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Joy Review (2015) | Truly inspirational

What an inspiring flick! Joy is simply awe-inspiring.

Jennifer Lawrence is a girl with the golden goose. She never fails to deliver. Her portrayals are powerful. Her eyes are so riveting that it is hard not to empathize with the pain she wears. Her demeanour dons a skin that is hard not to relate to and she makes you sway to her rhythm. The natural act she puts on is unmatched.


David O’ Russell cashes in on Lawrence just right. To helm Joy as a character so marred by spears of life that she forgets her true talents is what he tries to manifest. Bludgeoning her further are intricacies that end up in a chain reaction and pile her under the boulders of responsibilities. That’s where the flick takes off. It is a pleasant perspective taken in a diegetic tone by her grandma Mimi, played by Diane Ladd, an optimist with a very kind heart, sadly clouded like any grandmother is. Sidelined and unseen she keeps pointing out the good in her, and occasionally making Joy believe that she was special.

“Maybe your dreams are on a hold right now.”


The bit about creation was an eye-opener. On behalf of all the creators across the world, I would like to thank Russell to have given it a proper coverage. If we don’t look at the reel life for a second and focus on the real, so many of us have dreams that we started up with, a natural flair that promised us silently our true purpose in life, but alas life happened to us and we got skimmed to the footpath, diverged.

Russell’s take is just brilliant when he focuses on the pointlessness of relations, tangled ways of the living, and the insanity of it all. He subtly delves into the territory of epiphany with Joy’s dreams, the only point I felt the flick’s balance missing as he tries to blend in melodrama and humour at the same time. The epiphany bit sadly needed more emphasis.

However what unfurls thereon is a constant struggle to prove the mettle, the malice in commerce and the hopelessness that doesn’t seem to stop, until it does. It is quite inspiring for people who have put their dreams on hold. There are so many people who point their fingers at you when you are doing something good, succeeding at it, so many near ones who reek of jealousy and try to pull you down, something which Russell captures magnificently.

He uses exceptional screenplay to dignify the fallen talent, and weaves some great words. The rest is picked up by the cast really well. There are bits that shatter you to pieces, despair that boils you up but you can’t simply help but marvel at the perseverance of Joy as she fights everything and comes out a victor.

If you wanna feel inspired just go for it!

In the Heart of the Sea Review (2015)

“My soul is dead.”

A poetic and arresting take on one of the deadliest fictional water beasts.

Nathaniel Philbrick’s In the Heart of the Sea is an entirely different take on Moby Dick, a different vantage that pays tribute to the most beloved tales of all times. The plot begins with Herman Melville played by a bearded Ben Whishaw visiting Nickerson, a survivor of the Whaleship Essex that went down owing to a tragedy that befell the entire crew when they encountered a gigantic sperm whale. Melville is bent on squeezing out the horror from Nickerson’s eyes into his leaflets because he believes it to be one of the greatest stories he has ever come across.

Philbrick’s perspective is exceptional. Ron Howard cashes in on it just fine. He follows the tale with eye threatening close ups and water-shots to jackhammer the dread quotient. Wonderful whale shots have been captured. Essex-sailing, the squall, whale-hunting have been depicted splendidly. It was a joy to watch the beast breathe alive for the first time in the sea. The size of that thing! The satellite shot ensured the audience scaled it amidst puny boats.

The better part of the movie runs in a diegesis which has been brilliantly written. The score often moves around the soothing notes of a viola that makes the flick a heartwarming watch. Whales have been subtly shown, never given a proper focus, reflecting – just like you would be bewitched by its swiftness in real life. The beast is a beauty! Tiniest of details on its flank have been manifested subtly. Then there is that badass tail. Watch that beauty surge!

What In the Heart of the Sea fails to milk is the “Chase-Pollard” rivalry. It had no Rush charm to it. Coffin’s role too seemed like a cameo which could have possibly unfurled into a possible brilliant feud. The young Nickerson played by Tom Holland was simply an eye in a tale. His character adds little value to an ongoing stream. Tom is an outstanding actor however he gets lost under the doldrums of their unfortunate tragedy, and often gets overshadowed by the movie’s protagonists. Matthew Joy’s character seemed like a crucial build; however Murphy wasn’t allowed to show off his acting prowess. Flick’s editing made sure of that.


One of the hardest choices Chase has to make when he finally gets a clean shot on the whale and he chooses not to take it. Whilst the writer leaves that bit for viewer interpretation, it is quite poetic if you really look at it. Chase was convinced they were flung into the jaws of chaos owing to the job they did. He throws the idea to Pollard in one of the finest conversations they had in the entire movie. He starts to believe everything they went through was because they were hunting and killing whales for profit. He takes the sperm whale to be an eye-opener.

He looks it in the eye and whilst the world wonders why he doesn’t budge, he silently lets the beast go thus saving his crew from another mishap. All those segments have been beautifully depicted by Ron. It is really hard to show such bits via a movie but he nails it anyhow.

Also the survival tale reeks of an emotional trauma when the crew resorts to cannibalism. It hasn’t been depicted but the words and the diegetic tone are enough to give you an idea. It is a terrible thing to have happened. Howard ensures he keeps things subtle whilst touching such a delicate topic.

Charles Leavitt’s screenplay is downright gorgeous. There isn’t a moment you don’t marvel at his beautiful words. They are drenched in literary awesomeness. There are so many points wherein I felt my ears tingle with powerful words.

I would highly recommend this movie to everyone. It is a beautiful tribute to Herman Melville and his super-rad legendary creation Moby Dick.

Inside Out Review (2015)

Hands down! Animation’s finest!

Inside Out is definitely one of animation’s biggest benchmarks in the history of the animated. So good a movie! It is not just entertainment, it is edutainment. If you pay attention you would be logically thrilled as well. It is like the inception of animation. Only simpler to understand yet intricate at so many levels!

This has to be placed amongst the greats. Not only is this movie extremely hilarious, it is also very dramatic, highly educative, and morally impeccable.

Taking up two big plots simultaneously in the vanguard was a Herculean task per se. But Pete Doctor and Ronaldo Del Carmen merge them just fine to weave an excellent coming-of-age story of Riley whose life decisions are technically controlled by voices in her head. We have Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger and Disgust that literally define the head of our protagonist.

The concept is simply outstanding. Notions that define how we feel have been brought to life by Pixar’s amazing animation and they look downright perfect. Thoughts, memories, imagination, sub-conscious every area of a human brain has been beautifully and subtly portrayed using humorous characters as props. Watch out for the adorable Bing Bong!

The drama is absolutely melting. So warm and so right that it beats every non-animated drama flick to pulp. The Bing Bong fate and the gloom of the memory dump are the most melodramatic bits in the movie that would uproot your heart away.

Michael Giacchino’s music is simply amazing. The composition is quite soothing. He stops playing his notes at dramatic bits for emphasis and then lightens up the mood, after the grim passes. Really thoughtful!

There are valued lessons strewn all across the movie that just feels so right, and have been exploited in the right amounts. Humour is always lurking around in the corner even in the direst of circumstances and you end up laughing every time. Amy Poehler’s voice makes Joy, well you know, joyous. Phyllis Smith’s voice as Sadness is quite endearing. Bill, Diane, Kyle and Richard just make everything better.

Oh and there is an amazing short called Lava that plays in the beginning! Giving you a heads up there! Exceptional stuff!