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The Lobster Movie Review (2015) | A Satire on Human Relationships

The Lobster Movie is a stunning satire. It is a metaphor on relationships, of how humans are always under constant peer pressure of finding that one true soul mate that has the same mental disability or defining characteristic as theirs. It is a society that’s divided into two major factions that calls shots on the relationship game – one being that of a loner, whilst the other cohort belongs to that of the couples. The Lobster movie is an unbiased therapeutic journey of David played brilliantly by Colin Farrell who stays influenced by all the rules, and takes decisions complying to set ordeals.

Direction of The Lobster Movie

What Yorgos Lanthimos does with his mammoth project is absolutely breathtaking. His choice of plot projection is simply ravishing too. He chooses to pick a monotonous mannerism to reflect on life’s bleakness. Our pointless gestures captured in one single dull tone. Every character is written in morose vibes except when they are pretending. Then there were his subtle lighting effects to assist him with his gorgeous setup.

still of Rachel Weisz and Colin Farrell in The Lobster movie

His story chugs forward in decisive emblematic frames. There’s a reason every frame is there, silent metaphors lurking inside them. And he manages to leave you mesmerized with his product. At the end he leaves you guessing too, finally dropping a possibility of a big ‘what-if’ thus throwing you in a whirlwind of thoughts. You come out wondering, questioning, assessing and re-evaluating what the director had in his mind, and how everything sieves in to fit the bill.

Yorgos Lanthimos and Efthymis Filippou come up with this beautiful screenplay that goes hand in hand with life’s countless equations. They trace us in a way, stay comical at times and yet so profound that it is hard to shake their thought off.

We all dance by ourselves, that’s why we only play electronic music.

Theme and Comparisons

The comparisons that Yorgos Lanthimos intends to make and so effortlessly puts out there will compel you to question your life’s choices. Imagine a hotel, a mental institution of sorts, where people come out to meet their right fit. They are allotted a fixed amount of time to set their life in order, by finding a partner – a requisite to stay complete and fulfilled in a world obsessed with relationships.

“She feels nothing at all.”

The Hotel

The hotel forces upon its rules and regulations creating its very own set of theories and beliefs to establish its ordeals forcing people to act on them. People act as sheep following ways laid down by the Hotel. They have their very own idea of eternal bliss sprawled out on their brochures compelling others to think of yachts as their ‘happily everafters’. That finding a companion is the ultimate thing that needs be done. If by chance you couldn’t find a companion by the end of 45 days of hotel stay, you will be deemed unfit and turned into an animal. Animal here is a subtle wink at people who are looked at by our current societal set of mind as goners.

the hotel in the lobster movie

Loners

Au contraire to hotel’s belief, stands resistance. Rebellions known as loners (aptly named) who prefer to stay alone, dance alone in their misery. They are constantly hunted by the hotel residents as a sport. It is a way of Lanthimos implying society constantly picking on singles every now and then, turning them into animals. The juxtaposition of a world right outside that of hotel is beautifully done. You think that maybe the resistance would be the good guys, but no! Though liberal in their outlook they have their own set of regulations that take punitive measures for those who do not abide by their own laws.

“You can be a loner until the day you die. There is no time limit.”

City

City life here is another clever allusion at the world out there, where people judge you based on your relationship status. Staying single is a crime there. It works entirely on the lines of hotel beliefs. To them it is more of a preparation to set you out for sea. All the happy couples live, work and shop there. If you somehow are spotted single, cops start prodding you asking questions to establish if you aren’t an outcast, a loner which is a punishable crime in their eyes.

Then there are missions which are analogous to life’s menial purposes. Whilst the hotel is bent on hunting loners with tranquilizers, the mission of the loners is to bring chaos into the lives of those in relationships. The latter tries to open the eyes of those blinded by the concept of love. All of it is astoundingly directed.

“It is more difficult to pretend that you do have feelings when you don’t than to pretend you don’t have feelings when you do.”

With horrendous choices like the two factions, you can’t understand which one is right? Which one is the perfect one? Which one you should opt for? Because the idea of both of them are equally abysmal.

Beautiful Allegory

There are tons of allegorical slaps strewn all across the movie that makes you ponder on how things work in real life, and how pretentious we consider some things to be.

It also intelligently hints on how we are not supposed to be dependent on others for anything. This clever remark has been wrapped in the following extraordinary quote:

“Don’t expect anyone else to dig your grave for you or to carry your corpse. We’ll throw some dirt over you but that’s about it.”

That we should take matters in our own hand, always be prepared for the worst, and try to find a way without expecting someone to help us out.

Then there are numerous human emotions that come part and parcel of a relationship. Like the apparent jealousy, anxiety and distress that bothers you when you see someone talking, gifting, and caring for your partner more than you. It is perfectly shown when David goes over the top to find out if a person had the same distinctive feature as that of his love interest.

What is worth appreciating is the fact how Lanthimos uses ointments as an exemplary wink at single people in pain. How they can’t reach it by themselves, and are forced to live with it.

