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Storks Movie Review (2016) | Adorable Is Written All Over It

Storks movie is high on slapstick humour, chucklesome one-liners and an intelligently thought of oscillating story line. Even though Storks is like a constant roadrunner of a movie, which raises question about its editing, it still manages to rake you in with its primal theme – Baby! Isn’t that a winning idea per se?

THE CONCEPT OF STORKS

Well, this one is an old one actually. The notion “storks deliver babies” finds its roots deep in European folklore. The fanciful imagination of how Storks would listen to crooning new parents thereby tending to their wants, has found new angles every now and then. Not long ago, in the year 2009 we were served a beautiful short called “Partly Cloudy” by Pixar which had briefly yet amiably touched that very area. Now, with Warner Bros. Animation bringing back the idea to a fully-fledged version in the form of a movie, the concept literally brims alive.

PLOT OF THE STORKS MOVIE (SPOILERS FLYING WITH BABIES)

Storks have put an end to their baby delivering business. Cornerstone, their company has now moved on to a much profitable business of providing postal services. Headed under the aegis of Hunter (voiced by Kelsey Grammer), the visionary is about to promote Junior (voiced by Andy Samberg), the top deliverer of Cornerstone, to the position of ‘Boss’. However, he requires him to fire a girl named Tulip (voiced by Katie Crown), who was Cornerstone’s last undelivered baby. Tulip is trying her best to fit in the lifestyle of Storks, but unfortunately she is an epitome of obliteration, and Hunter wants him gone.

still of nate and his parents in storks movie

Meanwhile at Earth, a kid is trying his best to catch his busy parents’s attention. The ignored head Nate (Anton Starkman) is keen on having a baby brother so that he could have someone to play with. He writes a letter (or did an adult write that? :P) that gets delivered to Cornerstone. In a series of accidental chaotic events, where Junior is trying to get rid of Tulip, the old baby delivering machine becomes functional with that letter and a baby is produced.  Boy, is she the cutest thing?

What follows is one hell of a roller-coaster ride, with Junior trying to deliver the baby to its rightful address alongside Tulip, before anyone in the Cornerstone knows about it.

HUMOUR IN STORKS MOVIE

Storks movie packs in humour aplenty. The non-stop fun comedy will not let you settle down a bit. It is constantly trying to tickle you, sometimes too hard, sometimes effortlessly. The fact that the movie is so much reflective of our day to day work makes things even more relatable. That’s primarily why you laugh hard too.

In their little adventure to deliver the baby, Tulip and Junior come across an insane wolf pack that can take the shape of anything from a bridge to a boat to a submarine. It is hands down one of the funniest bits in the movie. Alpha Wolf and Beta Wolf are voiced by none other than Key and Peele themselves.

still of alpha and beta wolf licking baby in storks movie

Also, the part where an army of silent Penguins tries to attack the lead characters making sure that the baby doesn’t wake up, will have you in fits of laughter. Pigeon Toady voiced by Stephen Kramer Glickman is one psychotic angle to the tale that blends in a little perversion with fun.

The movie also tries to do a little mockery of how the advent of baby in one’s life changes so many things for parents. It goes on to show that insane cuteness comes at a price!

You can pre-order Storks movie here:

DOWNSIDES TO STORKS

One apparent downside that vexes you a bit is how Storks literally gallops. It is a constant run of frames that doesn’t stop even for a second to breathe. At times it tries its level best to pass on even average jests with its swift gait, so that you move on quickly to the next.

With no gravitas in its frames, the Storks movie fails to uplift the emotional quotient that the movie at one point tries to bank on. In that respect it stays miles away from the likes of Pixar. Everything stays scooched under 1 hour 27 minutes of screen-time, even though we could have really used a better editing.

GAVEL POUNDS

Even though Storks movie fails to do a Pixar in matters of sentient stories, it entertains us nevertheless with its snappy slapstick humour. The collaboration resuscitates the old forgotten lore that tries to celebrate lost stories. Even with its fun standpoint, we do get a comical entertainer in the end, and that’s what really matters.

If you wish to watch a whole load of cute, cuddlesome and Awwwwws, Storks is just the movie for you.

Here’s one cute trailer of Storks for you:

Pete’s Dragon Review (2016) | A Beautiful Retelling of Petes Dragon 1977

Pete’s Dragon is a beautifully revived and embellished idea that had gone lost in humdrums of life. Disney digs up a lost tale, primps, preens and touches it and lo! It turns green. Green’s a pun-wink of course.

DIRECTION OF PETE’S DRAGON

Enchanting direction! The depth of David Lowery’s direction is simply mind-boggling. His images speak of a winsome quiet, a rare calmness that allows you to feel the warmth of every scene that he tries to show. It is not rushed and retains plentiful focus. It allows you to feast on the magnificence of his settings.

