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Tag: melodrama

Carol Review (2015)

An alluring take on same-sex love!

Carol isn’t just a self-exploration sojourn of Therese Belivet; it is so much more. With an enchanting screenplay to keep us company, Carol walks with a constant finesse depicting human emotions in a beautiful way. You can’t help but feel for the characters as they carry the right gusto in their acts.

Rooney Mara is simply outstanding. She carries a face of innocence that reads confusion quite often, whilst trying to learn the ways of her character. Coming to her aid is the voluptuous Carol Aird played by Cate Blanchett, whose life is torn apart owing to an ongoing divorce scene that hurls her into fits of melancholia.

SPOILERS:

The way Todd Haynes traverses the camera from a gutter to a third person perspective by capturing the rattling and chugging of a train in the backdrop, to reach the protagonists having a conversation on a table speaks volume of his sheer genius. Right there the prologue gets painted, and memories gush in from the past through the mist of the car window, as Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) gawks at the city, being indifferent to the talks of the mundane.

It is a beautiful way of depicting movie frames which Haynes seems to have mastered. He nails them like a pro. Complements Todd brilliantly in the background with an enthralling profound score is Carter Burwell, whose music is placed at right scenes, to make you feel the flick’s endearing rhythm.

“My angel, flung out of space.”

Love has so many forms. It goes beyond age and sex, and Patricia Highsmith’s story couldn’t cover it better. With a genius like Todd to help us crawl alongside the frames, the movie forever stays in empathetic waters. With spectacular performances by Cate and Rooney, the movie reaches a pinnacle of emotions. Little things, like when Therese notices minute details in Carol whilst she drives, and when she shows up eventually with a quivering heart hoping that she would see her are all brilliantly shot.

The movie’s drama at times misses on milking Carol’s love for Therese. Her life’s atrocities fail to cash in on the love she feels for Therese, and that’s where the flick appears to have dwindled. But still Haynes manages to keep the juices flowing and what we have in the end is a magnificent project in melodrama.

Highly recommended!

The Danish Girl Review (2015)

A powerful movie! Eddie delivers an enthralling performance.

The Danish Girl is a self-realization sojourn of Einar Wegener, a top-notch landscape painter from Denmark, who unfurls gradually into his true identity. Never leaving his side in a full supportive backdrop is Gerda Wegener, played superbly by Alicia Vikander, who depicts a gorgeous shade of loyal love.

The movie leaves you wondering how bold and resolute Einar Wegner really was, to have pioneered the transgender transformation. In an era of hush-hush, where people looked at you differently, Einar managed to do something extraordinary and unorthodox that is worth an ovation. He wasn’t really bothered about what people might say or do. He just cared about finding what he was, in an unwavering fashion.

SPOILERS:

The story leaves you in tears owing to the “Gerda-persistence”. Not for a second does she stop loving her husband, and accepts Einar’s true identity and helps him to achieve his transformation. She wavers once, but that was it. Where will you find such altruistic love?

The performance of Eddie Redmayne is mind numbing as Lili. He wears all the womanly expressions to perfection, with the slight but right blush, blinking of his eyes and that crimsoned smile, he just nails every bit like a pro. So reassuring is his performance that he gets lost into it completely. Really convincing! The music and screenplay are simply outstanding. Well played and intelligently written. Acting A1! Plot superbly woven.

Some bits in the movie unknowingly walk into the clichéd territory, for instance when two French guys beat the crap out of Einar, also the fact that Gerda is crushed ‘neath her loyalty towards her husband and requited love, seem more like a revisited enclave.

As The Danish Girl rambles to fruition, the movie begins losing its dramatic quotient and charm that had so brilliantly managed to keep us riveted. Editing goes a little bit dodgy there, and it loses its rhythm. The quiet is overshadowed by the shaky focus as frames change one after the other beating melodrama to pulp. Although right at the climax it peaks once again and makes up for all of it. But, still you are compelled to feel something wasn’t quite right during the last bits.

However, overall the movie did justice to the transgender pioneer and the girl who never left his side, Gerda the true hero. A splendid flick!

The Hateful Eight Review (2015)

The Hateful Eight is a thrilling crime carnage that crawls and feeds on utter suspense.

Quentin has a knack for making the awesome. Not only does he walk in with a dope gore crime drama in his baggage, but he directs the tale magnificently too.

Plot, strewn across three hours of engaging drama, entails six chapters akin to a book that have been well played by a stellar cast. With the front runner Quentin’s ace Samuel L. Jackson under the skin of Major Marquis Warren, and Kurt Russell as John Ruth, a.k.a The Hangman, to do us the honours in the form of bounty hunters, with the latter carrying a brutal plot alongside in cuffs, everyone is headed towards a chaotic world waiting at Minnie’s haberdashery. What is quite beautiful is the way the story unfolds. You almost feel like nothing’s wrong and yet everything is!

The theme is loosely based on blood law, where shooting a perpetrator is simply a form of justice nail and jackhammering it down is a perfect way to end it. But you need to understand if it’s a bandit landscape, killing or shooting without a conscience, without batting an eye, is an acceptable way of living.

Jennifer Jason Leigh is simply outstanding as Daisy Domergue. Tatum has basically a cameo of a role. Walton Goggins is exceptional. Demian Bichir’s short stint as Bob can’t be overlooked either. Both Madsen and Roth have done their bits nicely.

Ennio Morricone’s theme is addictive as he weaves a thrilling score to complement the tale. Sometimes fed in by awesome songs like Apple Blossom, Now you’re All Alone and There Won’t Be Many Coming Home, cut off superbly by Quentin frames, the end product turns out to be sheer delight.

Tarantino’s head is a cruel world. Bullets and gore are his favorite props. But it’s never confined to that. He always has a unique story to tell, which makes for a great movie watching experience. You can almost sway to the Tarantino rhythm as he prolongs frames for emphasis. But sometimes you do wish some editing to take over and snip off some unwanted bits quickly and be over with. What the movie misses on is gut-wrenching tension that used to be the crux of Quentin’s earlier works.

Another downside of The Hateful Eight is at times you feel everything enacted. There is a fluency missing in the flick that fails to connect every act. With a screenplay that appears being ‘read’ and crispy lines that fail to mingle with others, for a touch of the innate, it seems more of a theatrical put-on act. It is only by the time you reach Chapter Four that you begin enjoying the flick truly, for it is then when sham paves way for clarity and things become more dramatic.

However, leave out the above minute details and The Hateful Eight is still a gorgeous criminal entertainer that speaks only of brilliance. Go watch! Tarantinites shouldn’t miss it for the world!