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Now You See Me 2 Review (2016) | More Info on Lionel Shrike

A bit more glimpse into the life of Lionel Shrike. Now You See Me 2 is more or less capering around the surface of its prequel. So, that leaves its wounds open – the way things were in the previous installment. But it manages to work around it with its stunning theatrics, an elusive plot and a pinch of some rad magic to keep us riveted to our seats.

The thing that is worth noticing, and probably on which the entire story of Now You See Me franchise is based upon is none other than Lionel Shrike. Ring a bell? No? Well, we have got you covered.


Lionel Shrike is like the Houdini of the franchise. So, you have got to place him at the top alongside Thadeus Braddley. The level of magic Lionel Shrike creates is gargantuan. To explain events shown in the movie, I will try to create a timeline of events so you know what happens when.

  • When Lionel Shrike was a kid he asks a man to sign a card as part of a trick. He then hides the card inside the hollow of a tree, letting the tree to grow around it. After 30 years, he asks the same man to sign another card, and then as part of his revelation cuts down the tree to reveal the card from 30 years ago. You can imagine how far he is willing to go for a magic trick.
  • Thaddeus Bradley and Lionel Shrike were actually friends, but nobody knows that since they acted like rivals.
  • Lionel Shrike attempts to do a lock safe stunt in the East River where the stunt goes wrong and he possibly drowns (he might be alive).
  • Before going in he offers his watch to his son (You are wondering who is son is? Brace yourself MAJOR SPOILER: Dylan Rhodes) The poor quality of the safe he was in warps its metal when it reaches the bottom, and the body is never recovered.
  • As the body and the safe wasn’t recovered Tressler Insurance denies paying insurance claim to Dylan’s mother.

That’s how it all began. Dylan swears vengeance to take revenge on both Thaddeus and Tressler and that forms the basis of the story we have been watching so far.

still of lionel shrike played by richard laing in now you see me 2


Daniel Radcliffe as Walter Mabry is absolutely thrilling, although he doesn’t get much to gnaw at. He still manages to make his character interesting. Makes a swell entry! Lizzy Caplan is an awesome find as Lula, a pleasant inclusion to the already stellar cast. Her jocular remarks will make you fall in love with her instantly. Also, she doesn’t make you miss Isla Fisher.

still of Lizzy Caplan as Lula in Now you see me 2 movie lionel shrike

The director’s shaky camera techniques don’t really work here, as he decimates action. If it were not for the plot and some cool magic tricks, it would have failed, nay, fell flat on its face in the muck of its own doing.


Now You See Me 2 has side-plots, some fine to live with but some really vapid and in need of better framing. Two of the worst ones were the twin tale and the original girdle that bound the movie taut. Even though Woody Harrelson creates a charming façade as his twin, the side story doesn’t pack in a big punch. The Morgan Freeman story does, but it simply vexes you forcing you to chase the ‘tale’. It is as if Jon M. Chu serves you a revelation hotchpotch, and boom! they keep falling one after the other on you. It seems rather deliberate and pushed to match the lines of the first installment.

still of daniel radcliffe as Walter Mabry in Now You See Me 2 movie lionel shrike

At times the dialogues of Now You See Me 2 run into cheesy territory and you feel like laughing at serious moments, like when they team up (which by the way they have always acted as), and they go, “Who’s in?” and then others follow, “I am in”, “Me too”.

The side story of Dylan Rhodes, which Mark Ruffalo goes in full-blown acting mode along with Thaddeus Bradley, is a good one but the vendetta never takes place. The final revelation of Now You See Me 2 feels kind of empty even though it was colossal. Maybe it was in dire need of a proper depiction with a revelation theme or something. The way the movie begins, ends the same way opening you to the puns hidden in words which was well thought of. The voice of Morgan does justice to it as well. The Eye still stays as the rudimentary backdrop of the tale, and looks like we have something to look forward to in the long run.

The DVD of Now You See Me 2 movie is available here on Amazon. Order it today:


The card trick to steal the stick is stark badass but unfortunately there is too much of it, and it makes you start thinking out loud. There is comparatively lesser magic and more of hypnotism in Now You See Me 2 which kind of defeats the purpose of magic. The best magical majestic bit is the one Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg) performs with rain as he tries to play God. Absolutely stunning to watch!

You can check out the trailer of Now You See Me 2 here:

London Has Fallen Review (2016)



London has fallen, and does anybody seem to care? How would they? Streets are running empty! You wonder out loud, “Where is everybody?” Oh, Wait! This could be a different dimension altogether! But is it a sci-fi movie? No! So that gets ruled out too! The movie is so bad that it will make you remember the already forgotten previous installment, and make you go, “I think I liked it more when Olympus fell!”

In a world, where cities keep falling and directors try to cash in their checks through big names like Butler, Freeman and Eckhart, by showing meagre action without a good plot or direction to keep the pieces together, you are compelled to wonder what the action-world is degrading into.

In a planet which already reeks of terror, Babak Najafi believes you haven’t had enough, and tries to feed you a mouthful of terror-jargon with ample gun shots, bombs and some third-grade CGI. There is no subtlety in his direction, and you almost see everything coming. What is worse is the way he decides to snap off a frame, and then spearhead into another one, without a proper closure. In his head, he thinks he is being cool, but really Babak, Not Cool! Not Cool!

What was cheesy was the fact that every character in the movie gets a label. Najafi thought we were really that interested to notice who’s who. There is one juncture where all presidents get exterminated within seconds, which was laughable rather than being poignant. So, if your country’s president was insinuated there, you would go “Damn!” and might walk off the theater.

