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Finding Dory Review (2016) | Adorable, Profound and Humorous

A-DOR-able! Finding Dory is as extraordinary as its predecessor in terms of drama, CGI and humour. What it also is, like every other movie in the Pixar universe, an edutainment bandwagon that keeps steering towards the thoughtful learning curve.

Even after more than a decade Pixar manages to bring back the panache of the first. The movie has Dory written all over it, with the heart-melting cuteness of young Dory voiced endearingly by Sloane Murray. Pixar does occasional visits to depict glimpses from the past which gives us plenty of baby Dory to enjoy. Also, it is thoroughly entertaining and packs in humour galore.

still of baby dory in finding dory movie


There is something about the notion of forgetting, which is profusely poetic. Amnesiac Dory’s inclusion, that started for mere fun in the Nemo franchise, ended up getting a profound treatment, and Pixar has a knack to identify the fervent. There is no doubt humour lurking in things that grind out from someone’s mishap, but to truly live the horror of the fallen is what makes you empathize. Andrew Stanton and Angus MacLane milks this very fact with an unrivalled flair as they leave us swimming in the shoes…er…fins of Dory, when her life seems like a lost affair.


Before we even get on the Finding Dory joyride, we are allowed to feast on a beautiful Pixar short called Piper. The short gorgeously helmed by Alan Barillaro is a visual feat that cashes in on a baby Sandpiper’s life.

still of Piper short by Pixar before Finding Dory movie

There is so much education holed up in those ephemeral 6 minutes that you cannot thank Alan enough to have thought something so winning. I wouldn’t spoil it for ya! Go ahead and watch. You will know!


Finding Dory’s most powerful moment is when she realizes that her parents could be dead all this time. Also when she percolates out alone with her thoughts, totally clueless of where should she go. It has an element of dark to it, very shattering as she ends up being masticated by dismay. The music touches the melancholic chords there. But just then the reunion happens, and it will fill you up with tears of joy.

still of hank and dory in finding dory movie

The whole team of Dory, starting with Hank, Bailey (watch him use his echolocation skills) and Destiny voiced brilliantly by Ed O’ Neill, Ty Burrell and Kaitlin Olson are all endearing additions to the franchise. They complete the tale helping her out to achieve what she set out for in the first place.


Searching hard for the downside of Finding Dory, we don’t get to see both sides of the coin like we did in the previous installment, so it was harder to relate to what her parents were going through all this time.

Au contraire, in Finding Nemo we were constantly grinding in the distress of a father who had just lost his child. It was adventurous as there were unexplored corners of the ocean, and a whole new enclave to look forward to. Sadly, here everything seems convoluted in one place.


Finding Dory is constantly flinging at us the importance of saving the ocean life, rehabilitating the weaker species and helping them out in dire situations. It is a lesson to those who don’t care.

A beautiful, beautiful movie!

Check out the trailer of Finding Dory here:

Asterix and Obelix: Mansion of the Gods Review (2014)

Asterix and the gang ventures into 3D animated waters for the first time, and I must say it was quite delightful to watch them breathe alive on the big screen. All those big shiny noses and their clumsy acts look just brilliant in CGI.

Asterix and Obelix: Mansion of the Gods wouldn’t disappoint you. It is funny, featuring slapstick comedy, more of a situational provocation brought to you by the Roman invasion and the debatable empty heads of the Gauls. The plot is well written and is taken from the comic The Mansion of the Gods. The relentless Caesar walks in again with a master plan to ingest the Gaulish by building Mansion of the Gods, a new territory near their village for the Romans to populate. The story saunters around to and fro as both parties keep fighting with each other for the land.

A majority of the scenes in the beginning have been stretched, and sometimes the movie topples into the non-funny zone. But still the low comedy manages to beam up the down. Every character in the movie is a hoot. Caesar brings in the grim but the people who surround him wouldn’t make him look deadly. Someone or something would do something stupid every now and then and you would end up in fits of laughter.

The fun doesn’t stop at any point. A lot of fish slaps, cloud brawls, boar hunting and fake-fighting drive in the hilarious nail. Although you feel the ending dies out pretty quickly, you still get a brilliant feast to devour, as you laugh your way out of the theatre with a contended look.

A really entertaining flick. Kids are going to love it. It would be a great way to tell them the legacy of Asterix if they haven’t come across the comic hero hitherto.

