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Ghostbusters Review (2016) | Easter Eggs Galore But Falls Flat

A tribute to the original. Funny at times but falls flat big time. Anything about Ghostbusters and it takes us back in time. The Ivan Reitman project was hands down colossal. You watch it even in this era and it still manages to leave its impression on you. Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters comes nowhere close to bringing that old anxious charm of the original. It is funny alright, but there is nothing that could bring it close let alone surpass the levels of Reitman’s work.


Ghostbusters skims on the surface of the original, so there is nothing extraordinary that the movie has to offer, except for glimpses, characters and ghosts from the past that fill you up with nostalgia. There are plenty of elements from the 1984 gang strewn all across the movie. You might go, “Ah! There he is!” or “Oooh! Oooh! That’s from the old one!”

Clinging to the original fun theme of the movie, that neither goes too dark or stays too aloof from it, Ghostbusters manages to walk well on what it was proposed to canter on. However, there isn’t an element of surprise lurking anywhere here. The world Paul Feig creates is unaffected by ghosts, the multitude of dumbness, who stay unfazed by the lives of any ghostbuster, unaware of what’s going on. They seem to come in as they please, react when it seems fit to them.

Feig’s direction goes to awkward enclaves when he constantly keeps chopping off frames quickly moving on from one scene to another without caring enough for the audience to take it in. You can witness the shoddy editing go strangely awry at so many points that it creates a portal of disconnect.


Still of Chris Hemsworth as Kevin in Ghostbusters movie

Chris Hemsworth as Kevin is probably the funniest thing in Ghostbusters. The only notable and memorable element that you might want to talk about in the long run, owing to the levels of dumbness he is shown scaling. Kristen Wiig’s Erin Gilbert has an instant apparent crush on him and she aces it with her superb comic timing.

Kate McKinnon builds up a strange character Jillian Holtzmann which is oddly satisfying. She does most of the work for the team. She has this eccentric cool style that will make you love her instantly.


There are plenty of cameos to watch out for. First of all, all those major characters from the 1984 movie pop up every now and then at odd hours namely: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Ernie Hudson. Not to forget Annie Potts who reprises her role as the desk receptionist here as well. Ozzy Osbourne shows up at one point too which was a pleasant surprise. Slimer the green ghost gets to drive the Ecto 1. It was good to see him revived after so long.

still of slimer in ghostbusters movie 2016

The ugly part of it all was that their inclusion seemed oddly forced. There was no subtlety to it. No jokes flew when they were there and that makes it look utterly fabricated. Camera zooms in at a lot of places to deliberately show a past reference. Easter Eggs are like lying in front of the camera for 2 minutes for you to notice.


If you divide the movie in subsections, you will realize that the movie does fairly well in the first half. In the later half Ghostbusters’ humour simply drops dead. If you focus on how it manages to bring back every character from the past, you will have nothing less than goosebumps on your body. Humour comes naturally with the inclusion of Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig. But if you look at it as a complete movie, sadly it fails to dilate your eyes.

Check out the trailer of Ghostbusters movie:

In the Heart of the Sea Review (2015)

“My soul is dead.”

A poetic and arresting take on one of the deadliest fictional water beasts.

Nathaniel Philbrick’s In the Heart of the Sea is an entirely different take on Moby Dick, a different vantage that pays tribute to the most beloved tales of all times. The plot begins with Herman Melville played by a bearded Ben Whishaw visiting Nickerson, a survivor of the Whaleship Essex that went down owing to a tragedy that befell the entire crew when they encountered a gigantic sperm whale. Melville is bent on squeezing out the horror from Nickerson’s eyes into his leaflets because he believes it to be one of the greatest stories he has ever come across.

Philbrick’s perspective is exceptional. Ron Howard cashes in on it just fine. He follows the tale with eye threatening close ups and water-shots to jackhammer the dread quotient. Wonderful whale shots have been captured. Essex-sailing, the squall, whale-hunting have been depicted splendidly. It was a joy to watch the beast breathe alive for the first time in the sea. The size of that thing! The satellite shot ensured the audience scaled it amidst puny boats.

The better part of the movie runs in a diegesis which has been brilliantly written. The score often moves around the soothing notes of a viola that makes the flick a heartwarming watch. Whales have been subtly shown, never given a proper focus, reflecting – just like you would be bewitched by its swiftness in real life. The beast is a beauty! Tiniest of details on its flank have been manifested subtly. Then there is that badass tail. Watch that beauty surge!

What In the Heart of the Sea fails to milk is the “Chase-Pollard” rivalry. It had no Rush charm to it. Coffin’s role too seemed like a cameo which could have possibly unfurled into a possible brilliant feud. The young Nickerson played by Tom Holland was simply an eye in a tale. His character adds little value to an ongoing stream. Tom is an outstanding actor however he gets lost under the doldrums of their unfortunate tragedy, and often gets overshadowed by the movie’s protagonists. Matthew Joy’s character seemed like a crucial build; however Murphy wasn’t allowed to show off his acting prowess. Flick’s editing made sure of that.


One of the hardest choices Chase has to make when he finally gets a clean shot on the whale and he chooses not to take it. Whilst the writer leaves that bit for viewer interpretation, it is quite poetic if you really look at it. Chase was convinced they were flung into the jaws of chaos owing to the job they did. He throws the idea to Pollard in one of the finest conversations they had in the entire movie. He starts to believe everything they went through was because they were hunting and killing whales for profit. He takes the sperm whale to be an eye-opener.

He looks it in the eye and whilst the world wonders why he doesn’t budge, he silently lets the beast go thus saving his crew from another mishap. All those segments have been beautifully depicted by Ron. It is really hard to show such bits via a movie but he nails it anyhow.

Also the survival tale reeks of an emotional trauma when the crew resorts to cannibalism. It hasn’t been depicted but the words and the diegetic tone are enough to give you an idea. It is a terrible thing to have happened. Howard ensures he keeps things subtle whilst touching such a delicate topic.

Charles Leavitt’s screenplay is downright gorgeous. There isn’t a moment you don’t marvel at his beautiful words. They are drenched in literary awesomeness. There are so many points wherein I felt my ears tingle with powerful words.

I would highly recommend this movie to everyone. It is a beautiful tribute to Herman Melville and his super-rad legendary creation Moby Dick.