“It was an enchanting old ruin.”

The Grand Budapest Hotel is drenched in literary awesomeness, Wes Anderson’s beautiful adventurous tale is about the life of a concierge named Gustave, who develops a friendship with a loyal Lobby Boy Zero Moustafa, a young immigrant from the East, on account of a misfortune that fires an avalanche of events. Set in a span between the World Wars, the story is basically a narration from a writer, who had met a hollow version of Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel, who in turn narrates every account of his and Gustave’s adventure to him. (Talk about Inception eh!)

Screenplay is just marvellous. It touches bits of humour quite subtly. The direction is top notch just the way Wes likes to depict his cinema. If you have seen his previous works you would know how brilliantly he projects his frames and takes you to a different world altogether. You couldn’t help but marvel at the way he rotates his camera and runs into inanimate things for focus. He leaves most of the action part to our vivid imagination. Built backdrops and landscapes in the flick are quite artistic and perfectly manifested with a unique animation.

Wes carves his writing gorgeously, as occasionally he slips into splendid poetic verses beautifully enunciated by Ralph Fiennes. The story runs great along with some exceptional editing. A gripping adventure that breathes on outstanding performances by Fiennes, Norton, Dafoe, Brody, Goldblum and Revolori. Even though it had a stellar cast, actors like Bill Murray, Jude Law, Tom Wilkinson, Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton, Jason Schwartzman basically had cameos.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is simply a glimpse into the creative head of Wes Anderson. It is a remarkable feat in comedy and direction and a must watch for people who love quality cinema.