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Bridget Jones’s Baby Review (2016) | Sharon Maguire Revives Jones

What a sweet movie! Bridget Jones’s Baby, a sequel that picks up crumbs that were left off in the year 2004, finds its original director Sharon Maguire back in the chair again. She literally revives what was lost in the Edge of Reason, and brings to the vanguard another “hard to beat” actor Patrick Dempsey who is hands down perfect for Jones.


A lot has happened over the years, so we are told in fleeting frames. We come to know things haven’t gone well for Bridget reprised by Renee Zellweger yet again (who else?), when there is no one to celebrate her birthday with.

image of renee zellweger as bridget jones in bridget jones's baby movie

She is in her fortys, 43 to be precise, and clueless and lonely. She has an awesome company by the way – Miranda played by Sarah Solemani who is an absolute delight. Her clumsiness will make you feel good for Jones, at least she is in right hands.

The plot unfurls with the funeral of Daniel Cleaver (Hugh Grant) where she runs into Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) once again. Leaving the awkwardness behind, she tries moving on to celebrate her single life by attending a music fest with Miranda. That’s where she meets Jack played by Patrick Dempsey for the first time. She ends up having sex with him, and then on returning with Mark, when the fire in them blazes alive out of the blue.

The real conundrum begins when Bridget Jones finds out she is pregnant, and then is unsure of whose baby it is. The fact that both try to win her over with their impressive acts frame the basis of the story-line of Bridget Jones’s Baby.


Bridget Jones went back into safe hands when Sharon Maguire decided to helm it. Her direction is better than a lot of reckless directors out there. Editing just about right to make you bide by its actual rhythm. No sudden movements or chopping off frames at odd hours. It made Bridget Jones Baby a perfect hoot.

Movie capers on the smart wits of Helen Fielding, Dan Mazer and Emma Thompson, with the latter playing the role of Dr. Rawlings. The screenplay turns out to be fine, however mostly things stay pigeonholed under humour. There is probably once or twice when Bridget Jones Baby delivers thoughtful lines. Rest stays wrapped under blankets of comedy.


Right from the moment when the movie begins you can see Renee Zellweger put on a mask. The script demands her to act that way, I understand, but unfortunately you are able to see through every bit.

Right from the moment when she picks up the phone, to discern who the caller is, to the time she waddles down to attend that funeral, there is a constant channel of deception that clouds her face and you know that’s not really her or her character either. At such moments you perceive she overacts beyond limit, as if the world is all cuddly and swishy.

still of Jack and Mark carrying Bridget Jones Baby movie by Sharon Maguire

Also, given the theme of the movie, Bridget Jones Baby forever stays in shallow waters of melodrama. It doesn’t get or let you be serious at any time. You don’t feel sorry for the characters since you know they are going to be around. It isn’t at all reflective of real life.

Apart from that Bridget Jones’s Baby works just fine. It remains smart, witty and fun almost all the time. Even with the butt jokes and all the clumsiness it stays well above the carpet of entertainment.

You can preorder Bridget Jones’s Baby here:


Bridget Jones’s Baby has surprisingly good humour and has been written with the right wits, which help it dally towards the finish line. Patrick Dempsey is an outright charmer as Jack and a very tough competition for Darcy. You will realize that when you go watch Bridget Jones Baby yourself. Go go go!

Here you can check out its trailer here:

Pete’s Dragon Review (2016) | A Beautiful Retelling of Petes Dragon 1977

Pete’s Dragon is a beautifully revived and embellished idea that had gone lost in humdrums of life. Disney digs up a lost tale, primps, preens and touches it and lo! It turns green. Green’s a pun-wink of course.


Enchanting direction! The depth of David Lowery’s direction is simply mind-boggling. His images speak of a winsome quiet, a rare calmness that allows you to feel the warmth of every scene that he tries to show. It is not rushed and retains plentiful focus. It allows you to feast on the magnificence of his settings.

He manages to whisk it beautifully with Elliott‘s, the Dragon’s puppy like demenaour. His ideas can be read through his frames, those that canter on the strides of “What would be the next possible course of action?” He does a fine blend of what is plausible and whimsical and manages to elicit a stunning feat that looks good both in imagination and theory.


Pete’s Dragon brings in the vanguard Oakes Fegley of the Fort Bliss fame, cashes in on his forever seeking eyes. He makes his character quite endearing to watch with that sad comportment he carries. We see him in that mood often throughout the movie, and the yen in his eyes to be home, the longing in his eyes as he looks up searching for Elliott, will have you feel sorry for him on numerous occasions.

still of Oakes Fegley in Petes Dragon movie

Bryce Dallas Howard’s gargantuan affairs continue as she finds herself wrapped in the totem of another reptilian movie right after she did Jurassic World last year. She plays Grace, the lady who tries to help the lost boy in the woods. Her’s is quite a relatable character something you would love to do any day – care for a child who has no whereabouts of his family or, for that to matter, life itself.

Karl Urban as Gavin brings home that nefarious element to the Dragon tale, claiming his pointless right over what he finds and captures. His is a comprehensible role, that you can put a pin to, and get along with, given the circumstances.

Wes Bentley could be found so much engaged in his acting, that you don’t find him doing much in the movie. Robert Redford as Meacham has Dragon glories to share, and his thoughtful comportment will have you listening to him just as kids listened to him in rapt attention. Oona Laurence plays Natalie quite convincingly too, and supports Pete right from the moment she finds him.


still of Elliott and Pete in Petes Dragon movie

Last but not the least: The Dragon Elliott. If you have a thing for dogs, you are going to fall for it instantly. Elliot’s acts are just like a dog’s, with its postural manners, playful acts, seeking eyes; everything is going to put it into a contour of an adorable puppy. Its disappearing act comes straight from the 1977 movie, which Disney decided to go with. There are sporadic moments of tranquility when the green dragon flies to show nature at its true flair to Pete. Those images leave you with a sense of contentment. Love Elliott has is unconditional. But it becomes ungainly thoughtful too.


If you are in the right rhythm of the movie, there are some instances there that you cannot certainly miss. Like the time Pete ends up in town only to storm away in his rare window of opportunity. You can read him well in those fleeting instances where he is cornered by a pacifying Grace, as he howls, nay, wails in pain. That yelp is meant for Elliott but gets lost in thin air. It is so impactful that it will definitely hurl you towards a whirlwind of sympathy for the poor child.

I loved the direction where the falling of Pete with a thud gets followed up brilliantly by the waking up of the Dragon. You can almost feel their connection. Also, the way the movie begins, with that abysmal tragedy that has been so beautifully shown through Pete’s perspective inside the car. The book that Pete carries “Elliott Gets Lost” literally defines his life, and stays at all times, well complemented by the surreal creature.

The fact that the dragon sneezes a bucketful of mucus instead of fire brings home that elemental twist of humour that is laughable. But he is a dragon after all, and he can only take so much. That monstrous mien in the end is aptly fit and only once, just when things begin to head south. However, Disney doesn’t fail to celebrate Elliott with all the goodies, finding its soul to forgive it in a split second.


This is where the movie truly scores as well. Not only is the score simply soothing to the ears, but it constantly puts you in a room full of jocularity. It has beautiful songs well edited. Lowery places them in right areas that accentuate the theme of Petes Dragon further. One of the most gorgeous songs that the movie retains is the Petes Dragon Song by Bonnie Prince Billy the lyrics of which you can find here: Lyrics of Dragon Song. It will make you fall for it at once. So soothing and artfully written.


If you pay attention to the CGI of the movie, it fails to touch the levels of culmination you might have had in your head, given today’s heightened age of visual effects. Elliott appears to be more fantastical and imaginary. It doesn’t have that primal realism feel to look at, like all those successful reptilian movies in the past that had so beautifully triumphed in visuals.

still of Elliott from Petes Dragon movie

You can’t also oversee the fact 6 years in the wild, and the child still behaves in normalcy. When he finds a group of people coming, he doesn’t run away in sheer fear, also puts things under clouds of doubt. His reaction on finding new things for the first time in town doesn’t get milked enough. He comes straight from the savage world. But still doesn’t carry that bewilderment gaze whilst running and hopping over things he had forgotten all about. Things like that don’t go overlooked when perceived from a pragmatic vantage.

Screenplay of Pete’s Dragon goes to and fro. At times drops us brilliant lines, then most of the times lets its characters speak from their eyes.


Another downside stays with the plot of Pete’s Dragon. It is something you have been constantly fed when a misunderstood beast story is considered. So you see every bit coming. Pete’s Tale is a clichéd story likes of which we had already seen in the form of The Good Dinosaur that Pixar did last year.

But you can’t shake off its backdrop either. It is very plausible which makes it an interesting fiction. It is quite remarkable how every open end in its story gets conjoined.


Pete’s Dragon is a spectacular retelling of the tale that saw the light for the first time in 1977. It doesn’t go dark being a Disney movie, but subtly skips through that part (in the beginning). Petes Dragon incessantly capers around the happy theme that it intends to walk on. Of course, Lowery’s direction makes it all the way better.

If you don’t delve into the clichéd side of it, you are going to love every bit of it. If you are a kid, there is nothing in the world you would want than being bestowed upon a friendly dragon for a pup.

Petes Dragon carries a stunning amiable tone that is outright perfect for your kid. It goes without saying, it is great for the fanciful whims that lurk inside you. A highly recommended movie for everybody.

Check out the trailer of Pete’s Dragon here:

Room Review (2015)

Adorable, powerful and literally captivating!

Room is a dive into the head of a child’s perspective, who witnesses the world for the first time. Emma Donoghue comes with a tale that is so beautifully wrapped under the outlook of Jack who believes space is confined. It is in a way reflective of how we have been living in today’s world, and how possibilities gawk at us from a distance, and we are never prepared to challenge ourselves into stepping out.

Ma: You’re gonna love it.

Jack: What?

Ma: The world.

The plot of Room unfurls like a beautiful flower. You are thrown into the mundane sphere of daily chores, and then suddenly you are told what’s happening and what seems to be the disconnect. It is hurled at you at once, amidst the regularity and it is hard to handle just like Jack’s head refuses to accept it. But then again that is the truth. Jack, the smart kid he is, accepts it and tries to help his Ma out, whilst challenging himself to a bizarre world that he has never encountered before.

What are quite thoughtful are Jack’s diegetic thoughts which go in the background often telling you how he feels about the world. They put your insight in the garbage. Seeing the beauty of the world through a learning phase is indeed really soothing. That’s where the screenplay goes really brilliant. His words are so powerful and yet so innocent that he will compel you to go broody.

Jacob Tremblay is exceptional as Jack who turns five and knows everything. Brie Larson plays an outstanding Ma, and fiddles with the right emotions. So is Joan Allen as Nancy, Jack’s grandma who epitomes sanity and tries to put sense and normalcy in the inane.


Film’s most touching moment is when Jack reunites with his mother and the music bashes your nerves to dust. It makes you happy and sad at the same time. But that’s only the half of it. The rest of the movie progresses with how he tries to gel up with the asynchronous. Lenny attempts to manifest how Jack sees his surrounding through his sheepish eyes once he is out in the open. You can almost feel yourself feeling sorry for Jack and Ma. It would make you want to hug him right up and teach him the ways of the world.

Room concludes at an arresting juncture where Jack wishes to see the room he used to live in. He finds it smaller now that he has seen more of the world, and bids every object he used to adore so much in that room farewell, as his ultimate closure. It is really so pensive that you can’t shake it off. It was like he was in a womb till he aged five.

If you are a drama freak, you can’t simply miss this one. Brilliantly thought of and well written. Thank you Emma!

This is yet another mind-boggling movie by Lenny Abrahamson who brought us Frank an year ago. You can find the review of Frank here: Frank Review