Straight From a Movie

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Cinema: The brush that paints our roads

Cinema is hands down the biggest influence on us. That colossal screen that homes in wonder has been toying with our lives ever since we were kids. Something created merely to keep us in line, keep us from drifting away. Every thought, every action of ours, drenched with a heroic mindset, as if we were the protagonists of our own story. If we didn’t feel love, we felt it because the big bad-ass screen told us to. If we didn’t know what to do, the talking wall taught us what to pick. If we didn’t know where to go, the story in the wall pointed us towards. Our lives smeared by its boisterous presence. It is like a religion that keeps us in check inadvertently.

No one on this wretched planet of ours has a clue about one’s destiny. No one knows what needs to be done. What is life’s ultimate goal apart from crumbling down to nothingness? Who told us to build? Who told us to live? Who told us to do anything? What if I decide to slay a day by doing nothing? Would it change anything? Who is to judge? Who is to say that I wasted it? But you never told us what to do! How can it be called futile? If living is the only thing that matters, didn’t I just live?

But that gigantic thingy guides you to the right grooves. Pushes you into professions and things that you didn’t have a clue about. Suddenly the clueless you, jumps off your seat to pursue a life that the screen aggrandized. Out of the blue you have a purpose. And lo! You are caught in a wretched pointless living cycle once again, following a thing you do not know, that sieved its way into your head all because a screen, that must be true and a story that you could relate to, fed you.

Cinema has the power to project the living in a flamboyant way. It has the power to exalt the trodden too. It can depict future, can let you live the past, can focus on the uplifted, or make you empathize with the destitute. It could be a mere projection of one’s imagination, of the societal happenings, of fantasies from a child’s head, of the dark life, of the heroic of the norm, of fears unexplored, of places unattended, of the truth, of the lies or could be a product of someone’s big plan to keep us engaged, keep us from thinking the unthinkable, to keep us brooding, to keep our brains in check with lives of others, so that we forget ours!

Movies: Taking us away from the mundane since 1895

Aren’t you tired of the mundane? Doesn’t it bother you to find yourself surrounded by things that are powerless and futile? Following same old jaded acts makes everything seem pointless and trivial. Aren’t you dying for a miracle? Don’t you want something ‘different’ to happen? Something unworldly, unearthly, that shatters conventions and uproots beliefs? Whose occurrence causes nothing to fall in place? Something that exerts your life to action, that pushes you to the edge, that keeps the adrenaline pumping in you and takes away the ‘ordinary’ from your life.

Lucky for us, we have movies to bring that change. The exquisite stuffing to fill our hollow lives. Some take us to fits of fantasy, the incessant joyride into the unknown, a realm where we wish to live forever, a world that promises a better life, better than ours.

Many of these let us live a protagonist’s life. We turn heroes all of a sudden. We connect with the person who does right. We support the do-gooder silently. Then there is a plot that lets us marvel the character’s amazing life. We instantly become projected personas. We get under their skins and live! Only for hours but we do.

The right kind of drama connects our soul. Feels as if our stories are on display. We empathize with every tear that finds no cheek. We understand the pain. We fathom their predicament. We feel the love and feel our soul heave up with rapture. We smile and frown and drown ourselves in projected stories that are sometimes untrue. Fiction dreamt by heads. Yet we live. Live for those fleeting hours. Witness someone else’s life mould and carve magic right in front of our eyes.

The moment the end credits show up, lights take us back to stark reality. The same old inconsequential life that speaks of jaded reappears like an old tattered page. Pages of dust they are. Pages that are hard to read.

I can’t imagine a life without movies. They give us a way to lead a thousand lives. Nothing can put it better than Ron:

Straight From A movie Ron

Man, I got life right? Mine. But fuck I want somebody else’s sometimes.

Watching a movie is a great way to let off the steam. It lets you visit a different world for a while. Away from your own misery. Away from the pathetic grief of life. It packs your void with impactful potent frames that defy the ordinary. It is life’s ultimate ‘release’!


The Pensieve: Lock up your memories

Movies are impactful. They leave marks and smears in our heads with their fantastical concepts and thought provoking ideas. But many movies are based on books. This takes us back to the origin, a place where a brilliant head conceived a particular notion out of mere thin air. Yes, the writers who were hit in the head with the out of the box rockets. So talented humans are! So talented! One such exceptional bit from a franchise we all loved beyond limit got impregnated in the head of Rowling. The Pensieve was one of the most badass ideas one could have ever imagined. Whilst there are myriad variants of this fictional inanimate beauty, Rowling’s invention still beats the craziest of all ideas.

Not only does it let you take out and store your memory but it also lets you revisit it like reality. You can have a third person vantage too, and experience someone else’s memory in a first class comfy seat. Just imagine the things you could do were this idea to breathe in reality! Jury would be dispensable as judges would have a blast giving judgments. You would be able to relive a joyful moment of your life thousand times. You can shun the worst ones, lock ‘em up and focus only on the good ones. Ah! Sheer bliss!

Straight from a movie Dumbledore

The memory cabinet was something we have always dreamt of. I have more than often found myself circling on the thought of storing my memories at one place, like a hard drive, to retrieve the crucial ones only when required. As a kid I used to ponder: Are we ever going to run out despite our storage space being so vast?