Airlift Review (2016)

A historical achievement enfeebled by poor film-making! Airlift is mediocre. Period.

Yes, we had a great plot in our baggage. A true story intended to pan out a biopic that could have turned heads, made some noise about the plight of 170000 stuck Indians in a warzone. An immaculate rescue operation that was so colossal that it lodged its name in the Guinness Book of World Records for being one of the largest evacuations of all times.

But what does Menon do with it? He changes facts, people, creates sheer fiction, rules out details, comes with a hand-woven shoddy script to replace the truth, places his own fake characters to enrich melodrama, throws in some songs in there to deliberately connect with the Indian audience, enforces unrealistic patriotism for emphasis, and squeezes in pointless unwanted tantrums to say the least.


The movie begins by depicting the lavish life of the protagonist whilst noisily pointing out how little Katyal, a big fish in the Kuwait business suburbs, thought of his homeland. He had turned, as suggested by a brayed intentional laugh of his friends, more Kuwaitian than a Kuwaitian himself. These bits again seemed forced rather than appear natural so as to benefit the script.

Chaos depicted by some pathetic CGI bombing, tanks and helicopters raids manifest how little we have progressed in movie making. Third grade young actors chosen here try to scare you with guns and a foreign accent. They fail terribly at it. Their acts were excruciatingly unpromising as they try to kick someone lethargically on the butt, shoot people to nail in absent fear, make advances at young girls, or occasionally stop people for intimidating enquiry. Amidst all the mayhem Akshay Kumar cries which somehow doesn’t blend in with the unconvincing setup. Also, when he runs home to not discover his wife and child, whilst looking unperturbed by the snot lazily hanging from his nose (which seemed a very forceful shot by Menon BTW), really squeezed out acting from him, which pretty soon disappeared in its next impending frames. Menon tries to shoehorn drama in there which seemed more enacted to have ever reached a gut-wrenching point.

What was however quite endearing to watch was how the movie unfurls into better horizons from there as the protagonist starts taking effective measures to get the job done. The way the story oscillates with the ‘how’ is the crux of the flick. It however also tries to milk a character called George, played by Prakash Belawadi, depictive of a head that doesn’t work well with the mass. What it failed to cash on was its moniker. The fact that Air India flew over 488 air planes in a war-hit zone was humongous, but it was vaguely mentioned in a daft line by Akshay. True heroics get overshadowed right there.

After watching this you will miss Neeraj Pandey big time, or even hope the likes of Anurag Kashyap, Dibakar Banerjee or even the newcomer Neeraj Ghaywan to have picked this up. Airlift failed to engage and rivet us. The music couldn’t captivate us and there was hardly an adrenaline moment to keep our jaws wide open for long. To say that it even came close to the likes of Argo would be downright foolish.

Alas! the damage has been done. What you have is mediocre served on your platter! What could have turned into something phenomenal ends up being an average Indian mainstream movie. It is quite unfortunate that the Indian mass loves this kind of stuff. I would call it nothing but an average crowd entertainer.

Go with lesser expectations and you might enjoy it.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Review (2015)

“I know all about waiting.”

Behold y’awl! The Force has finally awakened! Star Wars: The Force Awakens is everything you wanted the Star Wars sequel to be.

After spending almost a decade devoid of force, J.J. Abrams walks in with the next big installment of the immortal saga with a brilliant plot in his baggage. Star Wars: The Force Awakens does the franchise justice it deserves. The sequel series has once again commenced and it has one of the most pragmatic plots in its vanguard. It at once gallops to answer ‘what could have happened next’ with three young actors to take the ‘new’ story-line forward.

Here we get a new perspective altogether for the first time, unlike previous installments, of a sentient Stormtrooper who doesn’t wish to be evil. John Boyega might have played a clumsy character for the better half but he is onto something big. Finn is scared but there is something good in him that compels him to do the right thing. Also, he brings an element of humour to the tale.

Daisy Ridley’s Rey wears an endearing personality throughout the flick and plays a crucial role whilst packing a fair protagonist punch trying to figure out her connection with the force. To watch Adam Driver play the badass antagonist was awesome. His voice was heavy like Vader’s, his deeds terrifying, and his anger destructive.

