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Tag: comedy

American Ultra Review (2015)

Watching American Ultra was like reading a comic book. Not a really good one though. The average sorts. It was fun whilst it lasted.


As we take the reins of the joy ride, we find characters reeking of normalcy in the starting bit, if we overlook the battered protagonist in the prologue for a second. We think everything is going fine then boom comes the jackhammer, and the story takes a colossal twist. It unfurls into a bigger plot that tells you that you have been looking at it all wrong. Comical factors pop in and you at once understand, “Oh! So it is going to pitter-patter like that.” You switch that mode on overlooking everything then, all the elements that constitute to form a good movie. Yes, it isn’t a good movie.


There is some humour in the movie, yes. They try to make you laugh with some extraordinary characters like John Leguizamo’s Rose which was brilliant. Topher Grace is great as Adrian Yates. Laugher tries to enter the theatrical juncture only to compel you into hating him more. Jesse Eisenberg is exceptional as Mike Howell. You couldn’t have found a better actor to play the confused Mike. Good job there!


Comes with a pretty nonsensical clichéd concept of turning an agent with a code word, which we have seen many times in a bad Disney movie, this one started heading towards disaster right then and thereon. The music further broils it further by going into juvenile trenches with upbeats trying to rescue the flick whenever action came. Editing of American Ultra was well, okay, as it focused on dire elements alone, and decided not to bore you with a constant adrenaline.


The chemistry Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg try to weave with this was good though. It keeps you engaged. With all the cheesy dialogues and stupid gore you still manage to rivet yourself to your seats. I loved the fact that despite everything Mike yapped about, Phoebe would always listen to each word he said with rapt attention.

However, eventually Max Landis doesn’t go original with the writing, and it ends up like a clichéd tale which is good only for one-time watching.

Asterix and Obelix: Mansion of the Gods Review (2014)

Asterix and the gang ventures into 3D animated waters for the first time, and I must say it was quite delightful to watch them breathe alive on the big screen. All those big shiny noses and their clumsy acts look just brilliant in CGI.

Asterix and Obelix: Mansion of the Gods wouldn’t disappoint you. It is funny, featuring slapstick comedy, more of a situational provocation brought to you by the Roman invasion and the debatable empty heads of the Gauls. The plot is well written and is taken from the comic The Mansion of the Gods. The relentless Caesar walks in again with a master plan to ingest the Gaulish by building Mansion of the Gods, a new territory near their village for the Romans to populate. The story saunters around to and fro as both parties keep fighting with each other for the land.

A majority of the scenes in the beginning have been stretched, and sometimes the movie topples into the non-funny zone. But still the low comedy manages to beam up the down. Every character in the movie is a hoot. Caesar brings in the grim but the people who surround him wouldn’t make him look deadly. Someone or something would do something stupid every now and then and you would end up in fits of laughter.

The fun doesn’t stop at any point. A lot of fish slaps, cloud brawls, boar hunting and fake-fighting drive in the hilarious nail. Although you feel the ending dies out pretty quickly, you still get a brilliant feast to devour, as you laugh your way out of the theatre with a contended look.

A really entertaining flick. Kids are going to love it. It would be a great way to tell them the legacy of Asterix if they haven’t come across the comic hero hitherto.

What We Did on Our Holiday Review (2014)

What We Did on Our Holiday is downright adorable.

What makes this movie a hoot? Three adorable children who comprehend the world with their own little brains, see relationships with their own beady innocent eyes, and act on their reckless instincts and innocent unbloomed knowledge. What We Did on Our Holiday is a delightful perspective into the abyss of the broken that skims its aftermath gorgeously.

David Tennant looks the right kind of perplexed in the comedy trying to figure out his children and marriage whilst Rosamund Pike complements him beautifully with her engaged acting. Ben Miller as Gavin is brilliant as well. Billy Connolly ices the funny storyline with his pizzazz and brilliant comic timing.

The screenplay is witty, subtle and snappy. The good thing about its humour is that the entire film, unlike other comedies, is not build on a slapstick foundation. The theme of the movie sometimes goes really thoughtful from sheer comedy which further furbishes the rhythm. The plot will make you giggle per se without any extra addition to the story.

If you look at the downsides, sometimes you do hope the drama to be a little bit more grave. It lacks profundity, but considering it a Comedy, this fact can be overlooked.

A brilliant comedy that is compelled to traverse the ‘outstanding category’ by the mere cuteness rush of Harriet Turnbull and Bobby Smalldridge. This Andy Hamilton and Guy Jenkin project is a definite go go!