He manages to whisk it beautifully with Elliott‘s, the Dragon’s puppy like demenaour. His ideas can be read through his frames, those that canter on the strides of “What would be the next possible course of action?” He does a fine blend of what is plausible and whimsical and manages to elicit a stunning feat that looks good both in imagination and theory.

PETES DRAGON CAST

Pete’s Dragon brings in the vanguard Oakes Fegley of the Fort Bliss fame, cashes in on his forever seeking eyes. He makes his character quite endearing to watch with that sad comportment he carries. We see him in that mood often throughout the movie, and the yen in his eyes to be home, the longing in his eyes as he looks up searching for Elliott, will have you feel sorry for him on numerous occasions.

still of Oakes Fegley in Petes Dragon movie

Bryce Dallas Howard’s gargantuan affairs continue as she finds herself wrapped in the totem of another reptilian movie right after she did Jurassic World last year. She plays Grace, the lady who tries to help the lost boy in the woods. Her’s is quite a relatable character something you would love to do any day – care for a child who has no whereabouts of his family or, for that to matter, life itself.

Karl Urban as Gavin brings home that nefarious element to the Dragon tale, claiming his pointless right over what he finds and captures. His is a comprehensible role, that you can put a pin to, and get along with, given the circumstances.

Wes Bentley could be found so much engaged in his acting, that you don’t find him doing much in the movie. Robert Redford as Meacham has Dragon glories to share, and his thoughtful comportment will have you listening to him just as kids listened to him in rapt attention. Oona Laurence plays Natalie quite convincingly too, and supports Pete right from the moment she finds him.

THE GREEN FRIENDLY DRAGON ELLIOTT

still of Elliott and Pete in Petes Dragon movie

Last but not the least: The Dragon Elliott. If you have a thing for dogs, you are going to fall for it instantly. Elliot’s acts are just like a dog’s, with its postural manners, playful acts, seeking eyes; everything is going to put it into a contour of an adorable puppy. Its disappearing act comes straight from the 1977 movie, which Disney decided to go with. There are sporadic moments of tranquility when the green dragon flies to show nature at its true flair to Pete. Those images leave you with a sense of contentment. Love Elliott has is unconditional. But it becomes ungainly thoughtful too.

PIECES TO WATCH OUT FOR (SPOILERS FLYING AHEAD)

If you are in the right rhythm of the movie, there are some instances there that you cannot certainly miss. Like the time Pete ends up in town only to storm away in his rare window of opportunity. You can read him well in those fleeting instances where he is cornered by a pacifying Grace, as he howls, nay, wails in pain. That yelp is meant for Elliott but gets lost in thin air. It is so impactful that it will definitely hurl you towards a whirlwind of sympathy for the poor child.

I loved the direction where the falling of Pete with a thud gets followed up brilliantly by the waking up of the Dragon. You can almost feel their connection. Also, the way the movie begins, with that abysmal tragedy that has been so beautifully shown through Pete’s perspective inside the car. The book that Pete carries “Elliott Gets Lost” literally defines his life, and stays at all times, well complemented by the surreal creature.

The fact that the dragon sneezes a bucketful of mucus instead of fire brings home that elemental twist of humour that is laughable. But he is a dragon after all, and he can only take so much. That monstrous mien in the end is aptly fit and only once, just when things begin to head south. However, Disney doesn’t fail to celebrate Elliott with all the goodies, finding its soul to forgive it in a split second.

MUSIC OF PETES DRAGON

This is where the movie truly scores as well. Not only is the score simply soothing to the ears, but it constantly puts you in a room full of jocularity. It has beautiful songs well edited. Lowery places them in right areas that accentuate the theme of Petes Dragon further. One of the most gorgeous songs that the movie retains is the Petes Dragon Song by Bonnie Prince Billy the lyrics of which you can find here: Lyrics of Dragon Song. It will make you fall for it at once. So soothing and artfully written.

DOWNSIDES OF PETE’S DRAGON

If you pay attention to the CGI of the movie, it fails to touch the levels of culmination you might have had in your head, given today’s heightened age of visual effects. Elliott appears to be more fantastical and imaginary. It doesn’t have that primal realism feel to look at, like all those successful reptilian movies in the past that had so beautifully triumphed in visuals.

still of Elliott from Petes Dragon movie

You can’t also oversee the fact 6 years in the wild, and the child still behaves in normalcy. When he finds a group of people coming, he doesn’t run away in sheer fear, also puts things under clouds of doubt. His reaction on finding new things for the first time in town doesn’t get milked enough. He comes straight from the savage world. But still doesn’t carry that bewilderment gaze whilst running and hopping over things he had forgotten all about. Things like that don’t go overlooked when perceived from a pragmatic vantage.

Screenplay of Pete’s Dragon goes to and fro. At times drops us brilliant lines, then most of the times lets its characters speak from their eyes.

