the inescapable sport. Lupe voiced by Kate McKinnon is one of those weird funny characters, who brings in most of the punches and stays close by.

El Primero (Miguel Angel Silvestre) is in search of a bull to fight his final fight. Marking Ferdinand as a perfect contender he awaits him in the center of all applause.

Even though the main villain brings that heightened sense of befitting contrast to Ferdinand’s character, you realize it is a typical cliched build-up that you have often seen in countless movies in the past. El Primero might have reminded you of Anton Ego from Ratatouille if only he had better words to say. The screenplay of the flick, unfortunately, isn’t impressive and hence framing him as a villain to remember is something you might want to reconsider.

The Final Showdown

What tears you apart is the final face-off that puts the bull against El Primero. While there’s an imminent death written in the frames, the demeanor of the bull is enough to shatter you into pieces. The multitude is busy cheering the one with the sword, but they easily forget that the one fighting without is a true champion.

Ferdinand refuses to fight back despite being instigated. There is this moment where he loses it and almost becomes what he dreads. He comes back to his senses when he steps on a flower and realizes that he is no matador. That he is no killer. He was never one. That nothing could make him go rogue. He submissively leaves himself at the mercy of the sword waiting to be lanced.

That scene would force you to erupt in tears if you have been holding them too long. It’s trying to say –

I will not stop being good. No matter what you do. I will die before succumbing.

It’s hard not to die inside a little when the matador decides to lance Ferdinand. That’s one of the saddest scenes in the movie as the bull puts out his heart to accept his fate. But he is saved by the very people who came to watch him die.

Eventually, we find the bull bringing in everyone to show them that one place that he had fallen in love with. That’s what you do. You open eyes of the people around to show them the magnificence of what you see.

ferdinand movie scene

Messages and Theme

There are plenty of messages inscribed in Ferdinand movie. Apart from those that have been mentioned earlier, it presses the vein of animal cruelty the most.

A lot of wrongdoings happen in the name of culture. You take any boisterous festival out there and you would end up finding something noxious clinging to it.

Things have been written in our flesh, our brains marked with all the conventions, that make parting with them difficult. But if we open our eyes, really open our eyes to see what’s being done in the name of religion, culture and conventions, we will perceive how many innocents suffer because of our drunken disregard.

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From the perspective of mankind all of the things we do seem justified. But when you start noticing things from the perspective of everything that lives and breathes, you begin to empathize. You realize it stands true for right about everything in our life.

“Until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.”

Issues with Ferdinand

Apart from the fact that Ferdinand does not score well in the screenplay enclave, it has a lot of other problems as well. The point where it introduces its characters Una, Dos and Cuatro seems a tad forced. There are a lot of times the humour fails to squeeze out a laugh. There are cheesy lines aplenty and a lot of cliched things strewn all across the movie that might bother some.

Also, Ferdinand is not bold enough to kill its characters. Like it resurrects Guapo even though it would have been an extraordinary icing to play with people’s emotions. Still, Ferdinand chooses to save its characters as if it aimed at making the movie entirely for kids in the first place. It’s a family movie that saves everyone and makes sure of all its happy endings in almost all of its frames.

That brings that dance-off scene to mind which was, by the way, totally unnecessary even though how hilarious it was.

The Final Verdict

Ferdinand movie is an eye-opener for all those who have been giving themselves a hard time in a place which is not theirs to hold. The bull is built on that non-violent Gandhian theory that will leave you insanely impressed. He is a pacifist who advocates it in a place that needs it the most.

It is great that the pointlessness of the bullfighting sport comes out in the open. Unfortunately, there are thousands of such festivals and sports celebrated all across the world. Fortunately, it’s a start, and that winds of change can only come from such empathizing depictions.

The message is loud and clear. The question is – are we listening?

Star Wars The Last Jedi Review (2017) | Epicness Continues

One word. Epic! Star Wars The Last Jedi promises goosebumps and it delivers exactly that on a silver platter. Episode VIII in the Star Wars saga has an extremely well-written story that gambols on different storylines to keep viewers interested. It has so many awe-inspiring moments in it to leave you wonderstruck, nay, starstruck with each scene that follows. Whether it be the inclusion of new characters or species, Star Wars The Last Jedi movie aces them all in a plot that’s simply befitting.

Direction of Star Wars The Last Jedi

You might know Rian Johnson from Looper fame. He is a fantastic director who carries a gradual enthralling pace when it comes to depicting frames. While others choose to run towards action, he lets it come of its own accord. That being said, Star Wars The Last Jedi movie has plenty of action but there’s not a single moment in it where you feel it has been rushed. Every section has a proper build-up which Rian creates to rope you in until it reaches fruition. When everything sieves in, it feels like as if each story meets its perfect end.

Yoda: The greatest teacher, failure is.

In terms of presentation, he scores the highest when he chooses to depict decimation in a light that lets things stand out. Yes, a nod to that final Crait fight in red and white. Simply spectacular!

Rian breaks free from all standards and conventions of cinema. He obliterates those customary fetters that we have become so accustomed to – seeing things happen the way they are supposed to happen. He toys with parallel storylines wherein an expected course of action doesn’t generally work as planned. To be honest, it all feels like life itself. How many times have you felt that way? Like when you expect something to happen and things don’t go as planned. There’s always Plan B for failures. Rian Johnson presses on that living and extant nerve.

You cannot overlook Rian’s genius even when portraying the force ‘connection’. Never for a second does he get into the eyes of the characters to show us what they were seeing, primarily because it is a notion intangible that binds them. You cannot depict them seeing each other in a crystal clear light. It’s a feeling to be felt.

Rey and Luke Skywalker

Reprising her role as Rey, Daisy Ridley once again proves why she was a perfect choice for a protagonist when she was signed for one of the most brilliant and successful running franchises of all times. To take the legacy forward Rey leaves no stones unturned and fits in her storyline that follows the events of The Force Awakens like a glove.

Rey and Luke in Star Wars The Last Jedi

I need someone to show me my place in all of this.

We find Rey learning ways of the Jedi from a reluctant Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill). It is a relentless struggle to bring Luke to train her and the director makes sure you understand the struggle really well. It is quite palpable when you look inside Luke’s brain and find out as to why he had decided to call it quits. The tension runs for a while, and though exhausting at times, it all builds up for its epic showdown.

The Balance between the Dark and the Light

The Last Jedi teases you more than once to make you truly believe the story that’s painted on the screen, forcing that layer of credibility, making you actually think that inclining to the Dark or the Light is only a thought away. And it builds itself around that quotient intelligibly. You get to know what Force is all about and what it all means through what Rey actually sees and feels.

Luke Skywalker: Breathe. Just breathe. Now reach out. What do you see?

Rey: Light. Darkness. A balance.

Luke Skywalker: It’s so much bigger.

That montage of frames Rian Johnson decided to go with, goes on to show how he wishes us all to have a glimpse of what we have been only registering in our thoughts for decades. That popular symbolic energy that permeates us has a form to be felt. Rian makes it all very tangible for us.

Kylo’s Tussle (Spoilers)

Whilst Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) is busy walking on the precipice of the forces, occasionally gleaming with that good guy spark, you realize it’s something Darth Vader was struggling with too in the past prequels. But Adam Driver simply nails it! With all the right expressions, the brawl in his head oozes out like a real struggle.

The Empire, your parents, the Resistance, the Sith, the Jedi…let the past die. Kill it, if you have to. That’s the only way to become what you are meant to be.

You can taste defeat in Rey’s hopeful face when she makes a theatrical broken heart sound real. It is as if you are rooting for Kylo for a second, counting on him to turn towards Light, and then your heart gets broken too. Rey and Ren make it all very relatable transporting you into their world.

To break Rey, Kylo does what any villain would do. Plucking that parentage card and playing it. Giving her hope, a darker one to coax her into joining hands with someone that connects.

You come from nothing. You are nothing. But not to me.

It is amazing how the creators have always managed to create dark as a tempting alternative to light. It feels so right and yet it is so wrong. Like a perfect balance! It’s good to see The Last Jedi milking it again.

The Resistance in Distress

You might think that’s the only story in the plot, but it expands as it oscillates between the one that’s holed up in the beginning frames. While Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher) is incapacitated, Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern) takes command.

With Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac) confined indoors the rebels rebel amongst themselves as he takes charge of the situation. There’s a Plan A still under wraps headed by Finn (John Boyega) which Poe wishes to see through.

I was raised to fight. For the first time I have something to fight for.

