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A Monster Calls Movie Review (2016) | Battling Your Inner Monsters

A Monster Calls is a dramatic stunner. It squirms your insides when you try to empathize with its protagonist, one hell of a child actor, Lewis MacDougall. Its evident story happens between its lines, as it takes refuge of a child’s fancy to expound some of life’s biggest lessons – expressing yourself as you are, accepting a pitfall and coming to terms with it.

The movie is based on an enthralling book of the same name by Patrick Ness that actually originated from an idea by Siobhan Dowd.

Cardinal Theme of A Monster Calls

There are two facades to the human brain. The one, that is the sane one, says things that you really mean. Then there is the other one, your daft side that keeps interposing and writing off decisions laid down by the first.  It is a constant battle between them that affects your choices, that plays your mood to its tune. This might sound crazy to a grown up who has the reins of his brains well sought and unknotted, who is often not vexed by his choices. (That’s too rare again!) But to a child whose thoughts run rampant, it is simply huge.

The negative and the positive thoughts that keep curdling inside you wage wars trying to cloud what you really wanna do or say. And that’s where the movie’s true theme resides. In those hollows of vexation!

image of felicity jones as mum and Lewis MacDougall as Conor in a monster calls movie

What you really mean, the purest form of it all comes when you are feeling a true uninfluenced feel. The movie tries to bring its protagonist to terms with his actual pious veracity, and it only concludes when its job gets done.

J. A. Bayona’s Engaging Direction

It’s official! There’s no director better than J. A. Bayona who could successfully unsheathe qualm and disquiet from a child and then present it in the most beautiful way possible. We saw that happen in the havocking nature pillage The Impossible in 2012 when he made us cry tears of rekindling joy, and of course in the stunning 2007 horror The Orphanage, which was Bayona’s debut film.

To bring out the natural flair of Lewis’ acting prowess Bayona brims up his life with ample loner shots before bringing the Monster in. His direction is so pleasantly lucid that you find yourself reading a child’s thoughts on the go. It has proper focus to dribble emotions right into your hearts.

A Monster Calls walks in with three, nay four, extraordinary stories with hidden meanings and messages. All of them are beautifully done with outstanding CGI. The Monster appears very real too.

Plot of A Monster Calls Movie (Spoilers Ahead)

To begin with the prologue we find Conor (Lewis) staring at a tree. He is constantly miffed by a nerve-racking dream. In it he finds his mother portrayed by Felicity Jones caving in to an annihilating earthquake. It swallows her up, leaving him helpless and stranded in the process. We find him leaving for school, preparing his own breakfast, dressing himself up for school, in short, taking care of himself. His mother is sick, and it is up to him to look after himself. With that you can almost see how Conor’s nightmare is perfectly poetic and in line with his biggest fears.

He summons up a monster voiced brilliantly by Liam Neeson who presses on telling him three stories for extricating Conor’s nightmare. All of these stories are strewn across the movie and in context with things happening with his life. The tree monster claims that since it was itself the common element in every tale, it knew very well what went on in those tales.

Three Stories of Tree Monster

The first story is about a kingdom that was miffed by vile creatures. A king loses all his sons except one to them, who grows up to become a warrior. Before he comes of age however, the king marries a beautiful young woman. Soon the king dies and the world believes that it was her who had poisoned the king. To keep the reins of the kingdom in her hands, she plots to marry the prince. However, the prince runs away with a farm girl who he was supposedly in love with. They stop to rest under a tree (the monster).

On waking up, he finds the farm girl murdered. Declaring that it was the queen who had murdered her and convincing fellow farmers of it, he wages war against her along with them. The tree monster awakes and joins the attacking mob, however the monster saves the queen in the process carrying her to a far away land. The reason the tree monster saves the queen is because it saw the prince killing the farm girl to snatch the throne wrongfully.

The above story reflects the life of Conor as well, when we are introduced to his grandmother whom he abhors profusely.

Second Story of Apothecary and Parson

The second crucial story is the one that deals with an apothecary, a guy who is inclined to treat diseases and ailments using conventional methodologies. Fighting him off is a new world parson who discourages everybody from going to apothecary for treatment. He stops the parson from cutting down a healing tree (the monster tree) that could have allowed him to cure any disease in the world.

However, one day Parson’s two daughters become really sick and all his attempts to cure them goes in vain. When nothing works he finally falls down to his knees seeking apothecary for his help. The apothecary refuses him when he finds out that the parson is ready to sell his faith and whatever he stood for, just for the sake of saving his own daughters.

The tree monster surprisingly awakens to decimate the parson’s house even though clearly apothecary seemed at fault for not helping the parson. The monster believed that if the parson hadn’t been so selfish in the first place, he would have been able to save both his daughters by allowing the apothecary to cut him down. He wasn’t staying true to himself by deteriorating from his path, and so he needed to be punished for it.

In the real world, Conor destroys Grandma’s house believing it to be Parson’s. When his grandma finds it, she doesn’t punish him for it, since she considers it a mere ripple against what’s imminent.