PLOT SHORTCOMINGS

Another downside stays with the plot of Pete’s Dragon. It is something you have been constantly fed when a misunderstood beast story is considered. So you see every bit coming. Pete’s Tale is a clichéd story likes of which we had already seen in the form of The Good Dinosaur that Pixar did last year.

But you can’t shake off its backdrop either. It is very plausible which makes it an interesting fiction. It is quite remarkable how every open end in its story gets conjoined.

THE FINAL VERDICT

Pete’s Dragon is a spectacular retelling of the tale that saw the light for the first time in 1977. It doesn’t go dark being a Disney movie, but subtly skips through that part (in the beginning). Petes Dragon incessantly capers around the happy theme that it intends to walk on. Of course, Lowery’s direction makes it all the way better.

If you don’t delve into the clichéd side of it, you are going to love every bit of it. If you are a kid, there is nothing in the world you would want than being bestowed upon a friendly dragon for a pup.

Petes Dragon carries a stunning amiable tone that is outright perfect for your kid. It goes without saying, it is great for the fanciful whims that lurk inside you. A highly recommended movie for everybody.

Check out the trailer of Pete’s Dragon here:

The Good Dinosaur Review (2015)

“You are me, and more.”

The Good Dinosaur is an endearing speculation on a winsome possibility.

Disney and Pixar have been bringing the inanimate alive ever since they showed up in the animation arena. Their powerful CGI, splendid landscapes, heartwarming music, top-notch touching plots that complement their melting frames can hardly go unnoticed. It is as if you can feel the reality paint the big screen with their gorgeous animation. The Good Dinosaur is no different except you wish there was more to the story.

Even before the movie begins, we feast on a lovely short called “Sanjay’s Super Team”. It glorifies a subdued Indian animator Sanjay Patel which was a first in the animation world. The story of the short rotates around his childhood shenanigans with a mythical backdrop to it. The gist of the tale is captivating and you almost begin to wonder if children should ever be deprived of a fantastical world they live in.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

The Good Dinosaur score slithers in the background with a brilliant fusion that is downright riveting. The movie begins with the genius of an Apatosaurus family, keeping in mind the what-if-the-meteor-had-never-hit-us circumstance and focuses on how they are trying to earn their livelihood whilst attempting to leave their marks by being good at things.

Arlo is the most relatable creature, a protagonist trying to overcome his fears, whilst endeavouring to leave his mark too. A tragedy befalls him, a shattering one that breaks him to pieces, and flings his life into chaos. He meets an accident, gets lost amidst all the confusion and ends up in a foreign land. About the same time he meets one of the most adorable creatures, Spot, who is like a rabid-human who has lost his family and is wandering at large. Arlo befriends him in a quest to reach home and find his mark doing good to his friend.

The first thing that blows your mind away almost instantly is the level of imagination the creators have. Then you perceive how much work they have put into making their fantasy a reality. The level of details they incorporate whilst making a movie is really commendable. You can see every droplet move, crops dance, animals react and watch water come alive. They make the inanimate breathe, which is simply out of the world. True creators they are!

If you look at the plot, there is really not much to it. The movie being about the dino-era finds similar species to keep you entertained. Story and sub-plots seem to have been built deliberately and almost seem clichéd. The cute, snappy and slapstick humour of the flick however will constantly engage you in fits of laughter. Arlo and Spot are just adorable.

The movie like every other Pixar movie is a lesson per se with brilliant thoughtful liners that escape from the mouths of different creatures. Screenplay is well written, at times however you wish there was more substance to it.

A delightful movie about a thoughtful wonderful what-if!

Big Hero 6 Review (2014)

Big Hero 6 is an endearing animated flick.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

Even before we begin, Walt Disney does a Pixar in the very beginning of the movie, and brings an amazing short through the eyes of the cutest terrier that you will ever see, the foodie Winston. So beautifully portrayed! Winston is a true hero. Besides does it get better than this, when you get to watch two movies in a single ticket?

Big Hero 6 starts with rad humour and some cool story build up until we reach Tadashi’s so-fluffy-that-I-am-gonna-die invention. The giant wonder is a health-care robot who is goofy without trying. Things that it does just by being itself, packs up another layer of fun.

The button-faced fluff might be the face of the flick, but the true hero is the genius Hiro. The child prodigy is really good when it comes to presentation or kicking some robo-ass. Also watch out for the funny Fred who will jiggle you for sure. And Stan Lee? What were you doing here?

“I don’t wanna lose you too.”

The drama is enriching to the script. Screenplay is pretty good for an animation movie. CGI is also pretty amazing.

Downsides: There isn’t a lot of background bustle when it comes to showing ruckus on streets. The focus is always on the main characters of the movie. And sometimes you wonder – Where is everybody? Even the story ends up with clichés and a predictable sojourn.

Not looking at all of that, it still is a complete entertainment package, with action, drama and some great decent laughs on its way to become a franchise I surmise. Recommended!