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Inferno Movie Review (2016) | Robert Langdon Burns in Inferno’s Mediocrity

Skipping The Lost Symbol altogether Ron Howard was asked to do the Inferno movie instead. Unfortunately, Ron’s Robert Langdon franchise isn’t really doing so great when you take into account the colossal success of Dan Brown’s books. Do you wonder – is it because of Ron Howard’s direction? Or whether is it because it takes away almost everything from a book when a director is trying to give us a gist through his frames. The latter, right?

Well that’s an enclave we cannot help moving towards, given the limited time frame allotted to directors. But then of course there are things that we could definitely furbish so that the end result doesn’t look all impoverished in sheer adequacy at least.

INFERNO MOVIE PLOT

Inferno finds Tom Hanks reprise his role as the renowned professor Robert Langdon yet again. This time however he is shaken and messed up by what looks like a probable head injury. He wakes up in a hospital with Dr. Sienna Brooks played by Felicity Jones tending to him. Soon bullets ensue coming from a stout Vayentha. What follows is a quest to figure out what, who and why someone had him drugged whilst trying to decode Dante’s morphed map of hell that he found in a Faraday pointer in his belongings.

still of Tom Hanks and Felicity Jones in Inferno movie

The attempt is then to foil a deadly plan of mass killing that Bertrand Zobrist (Ben Foster), a billionaire debatable visionary has hidden in an unknown place. Inferno movie retains a great culminating point (which was terribly shown) which basically helps it to fight the franchise’s redundancy. But alas! It’s not enough!

DOZENS OF ISSUES (SPOILERS AHEAD)

The beauty of a Dan Brown novel lies in the fact that you are constantly decrypting codes alongside protagonists. That’s where the thrill lies. Figuring everything out by yourself, that makes you feel kind of intelligible. Au contraire, a movie however gambols on leaving you with a distasteful serum. You are trying to figure out something, but you realize the actor has already figured it out. That’s where the blame to ‘movie editing’ should really flare toward.

Glimpses that Robert Langdon see of Inferno, though abounding with theatrics vex you too much with their flickering lights. It doesn’t let you garb frames in a proper focus. Sometimes you can’t help but wonder where did Howard’s tranquility go?

Then the worst one is how Ron Howard decides to mess with the story. We find Elizabeth Sinskey portrayed by Sidse Babett Knudsen as Robert Langdon’s former love interest. In an attempt to slow down a bit, Ron keeps stretching their absent chemistry beyond limit. It is almost as if he rushed in towards the ending just to reach a dead end. That’s where the movie actually slows down a bit, and lets you swallow focus. But really! We could have lived without that cheap twist Ron.

Even though the betrayal and it’s follow up was brilliantly shot, Ron Howard went as far as to change the ending. According to Ron, Sienna ends up becoming the ‘immature’ girl in the Inferno movie, which wasn’t really the case.

CONTRASTING ACTORS

One of those actors who seemed to be acting extraordinarily well for a highly paced movie was Irrfan Khan. His flair for dialogues as he broods for a while before delivering his lines brings along all the experience he has garnered over the years as an actor. His portrayal of Harry Sims The Provost though limited was beautifully carved.

still of irrfan khan as Harry Sims The Provost in inferno movie

Then there was the worst one too. Christoph Bouchard, portrayed by Omar Sy ladies and gentleman! even though he is a good actor, he seems a tad out of place. As if it wasn’t supposed to be his timeline at all. There is no subtlety when he assigns his agents to follow up a feigned lead, and then goes to contact Langdon and Brooks.

So now you know Dan Brown books are way better than the movies, you can order the illustrative Inferno book from here:

THE FINAL VERDICT

As the old maxim goes, “Read the book!”, I wouldn’t recommend anyone to watch Robert Langdon movies. All that Dan Brown knowledge that slithers on to cryptic leaflets go poof, if you choose to watch its movie instead. Ron Howard has never really done Dan’s books justice, like ever. It is time someone else gets into his shoes, or even better try to helm a slow paced pensive thrilling TV series. Now that would do him justice!

You can check out the Inferno movie trailer here:

Madaari Review (2016) | Gut-wrenching shattering drama

Madaari boldly dares into corruptive territories of the Indian Political scene. A world so chaotic and yet so powerful that nobody bats an eye or takes a stand to point fingers at those who run the nation. An everlasting pursuit of degradation that gradually gnaws at the soul of this country. A business that chugs on fuels of the diligent, whilst people rhythmically sway as per the will of the throne.

PLOT OF MADAARI (SPOILERS PRANCING AHEAD)

Irrfan Khan’s Nirmal Kumar is as he puts it – that average man who doesn’t have time to notice the negligence of the world, chiefly because he had his world in his lap. Then one day a mishap takes away the only he thing he ever cared about. That’s when he decides to take the world by the storm to rip them apart.

