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Spotlight Review (2015)

An eye-opener! Spotlight throws spotlight on the ugly side of faith. An issue lodged so profusely in the streams of religion that it goes either unnoticed or remains unlit. Plot: A team of reporters work conscientiously to bring child abuse by priests into the forefront by illuminating the dark hollows of the ugly tactics of the church.

The movie addresses the issue slyly and then dives into it fully fledged owing to the inclusion of a new concerned editor Marty Baron, played superbly by Liev Schreiber whose words make a difference and reignite the died out flame of Walter Robby Robinson (Michael Keaton) who along with his meticulous and diligent team rush in to address the elephant in the room. Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams) and Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James) are both outstanding. They look forever engaged in their pursuit, whilst Mark Ruffalo as Mike Rezendes can’t be ignored. Mark gets into the skin of Mike and creates a new persona altogether, an earnest committed fella who would stop at nothing to nail the molesters. It is almost as he disappears into that stream of acting. Watch him lose it like a maniac!

There are other brilliant characters in the movie that can’t be left uncredited owing to their enthralling acting. Like that of John Slattery as Ben Bradlee, Jr. who fits into the bossy shoes pretty great. Also, Billy Crudup, Stanley Tucci and Jamey Sheridan who were all mesmerizing in their little fleeting acts.

Screenplay of the movie is well written. Becomes very thoughtful at times. The work the people do in the flick will make you feel worthless. So, crucial bringing issues in the dark to the front page! They deserve an ovation.

“That’s why I never got married. I am too busy. What I do is too important.”

The aforementioned is said by Mitchell Garabedian played brilliantly by Stanley Tucci. You could almost read how concerned and thoughtful the guy is from his looks.

Spotlight comes up with a beautiful plot of mind-boggling revelations that will make you hate the religious conventions that hide the truth. It is a dead on collision between the media and the system, which remarkably addresses the church functioning snags. To say that the issue just circles around church would be an understatement. It is a global phenomena, something so ugly that it hardly makes news. This flick beats the odds to come up a victor. Kudos to the thoughtful media on this one!


Spotlight begins with a hushed conversation and a free priest getting away with a horrendous crime. The prologue is reflective of how untouched and unscathed they feel under the aegis of their religious fallacy. How unfazed they feel around the law! Believing they are closer to God they could get away with anything! The perpetrator walks on to his car, escorted by a bigger authority from the Church as the helpless law (a policeman) watches their car drive through a mist of smoke into the oblivion.

It delves deep into some outstanding reporting too which is well captured by Tom McCarthy that shows us how extraordinary the efforts of Boston Globe reporters really were in bringing out the issue at hand into the limelight. The final result will gratify you and if you are the empathizing kind, you will feel the cold yet comforting gaze of justice from the end credits.

The world’s full of sexual predators. They could be masked as priests too. To look the other way is not the solution. If it is happening in your corridors, speak up. Crime’s after all a crime. Something needs to be done or the world will go blind.

Talvar Review (2015)

Enthralling and exhilarating joyride!

India’s biggest unsolved case couldn’t get a truer justice. Talvar is simply mind-boggling. From the engaging frames of Meghna Gulzar comes a tale without a tail. An investigation that will leave you at your wit’s end. With Vishal Bhardwaj’s magnificent writing comes a piece that will let you fathom the ‘what’ and leave the ‘how’ for you to figure.

You can’t really forget the Aarushi murder case ever. Primarily because of all the media uproar it had managed to garner. It was always the talk of the town and always playing on the TV. The media were in the search of their masala (spice) and boy did they get their masala. It turned out to be a case where the conclusion was dropped first and assumed true way before the actual investigation. A perfect resonance to a typical Indian societal head! It is brilliantly reflective of the shortcomings of the Indian Police as they failed to take things seriously. It is one helluva slap to the smug face of the Indian Constitution, and would always be remembered as a black patch in the historical leaflets of crime-solving.

Irrfan Khan brings a unique vibrancy to the flick that is downright commendable. His innate acting skills prevail in the air, and bring with him the right attitude. Right from the moment the movie begins it has a natural flavor to it, something Gulzar has managed to capture perfectly. All the characters in the flick are very well portrayed and brilliantly enacted. It has a side story too to make things interesting with the protagonist, to take your head off the steam occasionally.

Names have been changed for emphasis which is quite understandable looking at the gravity of the case and the propensity for things getting blown out of context.

It leaves you with trillion questions, and a billion what ifs. If at the end of the movie you don’t come up with a conclusion in your head, and don’t find yourself gnawing hard pressing on the detective brain of yours, the job of the filmmakers would be incomplete.

That is the beauty of the movie. It leaves you baffled, wanting for more, and a proper closure. But Alas! That’s how life is. Unsolved.