The screenplay has nothing to offer. It is further exacerbated to pulp just as victims of Gerard-fury were by the flick’s shoddy direction. Radha Mitchell just makes matters worse by running with a baby in her belly like she is on a football field. Gerard Butler stares at his screen with a scrappy resignation letter without emphasizing enough focusing on the words honor and privileged (wow! Writers!) just to tell you that he is thinking about it. Subtle, eh! Aaron goes live and suddenly he decides to be a man and show some real ballsy presidency. In his head he must be like, “Look at me, I am your ideal tough!” Shivani Ghai shouts at Patrick Kennedy to stay on the ground and then shoots him ensuring her order is heard. Well played! Oooh-Oooh before I forget, there was this guy who seemed constantly worried; he had a weird eyebrow that pointed up, no matter what. So even if he was happy he looked worried.

Sometimes these action flicks make me wonder if adroit Presidents watch them too and say, “Hey! That’s me. I am holding a gun, and going Bam! Bam! And Kaboom!” At least Family Guy’s Mayor Adam West would say that.

If we look at the bright side, which we generally do, the final action bits are pretty dope, when Gerard goes full Rambo on the terrorists. It almost seems like a good game you are playing, that skims the surface of Splinter Cell or Hitman for that to matter. The camera goes with a continuous shot, and Babak seems to have been waiting the whole movie just to shoot that. It was good while it lasted. Then the clouds of pointlessness walk in again.

Lucy Review (2014)

“I don’t feel pain, fear, desire. It’s like all things that make us human are fading away.”

Lucy is shimmering with a beautiful concept. Scarlett has literally touched the other side. All the projects she has taken over the years have inadvertently pushed her above the average 10% human capability, so she proves with her intense fervour as human before the interval and then later as the insentient being wrapped in a superhuman commotion!

Lucy is everything you want to see Scarlett do. Primarily act and then may be shoot some hooligans. The sci-fi flick is an avant garde endeavour to explore our origins in a clever fashion: Through the head of a Brainiac!

Morgan Freeman is brilliant as the professor who expounds the rudimentary in his soothing voice. His theory in resonance with Lucy’s story, whilst Min-sik Choi does what he does best – devilry!


Luc carves Scarlett brilliantly, develops her character gradually bringing out her supernatural capabilities one by one with flash cards showing %ages to keep the clueless engaged. What makes Besson an absolute delight is his subtle inclusion of animal imagery to contrast similarities. The wonderful work on pictorial similes is indicative of his brilliant avant garde style of direction!

The movie has a message that stares hard at our soul and laments cruelly on how less we feel, how caught up we are in little things and how easily we overlook vast! It also throws light on the time theory and the meaningless scaling of the incomprehensible!

The finest bit in the movie is when Scarlett flips time to understand stages of Evolution. Time reverses in quick succession and we get a glimpse of our origins. The rad one is when she helms toward invincibility!

What brings the emotional quotient to the movie was the part where Scarlett calls her mother to express how she feels: “I want to thank you for a thousand kisses that I can feel on my face.”

The score is brilliant. Beats are apt. Screenplay is catchy and memorable. Apart from few passable flaws, the movie kicks ass and makes you brood. Good enough reasons for me to like a movie!

Interstellar Review (2014)

Not long ago, I watched a featurette with excerpts from the movie Interstellar, which showed the gargantuan amount of work and sweat Nolan brethren, Kip Thorne and others put in whilst exploring the behaviour of a black hole. The crisp attention and the minute details they did not overlook flabbergasted me beyond limit. So hopeful was written all over my head. And Nolan never disappoints.


Strewn with science, this movie not only takes you on a joy ride, it educates you as well. The concept of space-time singularity pervades throughout the flick as we witness a superb simulation of a black hole, and it doesn’t stop at just that. We go into it. Yes, through the eyes of our protagonist for the first time, we witness a distinct theoretical world that has found pragmatism. An impeccable representation of Tesseract with threads of time.

The best thing about Nolan is the enormity of the project he takes. The script is so beautifully written that it rivets you right from the start. The concept is like magic, a miracle happening in a distant galaxy. As the story unfolds it makes you feel as if you are getting closer to finding answers to our existence finally. The plot however has something else in store for you. And it is a big fat blunt satire on our loneliness. We are alone and all we have is each other. That is the penultimate truth.

Wormhole was never explored like this before. How time plays tricks on you, powerful representation of anomalies, the wickedness of human mind when left alone in despair(that Damon bit), how the music of nature (the rain, the thunder and the cricket chirping noise) makes you feel home, the conundrum of our purpose, the humour of TARS, the physics that touches almost every part in the flick, the poetry of the brave and wise through Dylan Thomas’s words, superb lamenting conversations, and the brain-wrecking revelations in the end – every little detail has been exemplified with proper logical explanations and shown on a platter of sensations.

Emotional surge is strong, and with a power pack performance by McConnaughey everything uplifts. Bits of a father-daughter melodrama are the most feeling kind. Shatters you from the inside, as you empathize with the protagonist’s tears. Zimmer touches your heart with his profound score. Notes are so brilliant that they put you right into the flick. This too would sit amongst Zimmer’s best works.

It is one of the most ambitious projects that would be remembered in impending debates for the intricacies it touches and the science it explores. Nolan is certainly one of a kind director, a great gift to mankind, a wise man who wouldn’t go gentle into that good night. Kudos to yet another mammoth achievement!