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The Brothers Grimsby Review (2016) | Passable Comedy One Time Watch

The Brothers Grimsby has laughable moments, no doubt, that you might end up discussing for being either too inappropriate or for the brazen fun of it, but that’s about it. The movie carries a banal plot to support its comedy on, and things kind of fall as it fails to retain anything tangible to put its feet on. It’s like they say:

“Leave your brains home and go watch this and you might actually enjoy it.”


Sacha Baron Cohen never fails to tickle you by bringing in forefront his natural knack for humour. To throw you into pits of laughter he also carries disgusting items in his baggage as elements of last resort. We are already aware of that. The Brothers Grimsby stays no stranger to his clumsy acts; herein he creates Nobby  yet another Sacha’s infamous character who will test your mirth-patience and have a go at your ribs. Creating a rib-tickling persona that is outright hard to predict.

He uses stark bawdy stuff, which he is known for, one by one to pack in hilarity that will throw you at times into stomach-churning laughter, and yet what’s seen can’t be unseen. Ye been warned!

But you were already in for it when you had decided to watch a Sacha Baron Cohen comedy movie. So, it shouldn’t surprise you at all if you were to see something off-putting cheesy dangling in front of you. Bottom-line: “You get what you ask for.”

That Elephant scene is hands down, one of the funniest bits from the movie. Beware! It might affect you on a psychological level. 😛

still of that elephant scene in the brothers grimsby


The Brothers Grimsby tries to cash in on its unusual story that tries to reveal its crux towards the end, but by the time we reach there, nobody cares about the story anymore. It becomes a hotch-potch of passable frames. At one point, the movie tries to amble on that famous first person fighting perspective made famous by Hardcore Henry,  which works for it a while as far as action sequences were concerned. But given the theme of the movie, it ends up becoming quite unnecessary.

It is good that The Brothers Grimsby not for a second leaves its brotherly love theme that it was based upon. It hasn’t been milked enough and yes there’s a constant disconnect that doesn’t hold the story tighter, but you can still manage to concentrate at the humorous bits that tacked along.


Both the editing and direction of the movie are equally shoddy. Frames tear up at weird junctures. You can’t take anything seriously not even the somberness that Louis Leterrier tries to put occasionally. It is like even at the end of it, you really don’t care if things steered or not towards a happy ending. Because everything is surreal, obnoxious and scattered in bits.

On the brighter side, The Brothers Grimsby is only good if you want something really light to gorge upon and wish to concentrate on your popcorn more. That’s it. Laugh it off!

Check out the trailer of The Brothers Grimsby here:

Kingsman: The Secret Service Review (2014)

Kingsman is exhilarating!

What does a spy movie need? Eye-popping gore, ridiculous concepts, shreds of humour and some ballsy action sequences. Add a suit to it, and you have got yourself some classic JB stuff. But it ain’t James Bond. Kinda more like Jack Bauer! 😉

Matthew Vaughn hardly disappoints. He is a man of KickAss taste (see what I did there?)  He literally survives on theatrics. Take any of Vaughn’s work and you know he has this unique way of film-making that sways around with the actors, occasionally jumps at them for emphasis, and stays till the animation hangs around. Also, if Vaughn gets serious behind the camera, you just know how his work becomes grim all of a sudden. First Class reference intended! Fortunately we see everything in this movie.

You have a concept, even though how clichéd it might sound, that breathes on Vaughn’s pizzazz, which is seriously taken up with Firth’s splendor and well supported by Taron Egerton’s audacity. To fill in the voids you have Mark Strong to the rescue, whose facial expressions are enough to tell shit’s getting serious. Samuel steps up to fill in the boots of villainy with a lisp. He isn’t dangerous exactly but yes he wears a brainiac-head with an idea so hideous that takes care of the world’s population per se.

There are some ridiculous and uncanny bits in the movie but they are all passable because of this explosive entertainment package that we are shot in the head with. Also, primarily because it is a comic adaptation so I would suggest just go with it. Sit back and enjoy the theatrics. Get on a joy ride that would take you to the rails of awesomeness with bursting heads, popping eyes, plucked hands, flying prosthetics, split bodies and a cute little pug. Whoa! Quite a descent!

The finest part of the flick: Watch out for that church massacre! Amen to that! 😉

The Imitation Game Review (2014)

The Imitation Game is a beautiful glimpse into the head of a prodigy.

 “Are you paying attention? Good. If you are not listening carefully, you will miss things. Important things. I will not pause, I will not repeat myself, and you will not interrupt me. You think that because you’re sitting where you are, and I am sitting where I am, that you are in control of what is about to happen. You’re mistaken. I am in control, because I know things that you do not know.”

The flick takes birth with the aforementioned enthralling screenplay that smells of confidence dripping off Cumberbatch’s brainiac-avatar. We like to listen to him that way. His bold voice that reeks of Smaug fury. That voice of Khan that reminds us of his sharp demeanor that he beautifully donned and carried throughout Star Trek. He literally breathes on screenplay. Don’t you just wish screenwriters had more badass words to feed him?

Enigma is impossible to crack. So the world told him. Alan Turing, the prodigy who defied a relentless encrypting machine, was the person responsible for reducing the devastating span of war that engulfed Europe by two years. The Father of Artificial Intelligence played God to minimize casualties and nobody knew. The biopic is a tribute to Turing which eases through 114 minutes of brilliance manifesting his love life, his genius, his eureka and his sorry demise.

Cumberbatch as the polymath works extremely hard to project a guy who is different from the rest by imparting him an apt stammer and a clumsy gravity. Alexandre Desplat weaves magic in the background with his brilliant notes. Morten Tyldum’s direction is good but there are times when you feel it could have gone better. Since, directors believe viewers to be laymen, most of them don’t venture into the technical. What I personally believe is that a little bit fathomable technical is a welcome inclusion and if a director makes you understand the what and the how of the work entailed, big things like cracking a code should give you an equal and exact amount of thrill as projected by the protagonist. Precisely what the flick missed.

Turing is a war hero often unsung and overlooked. What he gave the world is truly precious. Somehow something tells me, this guy’s life deserves a series to portray minute crucial details that couldn’t be possibly condensed in a movie. The grandeur of what he was doing and what he did is beyond time. A flick doesn’t do justice to his remarkable life.

The Imitation Game rivets you with Alan’s ingenious almost instantly. Desplat’s notes make sure that you don’t get a jaded moment at all. Whilst Cumberbatch ensures you witness a prodigy. Goode, Knightley, Dance and Strong fill the screen aptly with their effective and memorable presence. Overall the movie turns out brilliant.

A great biopic to watch! Highly recommended.