With the advent of a memory bowl like Pensieve in our lives, we would turn into better versions of ourselves. Wouldn’t that clear our heads for good? Wouldn’t that make us ballsier? I think we would be more focused, unleashed from chains of past, unaffected by fear of any kind, bold, brazen, zealous and more committed to every job at hand.

But Alas! It is chained to glimmers of fantasy and unfortunately we can’t have a shot at it. Can we hammer this beauty alive? Only in dreams, I surmise.

Straight from a movie Memory

Unbroken Review (2014) | A Survival tale | A slow paced shoddy drama

Unbroken breaks into mediocrity.

What separates a great movie from a good one? Direction? Well, then Angelina Jolie misses it by an inch. Albeit, she might reach it someday given the experience she is gradually garnering under her directorial hat. However sadly she isn’t still there. Yes , Unbroken isn’t really that great.


The biopic we have is a survivor’s tale of Louis Zamperini embodied by Jack O’ Connell. He isn’t a hero exactly, rather someone who has endured ugly guts of war.

The drama of Unbroken reeks of war perversion. But at some point it makes you compare it with the likes of ‘The Last Castle’. Jack isn’t Redford however he still gives his best. Miyavi is not exactly James Gandolfini as Mutsushiro Watanabe and misses facial expressions by light years.


Things that were outrageous were: Louis’s stint as an athlete, a bland story that picked pace without any powerful interest or focus. The story itself did not throw light on any of his heroics except at one point where Louis’ decision reflects simply doing the right thing. It misses the point of the movie to show the athlete who inadvertently got lost into war owing to an unfortunate event. The script demanded quality thought spent into the melodrama it should have retained. Unfortunately it failed to reach those heights.

still of C.J. Valleroy as Young Louie in Unbroken

I’m nothing. Just let me be nothing.


Some of the best bits of the movie were placed right at the ingress. Like the fight sequences that were portrayed happening beautifully around a tenacious bomber and was manifested through different vantage points via aircrew’s eyes.

Zamperini’s pining for survival in an ocean of sharks marred by devastating hunger (watch out for that albatross bit), punishing tides, hopeful rain, and the dark life that followed therefrom were also beautifully shown.

still from unbroken lost men in the sea

Jolie tries to venture into subtlety by showing the filth of war: trodden books, corpses, loss and grief, however fails to portray the exact image of her emotions. Her insipid presentation takes away the gist she wished to capture.


The plot just loses focus owing to the slow pace it carries throughout without a lucid screenplay to hold the viewers riveted. Even though the Coen brothers came up with the flick’s screenplay Unbroken hardly retains all the dramatic substance that matters.

The editing too is very pathetic. Her style of film-making is good for dramas, yet what Jolie still needs to find is a really good script that is accentuated further by a gorgeous screenplay.

There are some movies that make you pity its ill-fated actor, make you empathize with the protagonist, feel the pain. I was surprised to find out that nothing in this flick made me feel Zamperini’s pain. This again shoots a dozen questions at the direction.

Average alert. Watch Unbroken movie only if you have a lot of time to kill.

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Review (2014) | Epic closure

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is the epic finale to one of the most engaging tales ever.


Peter Jackson returns with his HFR to closely project every daunting intricacies of our beloved franchise “The Hobbit” and he does it with pizzazz. Be it be the dragon’s fury on the ill-fated Lake-town, the impeccable depiction of shadows of Dol Guldur, the epic war formations of Elfin and dwarves-army or the breathtaking fight sequences that followed. Every bit drenched with beauty only Peter Jackson could perfect, and he makes it look complete badass!


The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies begins where it had left off: with dragon’s wrath. Albeit we knew that the slaying of the beast was imminent, the flick takes pace aptly with the Tolkein’s tale. We see Bard who wishes a genuine share for his people from the mountain treasure in order to help them rise from ashes. Thranduil is stained with greed and comes with his elfin hoard to rob the mountain for silver and white gems. Thorin holds the fort succumbed by dragon sickness unwilling to budge.

Dain, Thorin’s cousin, comes to the aid of Thorin to fight his battle. Above it all there is the mighty Orc army led by Azog and another gigantic Orc army that swarm with war bats. The lonely mountain of treasure witnesses it all – the tragedy called war.


Screenplay of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies being limited owing to war depictions, we are still left with pretty amazing conversations like the one between the Bard and Thorin through a crevice in the wall. Bard’s painful urge to Thorin to keep his promise. The aftermath of Kili’s fate with Tauriel in sobs:

still of a crying tauriel in the hobbit: the battle of the five armies

“If this is love, I don’t want it.”


Without exploring gore, Jackson presents death superbly with the magic he weaves through his frames.

Thorin’s inane reasoning with Dwalin, voices in his head, his dream and finally his rad resurrection from the Dragon Sickness have been beautifully portrayed. The fate of Kili and Fili sealed by Azog’s perversion meets Thorin’s wrath. Their clash powerful! Even more engaging was the fight between Legolas and Bolg.

The story eventually meets where LOTR begins and connecting the stream like that with Baggins and Gandalf in the picture only brings a contented smile.

Want a closure? Plunge in!