Finn finds a pleasant company in Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran) who by the way is just perfect for him.

Rose Tico in Star Wars The Last Jedi

That’s how we are going to win. Not fighting what we hate, but saving what we love.

It is brilliant what Rian does with the story when he chooses to confuse the audience by showing Holdo in a bad light, (letting us watch her from Poe’s perspective) and then resuscitates her as the one who was actually trying to help.  She was the Plan B that was playing in the backdrop all along. Watch out for her badass assault on First Order! That was out of the blue!

The Epic Showdown

Whilst at a point you feel that the movie is about to end, you realize the action is just getting started. Everything takes us and prepares us for one final showdown that’s as epic as it gets. Not only does it do justice to the title but it also does justice to Luke, the protagonist of prequels, paying as much homage to him as one could by giving him a single shot at fame in a limited time.

He shows up like a true Jedi he is, finally overcoming his recalcitrance to face the First Order’s suicidal onslaught. What follows is an eye-boggling moment to be witnessed only in theatres for true mirth.

Every word of what you just said was wrong.

You cannot also overlook what Resistance does in desperate times. Whatever limited resources they had in their hands they use it nevertheless. By heading to an old base in Crait, they revive the old. Despite surrounded by obsolete and battered stuff, they still give it a shot, fighting with what little they had, but fighting nevertheless.

The Final Verdict

Star Wars The Last Jedi is a brilliant addition to one of the most venerated series of all times. It does the franchise the most justice a movie could possibly do.

The flick also pays tribute to titular characters and goes on to include more, literally aiming the gun at impending sequels. It reprises Falcon, Chewbacca, the AT-ST, Yoda, and lets us relive a lost era. New additions are great too. Porgs are simply the cutest!

Here you can order your own life-sized porg:

There are plenty of epic moments in Star Wars The Last Jedi that you cannot simply forget.

Snoke: You are no Vader. You are just a child in a mask.

The most impressive one is hands down the way Snoke gets slaughtered. Not to mention the final showdown where Luke shows up like a one-man army. Despite the teary end to Luke’s bit, his passing away doesn’t feel painful. It was in a way fulfilling as if he was waiting for a purpose all this time, to slide the torch to his posterity before he left.

See you around kid.

Star Wars The Last Jedi is a beautiful movie that shouldn’t be missed.

Go ahead and watch this one at once if you haven’t still. May the force be with you.

Wonder Movie Review (2017) | Always Choose Kind

A wonder-full movie! Wonder movie is based on R. J. Palacio‘s debut novel. Boy! Has it been adapted brilliantly! With Jacob Tremblay doing justice to the role of Auggie, this movie is going to melt your heart on countless occasions. It is riveting throughout and lets you relate to its characters.

Unlike other movies where a protagonist-perspective is often brought into play for right about everything, Wonder movie doesn’t revolve around just Auggie, but all the people whose lives get affected owing to him.

Some lines are right there up with you. They sear you with a disheartening pang that is hard to escape if you are completely engrossed in the movie. There are numerous occasions in Wonder movie to make you all teary-eyed, and then there are plenty to lift up your spirits too.

When given the choice between being right or being kind, choose kind.

The fact that the writer understands people so well will make you want to read her even more. Either through her books or her adapted work. There is so much she has to say, and so much she understands that it is hard not to applaud her brain. More power to her! Keep impressing us with more of you Palacio!

Direction of Wonder Movie

If you have watched The Perks of Being a Wallflower you are already aware of the alluring style of Stephen Chbosky‘s direction. He has a superpower to make his films really enchanting. There is something magical in the way he depicts drama that makes you connect almost instantly.

The cast he has chosen here is simply amazing. Right from Nate, (Owen Wilson) the cool dad to the mother, Isabel (Julia Roberts) whose life has taken a major setback owing to Auggie’s arrival, not to forget the overlooked brave sister Via (Izabela Vidovic) and the struggling friend Jack Will (Noah Jupe). All of them have been extremely well executed in frames that together tell a melting story.

still of Wonder movie family selfie

Chbosky experiments with the story he has, by playing it in the form of a book. Giving characters in the movie their own section of frames, where their own perspectives come into play. While what Via speaks into the ears of Auggie is inaudible to the parents, we find out about what was said in Via’s section. It is a brilliant way of showing a movie that keeps the audience on their toes. Also, it goes on to show how unaware we are about someone else’s perspective until we become them and until we start empathizing with their characters.

