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Money Monster Review (2016)

Money Monster starts off as a good thriller but gradually slithers into its bizarre grubbiness.


Jodie Foster’s thriller is based upon big organizations stripping people off of their money, and getting away with it, until one ballsy guy decides to come up with a gun in his hand to get some real answers. The movie is continuously and narrowly saved by its contemporary feel, occasional humour and the way it boldly scales some uncharted territories which seems both stupid and plausible at times.

What the Money Monster profusely lacks is the lustre of a good drama, where we fail to read the thoughts of its characters. Even though George Clooney and Julia Roberts were a fair fit for their roles, Jack O’ Connell doesn’t reek of an apparent tension. He misses out on portraying emotions of a guy with nowhere to go. There isn’t a grave flair to his act, presence of which might have helped us to put a pin on him as a disturbed soul.

Money Monster fares well in the plot enclave, where things keep escalating at every juncture. The gravity of the situation however goes for a toss when a weird role reversal happens, which was supposed to be the high point of the movie. Jodie Foster fails to properly depict why Kyle becomes all of a sudden so important to Lee. Confused? Spoilers follow below:



So it all starts off really well. With Clooney in the front page, Julia Roberts in his ears, with a show that was as flashy as the theatrics people need to get lured towards the stock business. In comes Jack O’Connell as Kyle Budwell, a guy who invested everything he had by listening to Clooney’s banter of why investing in IBIS, a promising budding company, was a great idea. With a bigger player pulling the company’s strings, Walt Camby (Dominic West), the real culprit behind IBIS plummeting goes hiding. What follows is a guy looking for answers and a seemingly empty Lee Gates (George Clooney) forgetting all about a formidable bomb wrapped around his chest, also about the psychotic guy with a trigger to his fate, trying to help him out get one. He is willing to do anything in order to get to Camby to get some real answers instead of the word ‘glitch’, and that could include even standing behind the perpetrator to save him, the guy who was threatening to take his life some minutes ago.

Things go down those impalpable roads from where there is no return, the moment Lee Gates starts worrying about Kyle and tries to help him instead, pulling the cameraman Lenny into the stream as well. Police-thoughts get lost in the short sojourn that Lee decides to take with Kyle. However, the intrusion of the world on the roads was very credible, and brilliantly shot.

Overall things in Money Monster sieve in like a fair story, and how the world behaves to an outbreak like that, which is justly shown. Editing is on a roll. Screenplay quite average.


Money Monster is a good thrilling flick which does really well when it comes to entertaining. You just wish a little profundity and digestible material to have lingered there, and it would have fared even better.

Tomorrowland Review (2015)

Bird soars!

Disney’s fast paced sci-fi adventure Tomorrowland is an entertaining package. With a great fantastical story in its vanguard, the flick unfurls into a beauty thanks to powerful performances by Clooney, Hugh Laurie and the brilliant Britt Robertson. What constantly gallops the story is its mystery quotient that unfolds gorgeously with luster, amazement and pizzazz. Britt lets you see everything with her eyes of awe as you sit on her saddle to perceive the beauty of an unseen futuristic world that is not only downright advanced but marvelous too.

Tomorrowland is something we have always dreamt of. A place where limits of the mundane don’t bind us. We are free to choose our profession and use ideas to build something beautiful without inhibitions from stuff that bring us down – malice, regulations and confinements.

As a kid, I have always wanted to split open the world’s mystery and walk, with open arms, into the magical dimension of what-ifs. The possibility of the existence of different dimensions in our own has always beamed me up. The part that follows Britt discovering the pin that shows her Tomorrowland is an excellent reflection of our childhood fantasies. How many times have I dreamt of finding something that took me away from all this! Also the frames that follow Britt literally globe-trotting to see the future are visually majestic.

This movie skims the surface of dimensions, portals, and time travel subtly, without prodding into it like pros. This could be counted as a con to the movie. However, it being a Disney flick the specifics can be overlooked. Also, at times you feel the profundity factor missing from the movie, but not for once does the cast drop its guard. Excellent performances I would say buffed up everything, not to mention the concept that keeps you riveted.

Kabooms happening in the middle of the light and the crowd not caring, people disappearing without people noticing, not capturing the world’s reactions are some of the instants that would make you think out loud, “Really?” The dark is completely absent from the movie. There is no time where people sit and brood for a while about the happenings. Even the animation sometimes looks…well really animated. But that was the kind of movie it was supposed to be. A Disney movie!

Screenplay is great, with the majority of the melodrama brought in to play by the animate Athena, and Frank taking things up from there. Hugh Laurie as Nix is exceptional with his villainy touch. His reflection on mankind’s recklessness was really something.

Overall a good movie! Worth a watch!