The Third Story of Invisibility

The third story was supposed to be about a boy being invisible. It actually happens when Conor is tired of being invisible. When everyone (including his mother) keeps treating him as if there was nothing wrong with his mother, as if he did not deserve to know what was befalling her. The fact that he already knew that his mother had cancer made it even sadder. On being bullied once again, he breaks all hell loose on his predator, by calling up the monster and beating the hell out of him.

As an aftermath, he finds the whole world looking at him, of him becoming visible, of everybody knowing about him, of the principal acknowledging his presence.

You can pre-order A Monster Calls Movie here:


The Fourth Story: Conor’s Nightmare

As mentioned before there were actually four stories, the fourth one being Conor’s acknowledgment of his biggest nightmares. It is summoned by the monster actually that recreates the exact setup Conor used to imagine, and re-imagine as his nightmare. His biggest nightmare, however, wasn’t letting his mum fall into the maws of abyss, but was that he wished it all to get over. Like an innocent brain wishing a thing and phase to pass, he had secretly wished for his mother to die. It killed him, wondering if he had unknowingly brought that fate upon her. The second sane sacred brain of his that hadn’t had the chance to accept the unacceptable finally gets a shot at understanding the impending disaster, when he is pushed on by the monster to actually feel the pain. The unstoppable cancer then does its job.

You see in all the above stories, the common element was always the tree monster. Even though Conor accepted its existence as a mere fancy, he used it to justify all of his acts. In the end, we get to know through the artistic portrayals of his mother’s drawings that the monster, and all the characters of his story were actually figments of his mother’s imagination, that she had once used to narrate him stories of.

image of conor sleeping under the tree monster in a monster calls

Amazing Parts

One of the best lines from the movie is when Conor’s mum understands. She says that she knows and fathoms everything that went inside the head of Conor. In one of the frames, she is shown actually nodding to the monster who by the way doesn’t exist. But is in a way suggestive of how mum comprehended everything that the little lad went through.

It is hard not to marvel at the magnificent water color paintings in the movie. The fact its paintings were created as a result of blowing water paint on the paper made it appear even more gorgeous. The CGI is absolutely ravishing too. Stories are brilliantly played out giving the story its innate perspective.

The most destructive scenes from A Monster Calls is, I believe, is when Conor tries to reason with her mother why the tree monster couldn’t save her, when it was supposed to? It’s hard to stop your tears of dam from breaking then. Also, when he runs wild on finding out that her death was inexorable.

The Final Verdict

A Monster Calls is an absolute wonder. It is a movie that fits the shoes of the actual book just fine. To help it achieve that is of course Lewis MacDougall’s brilliant acting, and Liam Neeson’s grave voice, and also the movie’s exceptional CGI. Transitions that go on inside the frames of all the stories are simply awe-inspiring as well.

Drama of the movie is simply top-notch. I would recommend this movie to everyone.

You can check out the trailer of A Monster Calls Movie here:

Joy Review (2015) | Truly inspirational

What an inspiring flick! Joy is simply awe-inspiring.

Jennifer Lawrence is a girl with the golden goose. She never fails to deliver. Her portrayals are powerful. Her eyes are so riveting that it is hard not to empathize with the pain she wears. Her demeanour dons a skin that is hard not to relate to and she makes you sway to her rhythm. The natural act she puts on is unmatched.

DIRECTION OF JOY MOVIE

David O’ Russell cashes in on Lawrence just right. To helm Joy as a character so marred by spears of life that she forgets her true talents is what he tries to manifest. Bludgeoning her further are intricacies that end up in a chain reaction and pile her under the boulders of responsibilities. That’s where the flick takes off. It is a pleasant perspective taken in a diegetic tone by her grandma Mimi, played by Diane Ladd, an optimist with a very kind heart, sadly clouded like any grandmother is. Sidelined and unseen she keeps pointing out the good in her, and occasionally making Joy believe that she was special.

“Maybe your dreams are on a hold right now.”

ABOUT DREAMS

The bit about creation was an eye-opener. On behalf of all the creators across the world, I would like to thank Russell to have given it a proper coverage. If we don’t look at the reel life for a second and focus on the real, so many of us have dreams that we started up with, a natural flair that promised us silently our true purpose in life, but alas life happened to us and we got skimmed to the footpath, diverged.

Russell’s take is just brilliant when he focuses on the pointlessness of relations, tangled ways of the living, and the insanity of it all. He subtly delves into the territory of epiphany with Joy’s dreams, the only point I felt the flick’s balance missing as he tries to blend in melodrama and humour at the same time. The epiphany bit sadly needed more emphasis.

However what unfurls thereon is a constant struggle to prove the mettle, the malice in commerce and the hopelessness that doesn’t seem to stop, until it does. It is quite inspiring for people who have put their dreams on hold. There are so many people who point their fingers at you when you are doing something good, succeeding at it, so many near ones who reek of jealousy and try to pull you down, something which Russell captures magnificently.

He uses exceptional screenplay to dignify the fallen talent, and weaves some great words. The rest is picked up by the cast really well. There are bits that shatter you to pieces, despair that boils you up but you can’t simply help but marvel at the perseverance of Joy as she fights everything and comes out a victor.

If you wanna feel inspired just go for it!