Like the fact that Via seemed really understanding from one look, and that if she was okay with all the attention Auggie got, is not only the viewer’s idea about her, but even that of the parent’s. It goes on to say – what we see, or what appears isn’t how things are. Brilliantly directed!

Jacob Tremblay as Auggie

While you can’t talk enough about this talented young kid, Jacob Tremblay keeps delivering every time he shows up in a movie. Whilst it is still hard to ignore his performances in Room and Before I Wake, he shows up how good he is in this beauty of a flick too. And how adorable he is! You can’t love him enough!

I am pretty sure you are secretly wishing Jacob Tremblay to not grow up. He is so cute, and that isn’t the only notion that’s winning him all the accolades but his ability to become versatile characters, so young.

Precepts are rules for really important things.

It is hard not to feel for Auggie when he is trying to find a place amongst others. He places fear and awkwardness in a contrasting optimistic light and visualizes himself how he wishes to be looked at. That’s one psychological lesson and  smart life hack right there – When people are staring at you, you turn it into something powerful.

All the Hope

It is amazing how this little lad is brimming with hope at all times. His pain so understandable, and his ecstasy immensely enjoyable! Feeling for him is something you cannot avoid throughout. Watching him rise is like watching your own kid rise. When you watch him struggle you just want to be there for him. Now that’s the power of acting! Making you feel for painted characters, and tying it all to your thread.

I know you don’t always like it, but I love it. It’s my son’s face.

At one point you are thinking what’s going on in his head? It’s all so relatable. If you put yourself in the shoes of Auggie everything the child is thinking and everything the child is going through can be empathized with. You think about all the thoughts that were said out loud, and that weren’t, and you realize it is an insanely depressing situation. You realize the huge import of finding your place in a world that considers a certain face to be akin to normal, like there’s a standard to everything we see.

To take birth in abnormality, and to face the very definition of normalcy is bound to emit sparks. Even though you are aware of what all things are going to happen, to witness it through the eyes of a small child is exceedingly painful.

On being asked what his superpower would be, Auggie says,

I’d be invisible.

And you can understand why he chose that answer! Poor child!

Julia Roberts as Isabel

Julia Roberts gives a great performance as Isabel. You can read genuine pain, trouble, and concern on her face when Auggie isn’t doing fine. It is hard not to put yourself in the shoes of Isabel.

Wonder movie Quotes

Wonder movie plants you in her feet and you become her. All the emotions, they go through you, and you are crying with her, feeling happy for Auggie when he makes a new friend.

Dear God, please let them be nice to him.

There are lines in Wonder that will shake you up, scintillate your soul, and connect with you on an emotional level. All of them have been beautifully imagined.

We all have marks on our faces. (pointing towards face) This is the map that shows us where we are going. (pointing towards heart) This is the map that shows us where you have been.

Isabel says all the right words to a child going through a tough time. But in doing so she misses out parenting a girl who has learned to take care of herself – her other child.

Izabela Vidovic as Via

Izabela Vidovic’s portrayal for Via can’t be forgotten either. Whilst at one hand, you find this really strong image of a girl who is completely okay with her parents focusing all their attention on the child who deserves all the attention. On the other hand, you find her completely vulnerable and missing out on all the love.

If they stare let them stare. You can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.

Via is insanely strong and you realize that her problems, however, small, insignificant and mundane they might appear, are problems too. That she too deserves an eye in a family that is struggling to be normal, and be consumed and accepted by the world as one of their own.

When you look at Via’s character you realize that she has been put in a really smart move. It is a contrasting image that Wonder movie shows when they try to show how a person gets neglected even when you are focusing on someone who really needs it.

Other Cherishable Characters

Among other characters brilliantly woven are that of Jack Will’s and Julian’s (Bryce Gheisar‘s). While Jack Will is a child like any other, who is torn apart in a world that’s twisted and a world that isn’t, he shows what any other child would do in a situation he is put in. While he makes mistakes and amends them, it is endearing to watch the reconciliation in the flick.

The latter is the problem child, who shows us the bitter truth. He is like the reality eyeing us up good. You cannot enforce kindness in people, but you can help them learn their own lessons of humanity.

