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Peter Rabbit Movie Review (2018) | Plainly Made For Kids

Peter Rabbit Movie is an entertainer alright, and it does try to resuscitate the age-old story by Beatrix Potter which is great, to be frank. Long lost tales should show up every now and then because I highly doubt Millenials would ever hear about them otherwise.

Sadly this new adaptation by Will Gluck isn’t really as humorous as it was supposed to be if you look at it with a critical eye. How can the James Corden voiced bunny not be funny? Everything boils down to the writing, of course.

There are so many moments in the flick that will give away the fact that the writers were trying really hard to deliberately make the conversations funny. Unfortunately, they didn’t know they were simply worsening things.

Peter Rabbit movie is ridden with so many flaws that you can’t stop yourself from shaking your head every now and then. Apart from the bad writing, even the direction fails to impress you. In a world where live action-computer animated movies, like Ted and Paddington, are doing so well, the rabbit fails to win the race yet again.

A Movie For Kids

Looking at the bright side, which we should always practice, Peter Rabbit movie amuses you nevertheless and brings a smile to your face. It is supposed to be a light movie that should be enjoyed for its characters (I am afraid there are only a few that are memorable). The presence of great actors Rose Byrne and Domhnall Gleeson even though how comic they become at times, their characters have been made really brittle.

Peter Rabbit Movie the rabbit kin

But I get it. It is supposedly made for children. If you take that quotient into account, you will realize that kids are going to love it. And they absolutely do. But if you take into consideration minor aspects of the flick, you will begin to see so many pointless things lurking that it is downright painful.

In the animation front, it does great. The CGI of Peter Rabbit is just brilliant. Expressions are very careful capturing even the minutiae of fauna. They have merged the frames quite meticulously, and the flow seems proper.

The Plot of Peter Rabbit Movie

Peter Rabbit, his cousin Benjamin (Colin Moody) and sisters Flopsy (Margot Robbie), Mopsy (Elizabeth Debicki) and Cotton-Tail (Daisy Ridley)are on constant war with Mr. Joe McGregor (Sam Neill) when the latter meets a heart attack.

Peter Rabbit, now claiming that he has murdered him, invites rest of the jungle creatures to McGregor’s, having a party rampaging his garden. It is when an uptight estranged nephew of the deceased McGregor, Thomas played by Domhnall Gleeson, inherits the house and shows up at their gates when the war between the rabbits and Thomas McGregor begins.

The War (Spoilers)

Thomas used to work in Harrods from where he was fired for losing his temper when he wasn’t promoted – a McGregorian curse.

Bea (Rose Byrne) is a next door neighbor to McGregor’s newly inherited house. Thomas’ intent is to sell the house and open a rival shop next to Harrods. For which he begins to build a wall to keep the menacing mongers out, even though Bea objects to it. Having a soft corner for her makes hurting those rabbits a difficult task even though on one occasion he nearly drowns Benjamin, PR’s cousin.

Bea and Thomas begin to fall in love and that’s probably from where the movie starts to become a tad indigestible. Up until this point, the movie feels great but it begins to lose its validity when you see the rabbits constantly involved in the life of what Thomas and Bea do. It’s like a cinema that they are constantly watching like they have nothing else to do. Their routine life changes from stealing vegetables from Thomas’ garden to becoming all about what Bea is doing.

I miss being helpful. A parent or grandparent comes into this shop looking for a gift for the child they love. I ask a few simple questions and know exactly what they need. I love helping people get what they want. Especially when they don’t even know that they want it. Those are the best.

The real war begins based upon that element of jealousy that Peter Rabbit houses and transforms into something ugly. When the intent of killing Thomas takes another form, Thomas returns the favour by filling their tree-house with dynamite. One freaky accident avalanches erupting the tree which falls on Bea’s art studio. Seeing through the cover, and judging Thomas for who he really was, she ends the relationship.

