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Jason Bourne Review (2016) | Despite Minor Flaws Bourne Shines Through

Jason Bourne is back! The ever so popular duo Matt Damon and Paul Greengrass; they are at it again. They go full blown trying to recreate that obscured Robert Ludlum magic that we are all diehard fans of.

The theme we have here though is strangely similar to all the prequels. Unnecessary as it seemed to bring Bourne from the ashes, we end up having something banal as the plot nevertheless. But it still hatches gold in terms of action, technology and that outstanding Bourne foresight.


I just love the direction of Paul Greengrass. His shaky camera technique always stands out. It fills his frames with rare gravitas, and compels the audience to pay heed. We see every bit of his extraordinary panache rolling on the big screen as we feast on the subtle grandeur of a constant commotion.


There are numerous memorable moments that we take away from this Jason Bourne film.

The first one being the riot backdrop, the anti-government protest which cleverly shows the fight is constant and real. CIA carries out its covert operations unperturbed even in such ruckus. Hats off to that!

The rendezvous with Nicky Parsons played by Julia Stiles in a theatrical set of nerve-racking set of events will have you salute Jason Bourne for who he is. Watch out Vincent Cassel rampage in with his unpredictability. A perfect casting there! Well chosen!

still of Vincent Cassel as Asset in Jason Bourne movie

Another high note of Jason Bourne film worth jotting down is when Vincent takes the SWAT truck and decimates countless cars as he tries to escape Bourne fury. A thrilling scene that will have a go at your adrenaline. Breathtaking! That entire car chase scene was enchanting as well and superbly shot.

When you pay attention to the CIA hunting, you will be blown away beyond limit by noticing their jaw-dropping nimbleness to handle situations. Also, the technology they use! Ah! Simply amazeballs!

When the competition goes tough and effortlessly enters the nail-biting zone, that’s when Bourne flourishes the most. Watching him outsmart the smart is what makes every Bourne movie a thrilling joyride. It all gets justified here as well. Aren’t all the Bourne movies formed under that same niche?


still of Tommy Lee Jones as Robert Dewey and Riz Ahmed as Aaron Kalloor in Jason Bourne

Another part worth noticing is how the government wishes to have their eyes on everything. As Robert Dewey portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones threatens Aaron Kalloor, a real life like character (CEO of a leading social media enterprise Deep Dream) played brilliantly by Riz Ahmed to work against the ethos he wishes to run his company on, you will be forced to wonder how the future of privacy really looks. Privacy is a myth and so the CIA proves by putting its nose in other’s business.

Alicia Vikander is one of the most exciting, and as the movie progresses we find out, seemingly powerful characters to have ever entered the Bourne franchise. She wears Heather Lee on her sleeves for the better part of the movie only to drop a bomb on us in the end. The way she gets on top of things with her technical skills is what makes her a girl to watch out for in the long run.


The fact that Paul Greengrass tried to weave a plot that seemed kind of forced to blow Bourne out in the open isn’t the only downside the movie had. Even though every fact falls in place, and there is a constant pace justifying each and everything as to why a bit is shown, there are other things nay flaws that silently gnaw at the soul of the flick.

The first one being the shoddy screenplay of Jason Borne. There isn’t an eye-opening line by Paul Greengrass or Christopher Rouse inscribed in it unlike the prequels, that impoverish the quality of the written material.

still of Matt Damon as Jason Bourne fighting odd fights in Reykjavik

Bourne’s character still ends up being very manipulative on account of shattered memories in his head. The part where Dewey chooses to trust his mouth more than a gun against Jason Bourne will compel you to wonder how easy it is to dupe Bourne – with words from his past.

Then there are dispensable characters that don’t squeeze out melodrama at all. Like that Nicky Parsons fate, you don’t see Bourne feel sorry enough for. We had a past with Nicky. He had too. The movie had snappy casualties that were like dominoes that stood unattended.

There is a smothering fight scene as we reach the end of Jason Bourne for a climactic closure. Unfortunately with the previous levels of agent brawls, this one falls a little vapid owing to the zoomed in camera that makes it hard to concentrate. The fight, even though more plausible, ends up becoming a mere ‘meh’ owing to the way it ends, with a lot of choking.

The Jason Bourne movie DVD is out. You can get it here:


Overall I think the movie was fine. An unneeded sequel since the Bourne story was already told in three extraordinary bits before. But being an aficionado I wouldn’t ever mind watching Bourne kick Government’s ass every now and then just to break free through that mundane ripple.

still of Alicia Vikander and Matt Damon in Jason Bourne

The best part eventually indubitably and inevitably remains, when Bourne does something badass and the music of Moby goes literally Extreme Ways.