You can order Wonder 2017 Movie from here:

Then you cannot also overlook the cooperating brainy principal Mr. Tushman (Mandy Patinkin) who does all the right thing, saying all the right words, and deals with crooked people with a hard to imitate kindness.

still from Wonder movie

“I think there should be a rule that everyone in the world should get a standing ovation at least once in their lives.”

The Final Verdict

You cannot just commend one person for turning Wonder into something that’s astoundingly powerful. It is a team effort that deserves countless accolades. I guess it would be safe to say that “they should make more movies!”

There are so many life lessons imbibed in this tale that it feels like education, and whatever it stands for.

If you really want to see what people are, all you have to do is look.

Wonder movie will leave you intensely satisfied when you leave the theatre. Go watch this one!

Coco Movie Review (2017) | Remember the Forgotten

Pixar still doesn’t fail to amaze! With fancy that could put the fanciful to shame, Coco movie invites applause even by hopping into different universes. It launches with the theme of a dreamer Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) who is bent on becoming something he is destined to. Just when you think the movie is going to be all about it, it turns into something more exciting as it progresses.

There are tons of messages inscribed in its alluring run, and even if you choose to overlook them all, you still end up getting an extraordinary passionate tale of love, hope, despair, and valour. All in all, it presses on the penultimate lesson that it carries forever in its womb – Remember the forgotten!

When life gets me down, I play my guitar. The rest of the world may follow the rules, but I must follow my heart.

The Olaf Debacle

First things first, I was in one of the theatres that showed Olaf’s Frozen Adventure prior to Coco Movie. Whilst I am sure it must have miffed a lot of people, owing to how long it played for a short, the short animated film wasn’t really bad exactly. I watched people leave the theatre wondering if they were in the right one. Many got up complaining that they didn’t pay to watch a musical.

There it was! The problem with Olaf! It ran for too long and to make matters worse, it was a musical. Not everybody likes musicals! If at all they had gone for some super humour, people would have actually liked the idea of watching two movies by paying for one. But it turns out to be excruciatingly punishing. Even though, I felt it was kind of alright!

The Coco Movie Magic

Coco uplifts the downed spirits almost immediately when it starts off with a stunner. Watching Miguel’s life is like framing yours in a movie frame, if you have a family who fails to get you. There is the Xolo Dog Dante, with a tongue that wags like a tail, who forever accompanies Miguel wherever he goes. He will bring a smile to your face almost immediately.

You are going to get me in trouble Dante. Someone could hear me! I wish someone wanted to hear me, other than you.

Coco movie xolo dog Dante

Miguel carries in himself a dream to be a singer, convinced it is in his blood.

You know that feeling like there’s a song in the air and it’s playing just for you?

His gusto isn’t shared by the members of his family, and his dream is literally shunned by everyone owing to a past tragedy. Despite their austerity, he still ends up falling in love with it. You know, some things you don’t have control over. You can’t really explain people why you love doing a thing, it is just inbred!

Music tore her family apart. Shoes brought them together.

Day of the Dead (Spoilers)

Convinced that his great-great-grandfather was none other than the insanely renowned Ernesto de la Cruz voiced by Benjamin Bratt, Miguel wishes to prove himself by playing for the crowd for a talent show on the Day of the Dead.

No one was going to hand me my future. It was up to me to reach for my dream, grab it tight and make it come true.

He sneaks into Ernesto de la Cruz’s tomb and steals his guitar. But when he strums it, he ends up entering the Land of the Dead. There he discovers that nobody from the world of the living is able to see him and his dog, and vice versa. But the dead are able to.

Tonight is about family.

Figuring out that the only way to get back to the world of the living is by receiving blessings of his dead family on an Aztec Marigold petal, and that if he stayed up to sunrise he would become one of the deads himself, he approaches Imelda (Alanna Ubach) his great-great-grandmother.  Imelda grants him her blessing however on a condition that requires him not to pursue music. Convinced that Ernesto would think otherwise, he decides to pursue him in the land of the dead.

I am not like the rest of my family. There’s something that makes me different.

Hector

There he encounters Hector voiced by Gael Garcia Bernal who is keen on visiting the Day of the Dead for the mere fact that he was being forgotten. Being forgotten in the land of the dead meant an unavoidable passing away into eternity.

coco movie miguel dante and hector

With promises to help Miguel meet Ernesto, in exchange for letting him take his photo to the land of the living, so that he could see his daughter before passing away, they embark on a journey together.

It has been an honor. I hope you die real soon.

Hector is created as a great companion to begin with, but with Miguel lying to him to fulfill his own motive of meeting Ernesto, he ends up getting trapped in a quandary. Unable to convince Miguel to let his photo be taken to the land of the living, he finds himself pursuing Miguel as the boy finally meets Ernesto.

Our memories have to be passed down.

The Climactic Truth About Ernesto de la Cruz

As Miguel ends up meeting and declaring himself as the great-great-grandson of Ernesto de la Cruz, we perceive him being accepted owing to the beautiful voice he has. However, soon we find out that there’s a huge plot twist. He isn’t exactly the hero he poses to be. In fact, he is an impostor who had poisoned Hector when the latter had decided to go back to be with his family. He had even stolen his guitar and had become famous by using Hector’s works calling them his own.

Hector is a poor bloke deprived of name, fame and his family, misunderstood for not coming back, in fact, he was meaning to, before he was murdered. He was deprived of the credit that he truly deserved.

You don’t have to forgive him, but we shouldn’t forget him.

The reason why Hector was diminishing gradually was because he wasn’t recognized by anyone from the world of the living. Let alone his daughter, Coco (Ana Ofelia Murguia), for whom he used to dedicate all his songs. Coco, by the way, is Miguel’s great-Granny who is really old and is suffering from memory loss due to old age.

Ernesto, the prick he is, takes the photo of Hector and throws him into a pit alongside Miguel. There Miguel bonds with his true great-great-grandfather.

One cannot deny who one is meant to be.

With the help of Dante, who turns into his spirit animal, an alebrije, and his dead family, Miguel and Hector are saved. They upend Ernesto’s Sunrise concert and expose him in front of the crowd, as he is crushed by a giant bell just as he was killed in the real world – a poetic justice. However, they are unable to get to Hector’s last photograph as it falls down and disappears.

The Final Moments of Coco Movie

Imelda blesses Miguel to return to the world of the living where he sparks the memory of Coco who is on the verge of forgetting Hector.

Miguel, I give you my blessing, to go home and to forget about music? And never forget how much your family cares for you.

Miguel sings the same song, her father (Hector) used to sing for her when she was a child. It reignites the lost memory helping her to remember, thus bringing Hector back to life….uh….back to the world of the dead i.e. stopping him from passing away into eternity.

Remember me, though I have to say goodbye. Remember me, don’t let it make you cry. For even if I’m far away, I hold you in my heart. I sing a secret song to you, each night we are apart. Remember me, though I have to travel far. Remember me, each time you hear a sad guitar. Know that I’m with you, the only way that I can be, Until you are in my arms again, remember me.

Coco shows him the missing face from the photograph she had kept for herself because of her love for her father. Miguel’s family accepts Miguel as part of their family again.

all characters from coco movie

Before the curtain falls we fast forward to a time where Coco is no longer there, but her saved letters written by Hector has helped Miguel to publicly denounce Ernesto and revere Hector with all the credit posthumously.

You can order Coco Movie with a bonus content here:

Overlooking Fantasy

Even if you choose to overlook the fantastical story woven in the world of the dead, you still register Coco movie as an impactful story about a child trying to unveil a long overlooked family secret. It is a secret that could change lives!

You take it as his mission, as if Miguel found out the truth behind his true grand-grand-grandpa by coincidence, owing to his love for music, and by interacting with Coco, and you still have a solid proof story to feast upon.

But that’s the beauty of fantasy! It takes you into a world of magic just to elaborate a fair point, and when you get it, you realize how taut it becomes in its structure.

The Forgotten Theory

Pixar has once again tingled our emotions by taking a shot at the forgotten theory, as it had done in the past with Inside Out. It’s a topic that’s immensely saddening. I couldn’t control my emotions when it flared that shot.

Coco movie connected to me on a personal level on so many occasions. I have often wondered about how some people’s deeds resound till eternity. And that’s like an achievement per se when people are remembering you for ages to come. My maternal grandfather late Dr. Ajit Narayan Singh Tomar was a writer like me, but little of his work is left in today’s world. I tried to track him down, but there’s nothing substantial on the internet about him today. For the mere fact that internet hadn’t blossomed during his time, when he was alive and in good health (he had gone blind during old age).

Now I am left with his memories alone, that aren’t as strong as the light he used to propel. I feel really awful that people don’t know him anymore, despite the amazing books he had written and published. I can’t track down his work, and I see people turning a blind eye towards him. As if he was akin to Hector, mistreated during his time.

I don’t want people to be forgotten. The really good ones, they deserve our living time, whether or not there’s an eternity waiting to swallow them. Above all, I don’t want me forgotten, whether or not I do something great in life ahead. It is an intensely disheartening thing! It impels us in a pit that’s devoid of love.

The Final Verdict

A standing ovation to Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina for helming this beauty of a flick. Three cheers for the entire team who made this entire project possible! Coco movie deserves all the love there is in the world. A fantastic film that should not be missed.

Highly recommended!

Qarib Qarib Singlle Review (2017) | Keeping Up with the Gifted Irrfan Khan

Tanuja Chandra‘s Qarib Qarib Singlle places Irrfan in a light we love to see him in – the ballsy carefree reckless man who doesn’t hold back from talking his heart out. The flick is built on romance but the chemistry, unfortunately, doesn’t have the right spark to make you really feel it. On one hand, Irrfan simply mesmerizes you with his realistic performance. On the other hand, there is Parvathy who fails to impress you as much.

Qarib Qarib Singlle is subtly put on the building block of moving on. It tries to pass down the message of how important it is to move on even though things from the past still cling to you. If you don’t let go, you end up chafing your present. The biggest strength of Qarib Qarib Singlle is that it is laconic where it matters the most. It allows the silence to do most of the talking. While it is a virtue well played by Tanuja Chandra, I believe, it might have also baffled some of the audience.

On a personal level, I felt the climax was brilliantly pulled off. That every movie should learn from the subtlety that went on in its ending. It leaves you brooding, speaking a thousand words without actually saying anything. It is a beautifully painted picture that tells us how a reconciliation scene should be properly theatricalized.

Direction of Qarib Qarib Singlle Movie

While Tanuja Chandra has garnered experience aplenty throughout her 22 years of cinematic run, she has forever kept herself on the learning curve. She is open to experiments, a fact evident through her work. She has literally grown as a director.

But still a lot of ground is left to cover, so you can tell by the unwanted shots she has ended up nodding to.

qarib qarib singlle movie wallpaper

Like some deliberate shots where you literally feel the pointlessness of placing small bulbs in front of the camera to deliberately milk the bokeh. You can picture her cinematographer asking her – “How about I take this shot like this?”

She chooses to mess with the “fourth wall” as in a way letting the protagonist talk to the audience. Although it isn’t intended for the audience in reality and is a bold decision per se, it just doesn’t feel right. What makes the work on the fourth wall really shoddy is Parvathy’s disconnect. She seems conscious when she talks, not to mention the slight camera zoom in, which appears to be clearly done on a software.

If we look at the bright side of Tanuja’s direction, she has learned to curtail the obvious from her frames, a strength which a lot of directors today are still struggling with. It is with time people move towards becoming better versions of themselves. Qarib Qarib Singlle is like a conch blaring of her arrival nay her revival, in a country that’s learning to revere the changing face of Cinema.

Irrfan Khan as Yogi

It is hard to cover Irrfan in words. He has become this peerless dome of perfection who is hard to keep up with. You put anyone against him, if they are not good enough, it simply shows.

The character Irrfan plays here is that of Yogi. He plays a lot of him taking liberty with his acts and creates this endearing character that is quite candid in his ways. Yogi’s superlative strength is in the way he treats the people he meets. He is a down to earth bloke who truly enjoys life as he lives it. At the same time, he is clumsy too as he makes a dozen mistakes in the wake of his existence.

Qarib Qarib Singlle Movie Irrfan Khan Still

The best thing is that he doesn’t take things as seriously as we often tend to. There is no problem in the world that’s so huge that it doesn’t have a workaround.

Yogi is literally ogling us to be like him, to sport a carefree attitude even when things go south on you. To appreciate little things in life, to talk, really talk with people, with strangers as you bump into them, making them forget all their problems. To tag people along your ride making life less miserable for them and to keep smiling and appreciating people despite how bitter life might become.

Parvathy as Jaya

While we have a man so relaxed and leading an uncomplaining life, we have the exact opposite Jaya, an uptight girl who is drowning in the sea of her insecurities. She has a past she is clinging on to. Moving on doesn’t feel right to her. She has been pushed so much that she has learned to compromise with everything, listening to right about everything.

Jaya keeps talking to his dead hubby breaking the fourth wall on us occasionally in a way asking for his permission in everything she does. Opening up to finally let someone in, she decides to do what the world around her is doing – finding a partner. That’s how Yogi happens.

still of Parvathy as Jaya in Qarib Qarib Singlle

To be really honest, there are a lot of times you feel disconnected owing to Parvathy’s performance. The way she is supposed to react to a thing sometimes feels not up to the mark.

However, good, she looks onscreen alongside him, in the end, you are left feeling, maybe Parvathy wasn’t the right choice for the flick. Since Jaya was the protagonist, her role demanded a heightened sense of charisma, so that one could start relating to her character almost immediately. But somehow it was difficult to stay on the same page with her. You fail to empathize with her emotions because she clearly doesn’t appear to be having any.

The Ending Explained (Spoilers)

The melodrama has been smartly pushed to the end of the flick so that the audience is allowed ample time to fall in love with the characters just as the characters fall for each other. It is written in emotions as you begin to feel how both Jaya and Yogi aren’t ready to move on with their lives. Even though they secretly want to, they are happy with the way things are. Grown accustomed to their usual way of living.

Yogi, the guy who has issues moving on, still carries tokens of memories from his past girlfriend in his pocket. He is okay with the life he has chosen to lead by keeping things from his past, occasionally bumping into them and letting his past take a piece of him. Then there is Jaya, who still talks to her dead husband, still uses his name on her password. Both of them are struggling with it unknowingly.

They are yet to understand what they have been doing. In the finality of meeting their exes, both of them end up hurting each other, only to realize the real value of moving on. They have no clue whatsoever of how things would pan out if only they chose to come to terms with the good things in their past, and chose to move on.

Exes Messing with Your Life Since Forever

In an uncaring theatrical display of emotions, Jaya bursts out losing it at Yogi, for making everything about him. That the whole trip was intended just for him, when in reality Jaya had agreed to come with him only for the sake of meeting her ex in Gangtok. Yogi’s terse reply forces her to see her own flaws too. The good in all that venting is that she becomes what she was unable to become – bold!

Irrfan and Parvathy in Qarib Qarib Singlle Movie

Meeting with an ex isn’t easy, and is a downward tumble. Whilst we see Yogi noticing how he has influenced all his girlfriends so much that they were unable to forget him, he comes to terms with himself, impressed by how good or bad the life had turned for them. The whole trip in his head was to see how the people he had affected so much were faring in life. Even though he realizes that some were fine, some weren’t, there were elements of him in every life nevertheless.

Happy and content with the bottom line that people never really move on in reality, that they keep the good things close to their heart even when they move on, Yogi ends up finding out how he had influenced Jaya too, who had clearly fallen in love with him, from the blog she had made about him. It should be well noted that Jaya had finally stopped clinging on to her dead husband as well when we find her coming to terms with him in a final goodbye after which she stops to look at the fourth wall.

In the Gandola Lift

Yogi then pursues her eventually running into her in a Gandola lift that he doesn’t miss this time. It, in a way, depicts how serious he has become about the relationship. That he is keen on loving her back and not letting life decide his fate this time.

We see Jaya in tears in the lift. It is fathomable that things didn’t go well for her either. As stated before, meeting an ex isn’t really easy. It’s headed nowhere, but the good news is that the lift they are on, is definitely going somewhere. With that, the movie ends.

The Final Verdict

Qarib Qarib Singlle might have been a play at a dating app, but what it becomes eventually is something huge.

It is like almost shouting at us that everyone in life is “Qarib Qarib Singlle” only. Everyone is having a hard time moving on. While we can’t really do anything about the past, one must choose to take the good from it and move on. That’s one lesson that the flick hides in its alluring storyline.

I am pretty sure Tanuja Chandra finally feels validated in today’s feminist era. It is great that time is doing justice to her at last. Watch this flick for its humour, for Irrfan and for its intense messages.

Check out our other Indian Cinema Reviews as well.

Check out the trailer of Qarib Qarib Singlle movie here:

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