Going Back to London

Thomas goes back to London to work for Harrods again while Bea is ready to leave her house. Peter Rabbit feeling bad for what he did since he was responsible for the detonation that caused the tree to erupt, decides to visit London to apologize to Peter and bring him back to stop Bea from leaving. Benjamin and Peter both end up at Harrod’s and convince him to return.

In the nick of time, Thomas returns apologizing to Bea, whilst Peter Rabbit comes forward to show that he was the one who had detonated the dynamite and that Thomas was innocent. A snobbish couple walks in to live in Thomas’ house since he had already sold it to them despite Thomas’ refusal. Peter Rabbit and his friends then show them that the house was infested with living creatures and that it was simply unlivable.

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The Roots

The intelligent bits lie in how the bookish elements are preserved without blemishing it. Like the part where Peter Rabbit asks the portrait of his parents about what needs be done, and they reflect Peter’s imagination. Also, the part where they show how Peter Rabbit’s dad had died was brilliantly illustrated reviving the book once again.

Peter talking to Thomas as the latter admits how highly improbable it was, is that subtle hint at human fancies that winks at wishful thinking and what makes human brain all the very much interesting.

Peter Rabbit Movie Wallpaper

The Final Verdict

Peter Rabbit movie is alright if you look at it from a child’s perspective. But for a purist, it might not be. For kids, it helps them put a face to a story, understand that a character as interesting as him ever thrived in a book.

Check out other movie reviews where Gleeson was a part of.

The Revenant Review (2015)

The Revenant is a gruesome gore blended with the right dose of beauty. Grisly and grizzly is written all over it. The biopic that carefully walks on the edges of jaws of death that Glass managed to return from, couldn’t have possibly ended up being more complete and perfect.

“My heart bleeds. But revenge is in the creator’s hands.”

Aforesaid escapes Hikuc’s mouth, a Pawnee who happens to the protagonist amidst complete chaos. He walks in and out of his life like a savior whose only intent seemed to resuscitate his dead and pass on the above rad message.

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu is a genius behind the lens. Right from the very beginning you can’t help but notice how he walks you amongst the characters. With clean close up shots taken right next to individuals he lets you stay with them, feel the angst, the immediate pain and empathize. His famous long uncut shots are persistent here as well as they complete big takes without breaking the flow. His genius can be seen in parts where the camera swifts gorgeously between pumped-up killing characters on the battle ground and stays on the ones living till their death knell resounds. He even captures breath-gasps on screen by giving a proper follow up to its characters for emphasis.

Leonardo DiCaprio is downright exceptional. To say he ate real bison liver and slept in animal carcass would be to say the least. He wears the skin of Hugh Glass like a pro. There is a constant tension he carries throughout the movie where his brows barely relax and rarely speak of relief. The bear mauling bit is one jaw dropping memorable scene that will forever haunt us in our dreams. To fight right to the moment of being incapacitated was something he aced to perfection. The aftermath of the attack where he loses his vocals, speaks with a wheezing sound, hisses and coughs whilst talking, drinking and eating, are all marvelously mastered.

The Revenant reeks of heart-melting pathos. One of the saddest bits in the flick is when Glass crawls his way to his son’s cadaver. He stops twice whilst doing so taken aback by the sight of the blood and the corpse as he puts his head on his chest, and says:

“I am not leaving you, son. I am right here.”

If you wish to see pain personified, behold Leo’s eyes! Period. To watch him gnaw on that Bison liver whilst knowing it was the real one, couldn’t help you feel sorry for him. To see him get under the quilts of horse flesh naked to beat the cold and all odds, was how you would have wanted the Glass story to be like.

Watching The Revenant is like watching the enthralling head of Emmanuel Lubezki. Tranquil frames visit one by one amidst the crawling story, engaging you with its magnificence. Shots of winter ridden trees, capped mountains, frozen leaves, dewed branches, bubbles of water sluggishly moving ‘neath the river, cloudy moon shots are all badass results of Lubezki grandeur.