Oscar Isaac’s Poe Dameron can’t be ignored either. His flying capabilities remind you of Luke’s bad-ass runs from the prequels. There is one single shot where Po flies the X-Wing and performs so many thrilling take-downs. It was brilliantly taken from Finn’s vantage. Snoke braces us with a cameo that clears the dust for an impending doom. Andy Serkis hammers another CGI to perfection.

The flick has elements that will haul you back in time with nostalgia. Reminiscent references, images, and characters from the previous parts cloud the screen quite often and you just can’t help pointing them out like Easter eggs. Be it be the badass Vader music in just a mere glimpse, or a circular frame-changer like the one used in previous parts, it has every element shoehorned in to call it a definite Star Wars movie.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is a brilliant tribute to the most revered tale in the whole universe. If you haven’t watched it yet, just run to the theatres already! May the force be with you!

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Review (2014)

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is a perfect example of how to make a perfect movie.

We saw the gradual development of a baby ape into an intelligent leader in Rise. In Dawn, we see him reign.

Reeves offers us an insight, a glimpse about the impending chaos in a Simian afflicted world. He spends hours into character building, the crucial element to any flick, where a director makes you feel ‘value’ and ‘importance’ of every soul at large. With apes spending more time on screen than humans, the title of the flick justifies.


There is Koba, the bad-ass scarred ape, who defies the leader of the herd with his differences and engenders villainy and exasperates chaos. Maurice, the lovely and loyal orangutan, is charming as ever, whilst Blue Eyes wears an apt role exhuming strong emotional vibes, his best part being: where Reeves uses his perceptive to show the ugly side of war, the absorption of the aftermath on a young amateur heart, the effects of violence, the dread, the fallen victims and the cadavers of the innocents. The war presentation was drenched in beauty.

Caesar emanates pizazz. We see him develop into a more thoughtful and intelligent being. The maturity that adorns his countenance makes him stand out from the rest. His personality would put you in awe.

The CGI is marvelous. It was thrilling to watch each and every Serkis emotion captured into a series of dark and grim frames impeccably.

On the humans counter, we have Jason, Gary, Kodi and Keri in the driving seat as crucial elements trying to help their own species for survival, by gathering resources for sustenance. The fear in the eyes of Jason Clarke is natural and relatable, when he ventures himself into the ape territory. A strange blend of geniality and fear persists whenever he is around Caesar and he dons it brilliantly.

If we take the downsides of the movie into account, we find a clichéd tale that has probably been narrated many times before in epic tragedies. There is no element of surprise in the flick. Nothing memorable to cherish too. Matt needs to take these factors into account, whilst directing the next sequel.

But overlooking the above fact, we do have a brilliant moulding of a tale that is on its way to become an epic saga of Caesar, his scion Blue eyed wonder, probably the next possible leader, an ape family who is willing to follow the footsteps of its leader, extinction of humans and their gasp for survival in a Simian-ridden Earth and a fight for coexistence – nature’s felony of keeping predators and preys in one basket.

Big Hero 6 Review (2014)

Big Hero 6 is an endearing animated flick.


Even before we begin, Walt Disney does a Pixar in the very beginning of the movie, and brings an amazing short through the eyes of the cutest terrier that you will ever see, the foodie Winston. So beautifully portrayed! Winston is a true hero. Besides does it get better than this, when you get to watch two movies in a single ticket?

Big Hero 6 starts with rad humour and some cool story build up until we reach Tadashi’s so-fluffy-that-I-am-gonna-die invention. The giant wonder is a health-care robot who is goofy without trying. Things that it does just by being itself, packs up another layer of fun.

The button-faced fluff might be the face of the flick, but the true hero is the genius Hiro. The child prodigy is really good when it comes to presentation or kicking some robo-ass. Also watch out for the funny Fred who will jiggle you for sure. And Stan Lee? What were you doing here?

“I don’t wanna lose you too.”

The drama is enriching to the script. Screenplay is pretty good for an animation movie. CGI is also pretty amazing.

Downsides: There isn’t a lot of background bustle when it comes to showing ruckus on streets. The focus is always on the main characters of the movie. And sometimes you wonder – Where is everybody? Even the story ends up with clichés and a predictable sojourn.

Not looking at all of that, it still is a complete entertainment package, with action, drama and some great decent laughs on its way to become a franchise I surmise. Recommended!