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Eddie the Eagle Review (2016) | Never Stop Dreaming

Truly inspirational! Eddie the Eagle is an inspiring biopic about following your dreams despite the world trying to pull you down. The movie justifies all those maxims you might have come across growing up like – “Follow your dreams!”, “Never give up!” and all those perseverance clichés. But the most important one that I take out from the movie is – “Celebrate every little success”.


Looking at the bright insightful eyes of young Eddie where dreams skulked somewhere deep down, scouring persistently for his life’s true objective, your heart might end up brimming up with empathy for the poor lad. Also, looking at his gusto to settle on a dream, his constant search as he zeroes in on what he truly wants to become might leave you disappointed in yourself.

Did you once have a passion you were never able give a proper form to? Something that made you so happy, and yet you decided to listen to those who inadvertently stopped you from doing it? Well Eddie never listened to anybody but his heart, and that made all the difference.


Eddie the Eagle tries to weigh in on the biopic of the real Michael Edwards in a delightful mien. It will let you bag all the good feels as the movie goes on jumping around in them Eddie shoes. The journey starts off in a pleasant manner but there is that hurdle in the form of Terry, Eddie’s dad played by Keith Allen who constantly tries to dissuade him from doing what Eddie really loves.

“Are you trying to tell me you never had a dream when you were a kid, Dad?”

He is instantly reflective of the world, something that is trying to stop one from achieving one’s ultimate goal. Our lives are inundated with such characters who are pressing us constantly to steer from our path. It is a good thing that Terry is there in the movie and that he never approved of him that makes Eddie the Eagle further powerful as he says he loves to prove people wrong.

Eddie the Eagle struggles profusely as he tries in his own candid way to get himself the spot everybody denies him. But there was no stopping him, the perseverance he shows to achieve is worth commendable.


There are plenty of brilliant acts in the movie. A pleasant side-plot that Hugh Jackman runs is endearing to watch. Christopher Walken and Jim Broadbent cameo were lovely.

One short parley with Matti Nykänen played by Edvin Endre is downright outstanding. Beautiful lines lurk in their confab, and you can’t help but marvel at the colossal importance of it.

still of Hugh Jackman and Taron Egerton in Eddie the Eagle movie

If we do less than our best with the whole world watching, it will kill us inside.


The movie’s melodrama is a bit questionable. It doesn’t fling anything gut-wrenching at you. Hugh Jackman’s bar fight scene looks like strangely concocted in a clichéd fashion. Taron Egerton often goes in and out of his character multiple times. However does create his version of Eddie beautifully with that constant frown and that wide jaw framing.

Another thing that cannot be completely overlooked is that the beauty of the sport hasn’t been milked enough. For a guy who has set his eyes on something so huge as ski-jumping there has to be a story to it, or if there isn’t, we needed a better screenplay coming from Eddie The Eagle justifying his love for the sport. The film misses both. It goes too light for a dream so big.

Also, eventually as the movie comes to fruition it vexes the viewers into questioning whether Eddie the Eagle was crazy or completely sane. The way the movie was depicted right from the start would have you believe that he was alright but then afterwards it was kind of hard to tell.

still of Taron Egerton with the real Eddie Michael Edwards

It also, in an attempt to deliberately dodge the question of Eddie’s progress, fails to show where Eddie really stood. The fact that it’s okay to come last should have been milked more because that was actually the crux on which the movie was based. Celebrating defeating himself, his own personal record was what overjoyed him more, which I think required more screen time.

Also, there was a lot of fact changing going on that distorted the real Eddie the Eagle, Michael Edward. As Michael Edward puts it that it clicked with his life only 5% which raises brows at its accuracy.


Eddie the Eagle might not be a hero one hunts for in a movie, as he always ends up coming last, but there is a lot of heroism one could derive from him, with his free spirit, his perseverance, his attitude, and his constant pursuit for the stars.

You can check out the trailer of Eddie the Eagle here:

The Jungle Book Review (2016)

Adorable and adhering to the tale.


The Jungle Book has a special place in our hearts. Some fail to fathom the hype in our heads. We have waited impatiently for this movie to release and jog us down the forgotten memory lane ever since the news broke loose. The sole reason: 1989 show Jungle Book Shonen Mowgli! The dubbed TV show used to be our all-time favourite. Its outspread wings covered more than 20 languages all across the globe, a commendable feat to score even during that span. The acclaim was such that its song would be on every child’s lips. That explains our inane fandom behind it.

Coming across the Rudyard Kipling excerpt was enthralling too as images from the anime would come running down to fill the voids. Every character had a face. Every word had a voice. My fanatic knew no bound when I heard it was going big screen.


Now that we have finally arrived at a juncture where Jon Favreau has successfully helmed the gorgeous telling story to justify the awesome Kipling book, it is hard not to give him an ovation. With a superb CGI that walks hand in hand with realistic looking animals and endearing voiceovers, The Jungle Book era seems to have finally met a new high. The kind we, as diehard fans, were looking for. Whilst little has been done to mould the plot, which is by the way just perfect, we are racing down to meet exceptional twists and turns in its impending installments. Way to go Favreau!


Shere Khan is simply a badass. He carries a demonic mien that will give you the chills looking at him. Idris Elba takes him to fearsome heights. Baloo’s entry is well thought of and perfected by Bill Murray. Ben Kingsley imparts a thoughtful grim demeanour to Bagheera. You cannot ignore Christopher Walken’s perfect voice for King Louie. He puts life into that animal. Lupita as Raksha is magnificent. Adorable wolf-cubs in the movie will fill your heart up with delight.

Screenplay is kind of average, sticking to origins at times, sometimes swaying, but not really that powerful.


The parts that I didn’t like much were these trivial insignificant things which I choose to ignore:

Starting off with Neel Sethi, we could have done better. The lad, although great in resemblance, doesn’t really fit the bill. He looks absent emotionally as he if knew he was surrounded by CGI and not the real deal. Favreau fails to milk his emotions enough. Sentient things seemed aloof. Sometimes the CGI would dwindle when showing movements of animals and things would awkwardly move into the animated horizon. But still it all held up pretty fine. The end result we get is The Jungle Book we have always wanted as a kid.

Now that we have a darker version under the anvils (The Andy Serkis version) it would be intriguing to see towards which abyss this tale steers toward.