The Revenant is an intriguing affair with nature. You behold the might of nature in the biting cold, the hailing storm, big slaps of relentless water that take the protagonist down (water-shot was brilliantly taken as well) and animal savagery in the punishing snow and feel them tingling your bones. It celebrates gore fights where fingers get chopped off, ears plucked off, heads lanced with arrows. Downright brutality!

In all that barbarity, there is beauty lurking in its originality. The way things happened has been given precedence. That’s what makes it special and unique. It is a cold blooded biopic, played outrageously well by its ingenious actors.

Fitzgerald played by Tom Hardy can’t be ignored either. He isn’t all evil, but with one knee in perversion, he could have been anyone put in a dire situation. But he was the one insinuating trouble from the very beginning, trying to justify his act by pointing “you blinked” and attempting to put justice to his killing act. Tom Hardy plays John extremely well with his brilliant accent, and thoughtful eyes that he carries whilst giving explanations.

Bridger is a character that could have been any one. So Poulter plays him with perfection. A little kind to begin with, yet overpowered by power. Not exactly wimpy either but a stone trampled down by Fitzgerald, left without a choice.

The music of the flick is apt. Complements the sadistic theme the flick runs on. It is uplifting in a way, always suggestive of the imminent revenge lurking in the corner. Screenplay is confined, but is no doubt great.

There are brilliant well-thought of parts strewn all across the movie. Hugh’s dreams are quite poetic. They are well supported by whispers and a majestic backdrop that impart meaning. The music there too supplements it. Little things like, a bird escaping from the heart of Glass’ wife signifies her soul leaving the body. One time when Glass is hungry as hell, he sees a herd of deer crossing the river. He imagines he has a rifle, points the stick at them and signals shooting them. Such games of despair!

As the movie concludes, we see the wife of Glass conjuring him, ultimately leaving him alone yet again. It was a perfect way to end it. A typical Inarritu finish that leaves you with questions! The aforementioned is suggestive of how eager Glass was to visit his wife, but he is bereft of death once again. Sheer amazeballs!

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Review (2015)

“I know all about waiting.”

Behold y’awl! The Force has finally awakened! Star Wars: The Force Awakens is everything you wanted the Star Wars sequel to be.

After spending almost a decade devoid of force, J.J. Abrams walks in with the next big installment of the immortal saga with a brilliant plot in his baggage. Star Wars: The Force Awakens does the franchise justice it deserves. The sequel series has once again commenced and it has one of the most pragmatic plots in its vanguard. It at once gallops to answer ‘what could have happened next’ with three young actors to take the ‘new’ story-line forward.

Here we get a new perspective altogether for the first time, unlike previous installments, of a sentient Stormtrooper who doesn’t wish to be evil. John Boyega might have played a clumsy character for the better half but he is onto something big. Finn is scared but there is something good in him that compels him to do the right thing. Also, he brings an element of humour to the tale.

Daisy Ridley’s Rey wears an endearing personality throughout the flick and plays a crucial role whilst packing a fair protagonist punch trying to figure out her connection with the force. To watch Adam Driver play the badass antagonist was awesome. His voice was heavy like Vader’s, his deeds terrifying, and his anger destructive.

Oscar Isaac’s Poe Dameron can’t be ignored either. His flying capabilities remind you of Luke’s bad-ass runs from the prequels. There is one single shot where Po flies the X-Wing and performs so many thrilling take-downs. It was brilliantly taken from Finn’s vantage. Snoke braces us with a cameo that clears the dust for an impending doom. Andy Serkis hammers another CGI to perfection.

The flick has elements that will haul you back in time with nostalgia. Reminiscent references, images, and characters from the previous parts cloud the screen quite often and you just can’t help pointing them out like Easter eggs. Be it be the badass Vader music in just a mere glimpse, or a circular frame-changer like the one used in previous parts, it has every element shoehorned in to call it a definite Star Wars movie.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is a brilliant tribute to the most revered tale in the whole universe. If you haven’t watched it yet, just run to the theatres already! May the force be with you!