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Cars 3 Movie Review (2017) | A Story of Selflessness and Sacrifice

Cars 3 movie is a serious improvement over the prequel we saw six years ago. It has a better story to tell. There are even selfless life lessons to learn from here and even though Cars 3 movie is a tad slow for some people’s taste, it races past all the waving flags to count as a good entertainer nevertheless.

The main theme of Cars 3 movie this time isn’t about chasing your own dreams, rather taking a back seat to identify other’s. Its selfless culminating point holds as the nub of the story it intends to bring the protagonist up to speed with. It is more about making a colossal sacrifice by being altruistic and focusing on those who are in need of their shot at life.

While I choose to take away the good from the flick, the movie isn’t all impeccable either. The fact that it chooses to be nostalgic for most of the part about a crucial character’s demise, it ends up becoming a dispensable drag. Even the humour part sees a major setback. With literally few races to hold the story up taut, it becomes more of a setup to reach its unpredictable end. Anyhow, there are gorgeous lessons inscribed in it that makes the flick a thoughtful creation.

Lessons to Take from Cars 3 Movie (Spoilers)

The screenplay of Cars 3 movie has been beautifully written. There are some great bits that will straighten up your ears. There is so much to take from the movie that it makes you once again hopeful for life.

You can’t turn back the clock, kid. But you can wind it up again.

The time when Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo) breaks it to Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) about her dream to become a racer was one of the best parts of the flick. She tells him that it was her nervousness and self-dubitation on finding herself huddled up against the likes of great racers, that took her away from her dream. When she asks McQueen how did he handle it, McQueen replies:

I never thought I couldn’t.

There wasn’t even a morsel of self-doubt in McQueen, and that’s why he never failed in life. He used to be nothing but an embodiment of confidence, and his decisive nature and undoubting acts helped him to win countless races.

still from cars 3 movie

The Fuel of Confidence

If you think about it, that’s how life works too. The absence of self-doubt and fidgeting will get you there where you wish to be. If there is even a hint of trepidation in your thoughts, you will end up not doing good at whatever you are pursuing. Be confident, sure of what you are doing and you will succeed every time!

Don’t ever think about whether you could make it, just know that you were made for it. You are a paragon of power, that’s how you were made! You will never fail if you don’t doubt yourself.

I decide when I am done.

But then McQueen experiences failure and self-doubt in the form of a patronizing Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer) who shows him the ugly side of life. McQueen realizes that he isn’t good enough on the tracks and that no matter how hard he tried his speed was never up to the mark. We find him being surrounded by a cloud of uncertainty. And that continuously stays with him even when he was training alongside Cruz.

You can order Cars 3 from here:

The Selflessness

Then there was that big unselfish act in the end that makes you revere McQueen even more. On realizing Cruz’s true potential he gives her a chance to show her mettle and chooses to become what Doc was for him – a mentor. She proves herself by coming first in her first race, and that’s when you realize that every movie about your hero or legend retiring is about them seeing something in someone else, and letting them bear the torch.

Up until Cars 2, the franchise had always been about Lightning McQueen faltering and then rising up again to come over his fears to become the best all over again. It used to be all about McQueen and we just loved to see him bite on the attention too like all those heroes we look up to. But with Cars 3 movie that monotony was broken. It was a pleasant end something you really do not see coming. But McQueen gives you all the more reason to love him as he makes such an enormous sacrifice by letting Cruz have her chance at her dream.

It is so hard to do that because you constantly feel yourself to be the protagonist of your own life. When that bubble bursts for you and you see someone really worthy not getting his/her chance, it’s then you realize that everyone’s life is equally important. That feeling of placing yourself second to make sure justice is served is the best feeling you could get. Cars 3 teaches us to be altruistic and forever be on the lookout for people in need. Help them get what they want if you have been blessed with enough fortune. Everyone deserves a fair shot at life!

still of lightning mcqueen and jackson storm in cars 3

The Final Verdict

Cars 3 is like a phase that every human must go through once in their life. Just like we saw Old Man Logan resting his claws this year, it seems quite fair that every legacy must come to an end. Your prime always finds a calm at one point, and no matter how disheartening it might sound to you, with technology and the posterity taking over, it is one ugly truth that every person must come to terms with.

With the movie trundling down to McQueen’s retirement, (we aren’t really sure as the end alludes that McQueen is going to keep on racing), somewhere deep down we know this that this franchise must rest its bumpers. I think it has been making a fair point all this time with McQueen’s retirement plans to retire a legend. We have milked this franchise enough and it is time for Pixar to start focusing on other projects.

You can check out the trailer of Cars 3 here:

No Escape Review (2015)

No Escape rushes in with a story that would scare any expat venturing into unknown borders. But has it been executed properly? The answer to that is a big No.

John Erick Dowdle’s movie covers a situation. It endeavours to answer the ‘What if’ when you move to an alien land where the entire mob is against you. More like a zombie apocalypse but with people.

The movie is very predictable. You see almost everything coming. There is no subtlety in Dowdle’s frames. The rabid crowd executes headshots from miles away. The attackers have been portrayed as ruthless fanatics without a heart. They kill everyone not just the foreigners. So more like zombies. A little hard to believe there.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

Screenplay is also very poorly written. Pierce Brosnan has just a cameo and he barges in like an assist. His role ends in a jiffy.

Lucy and Beeze are adorable, and they try to beam up things. But all of that happens in the beginning, when chaos hadn’t started. Soon they get out shadowed, except for the occasional “I want to go potty” and “I am hungry” distractions. A lot of things in the movie are not highlighted properly. There is no proper aftermath to an emotional trauma. What is sad to see, Owen Wilson not afraid to put his family into harm’s away. He keeps them on the edge, and someone in the family is always willing to help him by doing something stupid.

Not that great.

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review (2014)

“It was an enchanting old ruin.”

The Grand Budapest Hotel is drenched in literary awesomeness, Wes Anderson’s beautiful adventurous tale is about the life of a concierge named Gustave, who develops a friendship with a loyal Lobby Boy Zero Moustafa, a young immigrant from the East, on account of a misfortune that fires an avalanche of events. Set in a span between the World Wars, the story is basically a narration from a writer, who had met a hollow version of Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel, who in turn narrates every account of his and Gustave’s adventure to him. (Talk about Inception eh!)

Screenplay is just marvellous. It touches bits of humour quite subtly. The direction is top notch just the way Wes likes to depict his cinema. If you have seen his previous works you would know how brilliantly he projects his frames and takes you to a different world altogether. You couldn’t help but marvel at the way he rotates his camera and runs into inanimate things for focus. He leaves most of the action part to our vivid imagination. Built backdrops and landscapes in the flick are quite artistic and perfectly manifested with a unique animation.

Wes carves his writing gorgeously, as occasionally he slips into splendid poetic verses beautifully enunciated by Ralph Fiennes. The story runs great along with some exceptional editing. A gripping adventure that breathes on outstanding performances by Fiennes, Norton, Dafoe, Brody, Goldblum and Revolori. Even though it had a stellar cast, actors like Bill Murray, Jude Law, Tom Wilkinson, Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton, Jason Schwartzman basically had cameos.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is simply a glimpse into the creative head of Wes Anderson. It is a remarkable feat in comedy and direction and a must watch for people who love quality cinema.