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The LEGO Ninjago Movie Review (2017) | Ninjas Assemble!

Just when you were about to feel there’s no such thing as too many LEGO movies, The LEGO Ninjago movie walks in tall to prove you wrong. It does so with its weird plot rambling. Humour is great, makes you laugh all the time. Doesn’t have to struggle with that part at least. But the story-line of the flick is just sauntering pointlessly and you could feel it in your bones when the movie becomes a sheer exercise in lethargy.

It is long and tedious, with its plot being one of those cliched stories we have seen a dozen times over. It blends different kinds of flicks making spoofs out of them. However, the good thing about it is that the movie is almost intelligently crafted. With elements from real-time, for instance, a cat (Meowthra) making its way into the storyline effortlessly is probably a genius thing to think of about a LEGO city that’s built in a room, of course. That’s where the strength of the movie lies. Also, the animation is done brilliantly. For that, my heart just goes out to all those people who meticulously helped it to reach fruition.

Garmadon

The most cherishable thing about The LEGO Ninjago movie is a character called Garmadon. Voiced by Justin Theroux his perfect comic timing will make you guffaw loudly. It’s created and performed brilliantly. His carefree reckless attitude is the best.

I must have butt-dialed you.

Garmadon The LEGO Ninjago Movie

He plays the father to our protagonist Lloyd voiced by Dave Franco. Lloyd is shunned at his school since his dad is a supervillain. But the twist is that it is none other than Lloyd who is the Green Ninja who secretly fights and tries to stop his father from destroying their city Ninjago.

The way the twist is shown doesn’t feel like a twist, actually confuses people till they get it.

Lloyd: You ruined my life!

Garmadon: That’s not true! I haven’t even been a part of your life, how could I ruin it? I wasn’t even there.

Editing of The LEGO Ninjago Movie (Spoilers)

The story of The LEGO runs for too long pointlessly. That’s where the editing becomes questionable. It stretches too much with a neverending plot which seems to go nowhere with Garmadon the villain often bouncing to and fro, becoming the good and the bad guy himself. Then eventually we find out that the villain isn’t him but a cat. So that was a bummer! But from the vantage of the LEGO creatures, it all seems legit.

We could have removed many things, to be honest, and made the movie short and sweet. The time we see the second big assault happen and we find the Ninjago team getting badly ripped, till that point of time, The LEGO Ninjago Movie feels absolutely great. But then Master Wu (Jackie Chan) jumps in and the training begins which feels like a dispensable spread.

To make matters worse Garmadon, the badass villain he was, takes the journey alongside his enemies, helping each other out getting in on that estranged father-son bond.

Lloyd: On scale of one to ten, how bad is it?

Garmadon: Oh, I’d say it’s about a seven….point…..arm ripped off.

Most of the parts are too stupid to believe, that’s what forces you to stop taking any of it seriously. The secret Ninja force feels really useless, to be honest, with Zane being pointlessly robotic. I think he was chosen to be a robot for just one punch line.

The Mom is a Superhero too!

While some might have found it cool, I found it absurd. As if things weren’t gaudy already. Mom (Koko) voiced by Olivia Munn was a superhero and a role model of Nya. Another one of those dispensable sub-plots that were deliberately trying to make the movie something it wasn’t in the first place.

He was so ambitious. He said he wanted to conquer the world. I thought it was a figure of speech.

Owing to that the movie runs for an absurd amount of time. Such subplots are brimming aplenty and that’s what gnaws at the tale. Although it is understandable that they ultimately complement the story, and hence were chosen.

You can order the movie from here:

The Prologue and Epilogue Real-Time Angle

Another part that might have miffed a lot of people could be that dispensable prologue and epilogue part where real-time characters of Mr. Liu (Jackie Chan) and a child show up. Even though it feels like that imagining a story feels better that way, you could tell it was deliberately punched in to justify the cat angle. It was Mr. Liu’s contempt for his cat that ended up turning it into a villain.

Even though the usage might have slightly helped with the plot, you could feel an evident need to remove it, being an animated movie completely. The story in a story bit, we could have done without. Some things should be left to viewer’s imagination.

There is nothing out of the box about the story and it goes on inexplicably into a territory a subtle writer could have easily avoided. But the clever things remain limited to the cat and….okay that’s it.

The Lego Ninjago Movie Gang

Master Wu’s face always seems like it is smiling, an apparent artistry error. It becomes hard for you to concentrate on the serious things he says with a smiley face. I had a hard time listening to him and then slapping that face on him just made it worse.

The Final Verdict

The LEGO Ninjago movie is fun, no doubt. But there are so many issues with the movie that makes it less of a movie, more of a childish fancy, very similar to the stories we used to make, playing with our LEGOs. That being said, it is almost intelligent. But what stops it from becoming outright ravishing is its stretchy plot, and its numerous issues.

