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Tag: Christopher Nolan

Independence Day Resurgence Review (2016) | As Bad As It Gets

What a colossal disaster! Independence Day Resurgence turns out to be a huge bummer. Given the crazy levels Independence Day had managed to scintillate in us, we were expecting something as huge as the prequel. Unfortunately it is nothing compared to its epic first installment. The fact that it doesn’t even come close to a decent alien movie will make you resent it even more.


There isn’t just one downside to pinpoint because the whole movie is strewn with countless shortcomings. Beginning with the shoddy direction of Roland Emmerich, you might at once take it from Independence Day Resurgence that the guy’s still living in the 80s era. Any effort becomes an exercise in futility if you are not thoughtful enough. Roland showcases his childish unspooled head through reckless frames as he defines the prime basis of his movie, which happens to be nothing but bringing back the aliens and go shooting at them “ptchoo ptchoo”.

There are so many cheesy dialogues in the movie, feigned heroism from protagonists, weird reprisal plans, and plenty of role revivals that it is hard to take the movie seriously even for a second. There are hundreds of moments in the movie where you will go, “Are you kidding me?”


The screenplay is the worst. When all Madam President Lanford, played by Sela Ward, could manage at crucial moments,

“Let’s do it”

without giving an eye to repercussions; You could not help but imagine if something like this happens to us in reality, we are doomed for sure.

Everybody keeps reminding you every now and then that the events are actually taking place 20 years after. They use 20 years so many times that it could end up becoming a drinking game for you.

Bill Pullman, as President Whitmore, keeps showing up at places where he is not needed, and everybody just lets him pass. There is one African dude who kills Aliens with swords and says:

“You have to get them from behind.”

still of Deobia Oparei as Dikembe Umbutu in Independence Day Resurgence

It becomes so lame and cheesy with dialogues like that that you have to watch the Independence Day Resurgence to really believe it.

Jessie T. Usher is a bad replacement of Will Smith who is shoehorned just for the sake of Will remnants. Choosing Suicide Squad over Independence Day Resurgence is one of the best decisions of Will, hands down.

Including China seems very much forced. Putting in Chinese actors just for the sake of moolah is quite apparent to be candid.


Whilst at one end we see painstaking efforts from great directors like Christopher Nolan, James Cameron and Ridley Scott making next to impeccable alien movies, it is sad to see how Roland Emmerich doesn’t give two rats about what you want to see.

The only bright side to the movie could be that you get to see many characters reprise their roles. It might fling you in some nostalgic daydreaming. That and some cool visuals when the alien mother-ship tries to land on Earth. Everything else is simply stupid.

There is nothing serious going on in Independence Day: Resurgence. You can skip this any day.

Check out the trailer of Independence Day: Resurgence movie here:

Interstellar Review (2014)

Not long ago, I watched a featurette with excerpts from the movie Interstellar, which showed the gargantuan amount of work and sweat Nolan brethren, Kip Thorne and others put in whilst exploring the behaviour of a black hole. The crisp attention and the minute details they did not overlook flabbergasted me beyond limit. So hopeful was written all over my head. And Nolan never disappoints.


Strewn with science, this movie not only takes you on a joy ride, it educates you as well. The concept of space-time singularity pervades throughout the flick as we witness a superb simulation of a black hole, and it doesn’t stop at just that. We go into it. Yes, through the eyes of our protagonist for the first time, we witness a distinct theoretical world that has found pragmatism. An impeccable representation of Tesseract with threads of time.

The best thing about Nolan is the enormity of the project he takes. The script is so beautifully written that it rivets you right from the start. The concept is like magic, a miracle happening in a distant galaxy. As the story unfolds it makes you feel as if you are getting closer to finding answers to our existence finally. The plot however has something else in store for you. And it is a big fat blunt satire on our loneliness. We are alone and all we have is each other. That is the penultimate truth.

Wormhole was never explored like this before. How time plays tricks on you, powerful representation of anomalies, the wickedness of human mind when left alone in despair(that Damon bit), how the music of nature (the rain, the thunder and the cricket chirping noise) makes you feel home, the conundrum of our purpose, the humour of TARS, the physics that touches almost every part in the flick, the poetry of the brave and wise through Dylan Thomas’s words, superb lamenting conversations, and the brain-wrecking revelations in the end – every little detail has been exemplified with proper logical explanations and shown on a platter of sensations.

Emotional surge is strong, and with a power pack performance by McConnaughey everything uplifts. Bits of a father-daughter melodrama are the most feeling kind. Shatters you from the inside, as you empathize with the protagonist’s tears. Zimmer touches your heart with his profound score. Notes are so brilliant that they put you right into the flick. This too would sit amongst Zimmer’s best works.

It is one of the most ambitious projects that would be remembered in impending debates for the intricacies it touches and the science it explores. Nolan is certainly one of a kind director, a great gift to mankind, a wise man who wouldn’t go gentle into that good night. Kudos to yet another mammoth achievement!