Still of Irrfan Khan laughing in Madaari

I will take this cheque and turn it into a dagger.

He kidnaps the son of the Home Minister of India, his wounds still fresh, to make a point and bring the whole Indian system down to its knees.

Vishesh Bansal was brilliant as Rohan Goswami. As a child actor with a loud mouth he does fairly well, and looks like he has a bright future ahead. Rajiv Gupta still doesn’t cease to bring that humorous tinge to every tale he is associated with, tickling you occasionally with his thorough expounding.

IRRFAN KHAN’S MIND-BOGGLING PERFORMANCE

Madaari is Irrfan Khan. Fueled by his impressive acting, it is a movie embellished by his passion. His nerve wrecking performance will bring tears to your eyes. His Nirmal Kumar is a character who we might have come across on the streets quite often. A blended contour of emotions that you never had a chance to meet just because you were too busy in your own world. If only you looked, if only you cared enough to notice.

His best performance lies in those devastating bits of insanity – When he is holding onto a filthy school bag and a dilapidated water bottle, sitting on the hospital floor for hours. A tearful father stopping passersby explaining his grief, whilst the world takes him for a loon. When madness seeps over him and he becomes oblivious of his own existence. When he finds his son lurking at odd instances of his imagination.

still of irrfan khan in madaari when he kidnaps Rohan

There are other gorgeous moments in the movie as well; beautiful lines that the extraordinary screenplay of Madaari housed. The voiceover of Irrfan made it all better. Poetry seeped in occasionally making dialogues even more so gorgeous letting us prey on pensive sentience. Madaari is a constant feast of beautifully written remarks that will fling you into deep musings.

WHERE MADAARI HITS LOW

By the time you reach the climax of the movie there are two alternate endings inscribed within which the stunning editing of Madaari cashes in on – The first wherein Irrfan gets shot when he takes the bus, the other when he decides to take the train instead. The fact that the former is a more palpable story and would normally occur if you decide to take such colossal measures against the government, gives it more credibility. If Madaari is inspiring, which it is, a whole lot of the trodden are already thinking of a similar way to fight Government atrocities. To that I would say don’t. That’s how you will end up. That was reality right there. That’s where the actual movie ends too.

But Nishikant Kamat had different plans for it, taking into account our unflinching attachment for happy endings. Even though he does justice to it, the movie uproots when the confessions come dropping in. Tushar Dalvi loses his placid demeanour and things start to look a little animated therefrom. But Irrfan comes to the rescue nevertheless and saves them all with his spectacular performance.

Also, Madaari’s storyline is quite similar to that of Jodie Foster’s Money Monster, which poses questions at its originality. But surprisingly Madaari was everything that Money Monster couldn’t possibly become in its valiant attempt to stand against the corrupt.

THE FINAL VERDICT

Apart from the aforementioned insignificant issues, there was nothing wrong with the movie. Editing was magnificently done. Music was superbly complementing the theme of the flick.

Irrfan stays the soul of the movie. Highly recommended! Don’t miss it for the world.

Check out the trailer of Madaari movie:

Talvar Review (2015)

Enthralling and exhilarating joyride!

India’s biggest unsolved case couldn’t get a truer justice. Talvar is simply mind-boggling. From the engaging frames of Meghna Gulzar comes a tale without a tail. An investigation that will leave you at your wit’s end. With Vishal Bhardwaj’s magnificent writing comes a piece that will let you fathom the ‘what’ and leave the ‘how’ for you to figure.

You can’t really forget the Aarushi murder case ever. Primarily because of all the media uproar it had managed to garner. It was always the talk of the town and always playing on the TV. The media were in the search of their masala (spice) and boy did they get their masala. It turned out to be a case where the conclusion was dropped first and assumed true way before the actual investigation. A perfect resonance to a typical Indian societal head! It is brilliantly reflective of the shortcomings of the Indian Police as they failed to take things seriously. It is one helluva slap to the smug face of the Indian Constitution, and would always be remembered as a black patch in the historical leaflets of crime-solving.

Irrfan Khan brings a unique vibrancy to the flick that is downright commendable. His innate acting skills prevail in the air, and bring with him the right attitude. Right from the moment the movie begins it has a natural flavor to it, something Gulzar has managed to capture perfectly. All the characters in the flick are very well portrayed and brilliantly enacted. It has a side story too to make things interesting with the protagonist, to take your head off the steam occasionally.

Names have been changed for emphasis which is quite understandable looking at the gravity of the case and the propensity for things getting blown out of context.

It leaves you with trillion questions, and a billion what ifs. If at the end of the movie you don’t come up with a conclusion in your head, and don’t find yourself gnawing hard pressing on the detective brain of yours, the job of the filmmakers would be incomplete.

That is the beauty of the movie. It leaves you baffled, wanting for more, and a proper closure. But Alas! That’s how life is. Unsolved.