Au contraire, what makes it really worth watching is the one and only hilarious character – Garmadon.

Miss The LEGO Batman Movie? Read its review.

Check out the trailer of The Lego Ninjago Movie here:

The Girl on the Train Movie Review (2016) | A Whodunit Thriller That Leaves you Guessing

The Girl on the Train is a whodunit mystery. Tate Taylor tries to keep the real murderer well under the wraps at all times in the girl on the train movie, trying to do ample justice to Paula Hawkins’s novel of the same name. However, in an attempt to cover up, and tie everything down to the story’s culminating point, he seems to be unknowingly rushing towards the ending. That leaves Tate Taylor’s work a tad impoverished for its grim theme. Characters of the movie don’t get a proper focus, and you kind of hate every one. Nevertheless, when you focus on its fine plot you realize that Paula Hawkins had weaved one hell of a tale, and for that you cannot praise her enough.

Characters in The Girl on the Train Movie

The Girl on the Train movie commences with a slow jerk, with overwhelming thoughts of Rachel portrayed brilliantly by Emily Blunt. I am pretty sure it would have sounded a bit different if the screenplay had zoomed in on her broody thoughts more than focusing on just the materialism. Her yearning to live someone else’s life, her vantage that sees a stranger’s rewarding world and tries to compare it with hers, her perceptive theories that try to write stories on already written pages, and her constant yammering and reasoning with herself in search for a direction were all literally shouting for better subtle and artful frames. Unfortunately Tate didn’t realize that.

still of emily blunt as Rachel in the girl on the train movie

We move on just like that speeding train without getting a hang of her emotional trauma. Then we see Tate introducing us to the second most crucial character, Megan portrayed by Haley Bennett. She is a perfect fit with a constant gloom that looms over her. She tries to display all phases of her life, the past, the present and an impending horrible future in her countenance. Her comportment is that of an intense indifference that lurks somewhere in the hollows of her eyes.

Other Characters

Anna played by Rebecca Ferguson on the other hand gets the least amount of focus. You don’t see her unfurling that well. Tom’s character portrayed by Justin Theroux seems most of the time absent. Edgar Ramirez creates Dr. Kamal Abdic as Megan’s shrink, and is a guy who basically listens to her, and given his profession, understands her troubling woes more than anyone else. Scott played by Luke Evans is simply a guy who ends up being cheated upon, and later lied to by Rachel. He doesn’t get a proper screen time. With such cameo kind of roles you feel like, it is the director and not the story that is basically trying to steer you towards the enigma.

The Inebriated Plot (Spoilers Ahead)

Rachel is an alcoholic, and she drinks so much that she has become amnesic. So much that she is in a constant wont of blacking out every day. It is then others who fill her in about her acts. That’s like a curse per se. She has been divorced by her husband, who has married Anna now and has a baby with her. Glimpses from the past haunt her, and it is hard for her to move on.

still of haley bennett as megan in the girl in the train movie

Megan is a gorgeous lady with a troubled past. She babysits Anna and Tom’s child, and lives a few blocks away from their house. But her backstory will bring tears to your eyes. I just wished her dismay to be captured better than what Tate showed us. She lives with Scott, the guy with the perfect body, but unfortunately she has been cheating on him.

In a series of fuming events, Megan disappears and nobody seems to know where she is. Rachel who had unknowingly bonded with her, (a one way) by simply staring at her life through the panes of a train ends up blacking out on the very night of her disappearance. And sadly she was the only one who could have guessed the culprit.

The movie is then her attempt to figure out who the real murderer is, and she doesn’t rule herself out as well.

You can pre-order the movie The Girl on the Train here:

Other Issues

The thing with crime drama is that it mostly revolves around characters. And each one demands irrefutable attention. But there is so little to the character development here that makes you hate each and every one of them. There is nothing relatable served to you, and that’s where the disconnect lies.

The timing of this movie is also one of those issues. It was released alongside Inferno, another movie that had belied memories to blame for, almost a same amnesic plot build up. The similarity is very uncanny.

still of Rebecca Ferguson as Anna the girl on the train movie

Another vexing fact is that Tate Taylor tries to confuse the viewers even more by showing glimpses from the past in constant running frames. Even though it’s a ballsy attempt at subtlety, trying to dislodge the timeline into dissonance, it sometimes becomes too much. As if trying to figure out what’s happening wasn’t enough!

The Final Verdict

A movie like The Girl on the Train needs a profound calm. Something that lets you think alongside the protagonist, or may be relate to her character, by understanding her.  Sadly that’s profusely missing. However, the movie still remains a very intriguing crime story that will leave you wanting to know what’s coming at every juncture.

Bottom-line is, The Girl on the Train movie could have become so much great, but it ends up becoming a mere adequacy instead.

Check out the trailer of The Girl on the Train movie here: