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King Arthur Legend of the Sword Review (2017) | Choose to Take Away the Music

We were up for a bumpy ride already when we had discovered it was none other Guy Ritchie directing King Arthur Legend of the Sword movie. It would be safe to say that the flick has been Ritchie-fied enough, coz it has that tinge of Guy Ritchie effect that we have always thoroughly enjoyed. However, in delivering King Arthur to us, by passing it through the anvil of his eccentricity, the importance of the legend ends up getting ruffled, shaken up so much that it ends up becoming a gaudy affair.

The problem with King Arthur Legend of the Sword is that it is too fast-paced. So much that you wish there was a pause button for the big screen. Such pace isn’t really healthy if there’s a tale to be told. Legends work out great when there’s proper focus, when you are feeling every modicum of the thrill, and most importantly relating to stuff. Sadly with Ritchie behind the camera, it becomes hard to fill in the shoes of Arthur. You can hardly manage to relate to the actor, and whatever he does.

Despite that, there are so many other factors to consider here, for example, the extraordinary music composed by Daniel Pemberton that elevates the movie altogether. You go home with something at least, if not with that smug smile of satisfaction, then at least contented with that stunning outstanding score by Pemberton.

Direction of King Arthur (Spoilers)

Guy Ritchie thinks different. He isn’t the crowd. That’s one of the most crucial virtues he retains. To experiment every now and then, to come up with better shots, better ways of storytelling, and pulling off unusual stunts are things he just loves to do. I particularly love the way he edits his frames for humour. There is always a story being narrated in his flicks and it’s fun to catch up with what is going on.

But you take in too much of his style, you suddenly begin to see through his pattern. It is his regular mannerism of doing things. Like how a different frame starts, frames before the earlier scene is packed up. He does that too much in King Arthur Legend of the Sword, and it becomes outright absurd at one point.

Even normal collisions end up becoming too much layered up with visual effects. Generally, the boss fights are supposed to uplift the whole flick. But here the ending is more about visual effects than the actual fight. The worst thing is that you have to figure out that the sword could depict the future too. It’s hard to contain yourself from blurting out: “Really?”

still from king arthur legend of the sword movie

Choosing to show clashes with Excalibur in bullet time seemed plain stupid. Even though it is abounding with theatrics there, it doesn’t seem quite right. It almost meant any man with the sword could do it if he was connected to it with blood. Also, it sucks out the joy we expect in a punishing fight. It’s as if The Flash came out of nowhere and ended the war. So not cool!

Jude Law as Vortigern

Probably one of the best things in King Arthur Legend of the Sword is Jude Law. Not only is his acting top-notch, his role as the arrogant King Uncle is befitting as well. With Guy Ritchie providing him with some of the best theatrics ever, his perversion becomes insanely amplified altogether.

His Vortigern is a revolt for Hollywood that has produced cruel kings who are smug, stylish and outrageously wicked. He is the finest one of them all, and you can see that through via the confidence he brings to his act.

Watching him walking down in tears to sacrifice his own blood for power puts you in a strange sense of disposition. At one point he even cuts an ear off of Back Lack and speaks inside it for him to hear. Talk about badassery! Then there is that “walking down to meet the people”, style is written all over him.

You can order King Arthur Legend of the Sword from here:

Charlie Hunnam as Arthur

While this project saw a lot of casting choices, the decision to put Charlie Hunnam in the frontline wasn’t that bad after all. As an actor he is great, and he does enough justice to King Arthur. With a physique of a legendary hero wielding the Excalibur makes things a whole lot legendary.

Unfortunately, in the long line of memorable heroes, he ends up becoming a tad forgettable. And it’s not his fault at all. There wasn’t enough drama in the tale to actually feel for the protagonist. There wasn’t a proper pause so that you could really read his thoughts, and empathize with what he might be going through. I think it is quite bad for an actor to be forgotten when he is playing the lead role.

The Mage

The idea to turn the movie into a surreal magical phenomenon might not have sieved in and played well with the multitude. Well, even though magic is supposed to make things better, somehow the inclusion of the storyline about “mages” aren’t used aplenty. Their justification happens with the sword being magical, and that’s the sole purpose of them being there.

With The Mage played by Astrid Berges-Frisby trying to help Arthur in many ways, her inclusion ends up becoming the most dispensable thing in the flick. It’s almost as if she was only created out of thin air, just so as to stretch the movie for a plot. Whilst there wasn’t a single bit of romance lurking anywhere, her presence is strangely disappointing. We could have used her powers in so many ways, and yet all we did was to pull out a cheap magic trick for a cheap thrill.

Other Characters

A lot of characters are created alongside King Arthur by supporting actors like Djimon Honsou, Aidan Gillen, Kingsley Ben-Adir, Freddie Fox, Tom Wu, Michael McElhatton, Rob Knighton and Neil Maskell. With Aidan Gillen’s character Bill being good with the bow, you might remember him the most from all of the above. And maybe Neil’s Back Lack owing to that short father-son moment with Blue which is strangely poignant. The rest of the cast seem like a dispensable affair that was overlooked big time owing to shoehorning characters.

Eric Bana is in there, making a short stint as the father of King Arthur. He plays Uther and his cameo is as small as that of Igraine (Poppy Delevingne), Maggie (Annabelle Wallis), Elsa (Katie McGrath) and Catia (Millie Brady).

Can we even blame editing enough?

Au contraire, there’s a cameo of David Beckham that’s just hard to miss.

Ravishing Music

One of the best things about the movie is hands down its music. Daniel Pemberton…Ladies and gentlemen! If you never heard that name before time to put him on your top composers list. The chap’s a Golden Globe and BAFTA nominated hero in the backdrop. He will set you up in the right mood with some deafening relentless composition. It’s so brilliantly done for the movie that I have put him on my playlist. He is really that good!

He will set you up in the right mood with some deafening relentless composition. It’s so brilliantly done for the movie that I have put him on my playlist as well. He is really that good!

I loved Growing Up Londinium, The Lady in the Lake and The Born King the most.

You can check out Growing Up Londinium here:

The Final Verdict

A lot of work has been put into making King Arthur Legend of the Sword, you can almost tell that by the quality of visual effects, the mind-boggling music the movie carries, and the beautiful engaged acting performed by the cast. You can sense that frustration if things don’t work out your way, and I can feel thousands of hearts breaking on realizing how the movie fared on its first day. But it’s a price an artist is and should be willing to pay when joining hands with big names.

The movie ends up becoming a farrago of revolution since Guy Ritchie isn’t comfortable to make time jumps. He chooses to fast forward the entire childhood, and King Arthur’s quest leaving out crucial drama often to actually feel, empathize or relate to any of its characters. And whatever happened to that classy humour from The Man from U. N. C. L. E.  or Snatch for that to matter?

The primal problem with the movie is its limited time which forced Guy Ritchie to scooch in things he could have shown properly if it were only a TV series. But didn’t we have Merlin already for that?

I say just take out the music, rejoice in it and remember it like there is a Guy Ritchie version of the legendary tale as well.

Check out the trailer of King Arthur Legend of the Sword here:

Spy Review (2015)

Spy is hilarious!

“I’ve swallowed enough microchips and shit them back out again to make a computer!”

You know what you are in for when you have hilarious lines like that. Spy simply breathes on McCarthy’s excellent comic timing, Peter Serafinowicz’s horniness (boy that doesn’t stop at all), Statham’s goofiness (he can do anything!), Byrne’s snobby demenaour and Jude Law’s pizzazz. Oooh oooh and there is obnoxious gore too!

Spy is a fun ride if you wish to have some good laughs into a clichéd backdrop. You have often played serious things goofy in your heads. When your spoof mode is on and you make fun of everything dramatic. Spy does that! Period.

The plot is well put, but is hard to concentrate on when you put Melissa in the vanguard. She is a fluffy bag of awesomeness that just doesn’t stop tickling you. Complements her superbly is Miranda Hart who is brilliant as her bestie and boy she’s funny!

Like every other comedy, there are unforeseen cuts, unserious frames that lose gravity as soon as things start to become serious. The climax dies out pretty soon too. There is nothing that really thrills you. But the movie’s a hoot! Who’s complaining?

Go watch it!

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review (2014)

“It was an enchanting old ruin.”

The Grand Budapest Hotel is drenched in literary awesomeness, Wes Anderson’s beautiful adventurous tale is about the life of a concierge named Gustave, who develops a friendship with a loyal Lobby Boy Zero Moustafa, a young immigrant from the East, on account of a misfortune that fires an avalanche of events. Set in a span between the World Wars, the story is basically a narration from a writer, who had met a hollow version of Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel, who in turn narrates every account of his and Gustave’s adventure to him. (Talk about Inception eh!)

Screenplay is just marvellous. It touches bits of humour quite subtly. The direction is top notch just the way Wes likes to depict his cinema. If you have seen his previous works you would know how brilliantly he projects his frames and takes you to a different world altogether. You couldn’t help but marvel at the way he rotates his camera and runs into inanimate things for focus. He leaves most of the action part to our vivid imagination. Built backdrops and landscapes in the flick are quite artistic and perfectly manifested with a unique animation.

Wes carves his writing gorgeously, as occasionally he slips into splendid poetic verses beautifully enunciated by Ralph Fiennes. The story runs great along with some exceptional editing. A gripping adventure that breathes on outstanding performances by Fiennes, Norton, Dafoe, Brody, Goldblum and Revolori. Even though it had a stellar cast, actors like Bill Murray, Jude Law, Tom Wilkinson, Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton, Jason Schwartzman basically had cameos.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is simply a glimpse into the creative head of Wes Anderson. It is a remarkable feat in comedy and direction and a must watch for people who love quality cinema.