Jurassic World Review (2015)

Jurassic World gives you the nostalgic jitters. Colin Trevorrow is no Spielberg. Yet he tries to nail an awesome project into the right groove. Jurassic World is a constantly entertaining, at times dramatic, thrilling joyride into the lost dino theme. We are introduced to the most dreadful, villainous and invincible creatures of all times, Indominus Rex, the hybrid that manifests multiple traits. She is relentless, aggressive, highly intelligent and untamable and she kills for sport. Things look pretty bad right there, huh! Wait till you see the other pack of dinos that Jurassic World hatches.

The story of the movie is technically quite similar to the originals however it races in as a sequel to them. The plot is a little bit predictable but Trevorrow manages to unfurl it gorgeously at the right dire moments.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

Dinosaurs are living things. They can communicate, understand each other, work as a team to topple the bad and avenge! Jurassic World runs on this very theme. It also exalts the brave, with Chris Pratt doing us the honours under the skin of Owen Grady, a relentless bad-ass who would do anything to save lives. A messed-up Claire played by Bryce Dallas Howard who thinks these animals are mere assets that don’t feel a thing, however has a change of heart at a later stage when she sympathizes with one. Two kids who are on their holiday to explore the park and a lot of tourists who are there just for fun. Irrfan Khan does a brilliant job as Masrani with his engaged acting. Vincent D’Onofrio too does a fine job with his character trying to milk opportunities. BD Wong has a short but powerful cameo and reprises his role as Dr. Henry Wu.

There are many Easter eggs in the flick that would throw you into the pits of nostalgia. Many references are made to Hammond and his mistakes, a revisit to the previous Jurassic Park place, the aviary aftermath with Pteranodons, ruthless Velociraptors, the red burning flare, the unflinching T-Rex and the deafening triumphant growl of the Rex everything simply takes you back in time.

Screenplay is well written if we concentrate only the first half of the movie. There are brilliant conversations between Masrani, Wu, Hoskins and Owen that pack in the dramatic quotient to the flick.

The movie however fails to revive the fear that all its prequels breathed on. Nobody is really afraid of dinosaurs. With Pratt doing ballsy stuff, you suddenly aren’t afraid of dinosaurs. Next thing you know even Claire goes on to summon a frigging T-Rex with a flare. We used to pee our pants with a Velociraptor around, and they are literally dancing with the dinos! Kids in the movie too don’t have much to do in the climactic scenes. Nature plays survival of the fittest once again and humans become mere spectators of destruction. In the end it boils down to teamwork and overpowering your killer instinct like valued lessons for humans which become a little indigestible.

After the attack of the Pterosaurs, the movie tries to dive into the dark from where things become a little shoddy. Editing goes a little poor there considering the classic frame cuts in the first half. Profundity in the characters of Claire and Owen loses its charm, and suddenly Owen is open for some Hoskins change. Claire’s change of heart has no gravity or a backdrop screenplay to nail the effect. There is no scientific rendezvous unlike its prequel. Also, sometimes you wish the family drama to be a bit engaging. Some flaws pop up too but apart from these little things the movie is a complete entertaining package into the past.

Watch and reminisce!

Piku Review (2015)

Piku is a well helmed flick.

Shoojit Sircar has a nick for touching the unconventional. Three years ago he had come up with a ballsy tale of sperms mashed up with a rib-tickling comedy Vicky Donor. This year he decided to stay close to the abdominal vicinity by taking up the poo project.

Piku is a comedy that scales human emotions superbly. It sways from dire sentiments to pathetic conventions that are still prevalent in the Indian society. The theme of the movie isn’t constipation alone. It takes the aforementioned in the backdrop merely for humor, and then gorgeously skims on the concept of selfless children taking care of their parents. In an altruistic world of their own, these minds are unknowingly paying back to the people who brought them to this planet. However, the question is at what cost? Juhi Chaturvedi’s story also makes you ponder sometimes how ungrateful people are and how some take the service provided to them by their children for granted.

Amitabh Bachchan bewitches us as Bashkor Banerjee with a power pack performance as a typical selfish oldie tormented by things in his head. Irrfan Khan is absolutely brilliant as a third person observant guy with a tolerant perspective. His unique natural reactions to societal ruckus keep portraying how a normal guy behaves to inadvertent villainy. Lastly let us not forget the protagonist Piku played superbly by Deepika Padukone. She looks perfectly lost in the constipation commotion and plays a neglected soul who simply cannot concentrate on her own life. She is dedicated, yet pissed, victimized and everything a woman of her age and position might actually be.

There are certain bits in the movie that jump to unfocused frames, with a lot of chatter that makes things hard to concentrate in the beginning. However, as the movie progresses things sediment down with perspective. At times, it seems to zero in as a casual road trip movie, however eventually the drama revives the tale. The flick buffs up owing to subtle one-liners, brooding remarks, humor and exceptional gravity.