With the return of Matt Damon and Paul Greengrass, the future of the Bourne films look strong. But at one point you begin to wonder what will happen to the Bourne books ?

Check out the trailer of Jason Bourne movie here:


The Martian Review (2015)

The Martian is an orgasmic dig into science, unknown territories, top-notch optimism and undying hope.

As the beginning frames of The Martian survival painted the screen with a silent promise of grandeur, the first quotient that riveted me instantly was ‘Hope’. Mark Watney’s undying attitude towards life was really something. His optimistic nature towards survival was commendable. So what adds further icing to this survival tale? Sheer Watney genius!

The Martian is everything a survival movie needs to be. Ridley already had Andy Weir’s brilliant story in his vanguard, and he takes it and moulds it into one helluva beauty. The end result: 141 minutes of awesomeness. It keeps your heart in your mouth, your head attentive so you don’t miss all the useful science jargon, a smile on your face with its great humour whilst keeping you engaged throughout.


Matt Damon is outstanding as Watney. At times it’s like you can almost read his thoughts. He lingers his expressions like an expert and makes you connect instantly. Like one time he talks about his eventuality with a “so, Yeah……Yeah”. His instincts help him tackle every setback. His genius complements his acts. A very practical man, who takes every possibility into account but doesn’t let reality cloud his judgment. This makes you think what if the Martian wasn’t a polymath? Instead a normal human being like us? What would have happened then? Wouldn’t we have, I don’t know, died within a fortnight?

Visuals are rad. The scenic landscapes of Mars and Earth have been framed beautifully. At times the debris in the movie makes its 3D look badass. The screenplay is apt, most of the times shoehorned with Science. The plot is like a tide that makes you rove with its ups and downs. The brilliant brains manifested in the story are quite exceptional too. The flick teaches us a lot of things. The primal one being: never lose hope!

At the same time, Martian makes you feel like a layman. Had you studied properly in school, you would know every little bit they were throwing out there. If you already know something, it would still make you feel you aren’t nerd enough.

I got this sudden urge to build something when I walked out of the theatre. Guess this flick does that to you. 😉

Interstellar Review (2014)

Not long ago, I watched a featurette with excerpts from the movie Interstellar, which showed the gargantuan amount of work and sweat Nolan brethren, Kip Thorne and others put in whilst exploring the behaviour of a black hole. The crisp attention and the minute details they did not overlook flabbergasted me beyond limit. So hopeful was written all over my head. And Nolan never disappoints.


Strewn with science, this movie not only takes you on a joy ride, it educates you as well. The concept of space-time singularity pervades throughout the flick as we witness a superb simulation of a black hole, and it doesn’t stop at just that. We go into it. Yes, through the eyes of our protagonist for the first time, we witness a distinct theoretical world that has found pragmatism. An impeccable representation of Tesseract with threads of time.

The best thing about Nolan is the enormity of the project he takes. The script is so beautifully written that it rivets you right from the start. The concept is like magic, a miracle happening in a distant galaxy. As the story unfolds it makes you feel as if you are getting closer to finding answers to our existence finally. The plot however has something else in store for you. And it is a big fat blunt satire on our loneliness. We are alone and all we have is each other. That is the penultimate truth.

Wormhole was never explored like this before. How time plays tricks on you, powerful representation of anomalies, the wickedness of human mind when left alone in despair(that Damon bit), how the music of nature (the rain, the thunder and the cricket chirping noise) makes you feel home, the conundrum of our purpose, the humour of TARS, the physics that touches almost every part in the flick, the poetry of the brave and wise through Dylan Thomas’s words, superb lamenting conversations, and the brain-wrecking revelations in the end – every little detail has been exemplified with proper logical explanations and shown on a platter of sensations.

Emotional surge is strong, and with a power pack performance by McConnaughey everything uplifts. Bits of a father-daughter melodrama are the most feeling kind. Shatters you from the inside, as you empathize with the protagonist’s tears. Zimmer touches your heart with his profound score. Notes are so brilliant that they put you right into the flick. This too would sit amongst Zimmer’s best works.

It is one of the most ambitious projects that would be remembered in impending debates for the intricacies it touches and the science it explores. Nolan is certainly one of a kind director, a great gift to mankind, a wise man who wouldn’t go gentle into that good night. Kudos to yet another mammoth achievement!