“He didn’t know how much it hurts to be alone, how much it hurts when you cannot reach to rub pain-relief ointment on your back, and you are constantly in pain.”

I intend to write a proper explanation of the movie in detail to help you fathom The Lobster movie completely. Keep your eyes open for that post.

You can order The Lobster movie here:

 

The Final Verdict

The Lobster makes for a very satisfying watch owing to its extraordinary comparisons, its dark parables and its unsettling irony. The final climax, leaves you in a cliffhanger posing a question as to what the protagonist might have really done. It leaves you to decide and that’s what a good movie should always do. Make you think for hours!

You can check out the trailer of The Lobster movie here:

 

Spectre Review (2015) | Sam Mendes Embellishes James Bond Yet Again

Spectre is yet another exquisite icing to the renowned double agent’s tale. The grandeur of James Bond returns with Sam Mendes’s enthralling direction.

“To liars and killers. To liars and killers everywhere.”

SAM MENDES AND BOND CONNECTION

It’s official. Sam Mendes is the only person who does immaculate refined justice to Bond. It is so great to see him handle such colossal projects. Three years ago, he had done a similar job of primping and preening the Bond who was jackhammered into the debris of Solace. With the right kind of posture, demeanour and mien, he had in his mind for a Bond of our dreams, Mendes’ protagonist soared to an unimaginable level. So he created Bond, a man with the right words, the right class and the right air.

still of james bond wearing spectre mask

The depth in his eyes when he seeks love, the fearless fluent proclamations he bears on his lips when he faces his enemies, his unique flamboyant flair, and the way he walks adjusting his cuffs. Ooh! So filled with pizzazz! Daniel Craig hits a home run with every minute detail that’s asked of him to master a Bond of style. He will stand tall as one of the best Bonds to have ever walked on the big screen.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

Writers of Spectre do a fair job of revisiting the forgotten by punching in faces from the past to shake up an already stirred Bond. However, it is hard to shake him up. This is Bond we are talking about. Craig looks more focused, fearless and more relentless than ever in Spectre movie.

Spectre is one of the most realistic movies to have ever been made in the Bond saga. Even whilst Bond shoots pawns of Blofeld, he does so by sitting, crouching and aiming before taking the shot. He takes into account the distance factor, which seems quite plausible when you compare it to past Bond movies. He has a story to unfurl which moves at quite an interesting pace. (I don’t know why some found it lengthy!)

still of spectre movie daniel craig and lea seydoux

Christoph Waltz is brilliant as Blofeld too. His villainy is soothing, calm never leaving its walls of perversion. He has a badass voice that he carries superbly throughout his ephemeral act.

We have a side plot led by Andrew Scott which runs parallel to the story. Sam Mendes tries really hard to juggle both stories and endeavours to hold them in the same basket, but barely manages to succeed at that. Somehow I feel, the director could have done a better job weaving it more brilliantly.

BEAUTIFUL SCENES (SPOILERS AHEAD):

There are extremely beautiful bits in the movie that come to my mind when I think of it. Like the one where Bond wakes up to the silencing commotion of a mouse. He points the gun at it and says,

“Who are you working for?”

I think watching Bond sandwiched between M and Swann was brilliantly shot. It was quite poetic if you really look at it. At one side, there were “saving-the-world-shoes” to fill, whilst at the other end there was freedom and the love of his life gawking at him with hopeful eyes. Right at the middle, the author of his pain asked him to shoot him. As Swann had said before life gives you choices. Bond was faced with a choice to kill and not to kill, and of course, to choose a side. To Blofeld’s beseeching command to kill him, he empties his barrel and says,

“I would if I had bullets.”

and starts walking towards Swann. He chooses “to stop.” What a beautiful way to go!

One of the most daring acts of Bond in the flick is when he rams and tries to scooch a plane amidst a narrow path surrounded by trees. He stops at nothing whilst chasing. So he has proven in the beginning chase scene of Casino Royale. Another one of course, walking into the lion’s den eventually, which was both bold and stupid at the same time. But hey, we are talking Bond here!

still of Dave Bautista in Spectre movie by Sam Mendes

The beginning of the flick is outrageously rad too. The cameras that walk alongside Bond as he strolls through Mexican streets, to a hotel room, then scales beside him till he reaches his target, every bit of it has been gorgeously captured. Action is top-notch as well. Watch out for the Bautista train duel. Perfetto!

Grab a Blu-Ray DVD of Spectre here:

SCORE OF THE JAMES BOND MOVIE

Another thing that you would notice is its score. So bloody brilliant! Thomas Newman makes the music so beautiful and badass that it’s hard not to notice it. Before deciding to watch Spectre, mark this on your checklist: Choose a theatre you love for its sound. Right from the Mexican beats, to Sam Smith’s marvelous song, to soothing violins, everything downright impeccable!

Sam Mendes frames exceptional panorama as he ranges down beautiful landscapes all across the globe. The photography and the cinematography can’t be overlooked here. Simply outstanding!

This movie is a perfect Craig-Bond tribute. Go bid your adieus! (Only if this is Daniel Craig’s last movie)

You can check out the trailer of Spectre movie here: