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Tag: Sacha Baron Cohen

The Brothers Grimsby Review (2016) | Passable Comedy One Time Watch

The Brothers Grimsby has laughable moments, no doubt, that you might end up discussing for being either too inappropriate or for the brazen fun of it, but that’s about it. The movie carries a banal plot to support its comedy on, and things kind of fall as it fails to retain anything tangible to put its feet on. It’s like they say:

“Leave your brains home and go watch this and you might actually enjoy it.”


Sacha Baron Cohen never fails to tickle you by bringing in forefront his natural knack for humour. To throw you into pits of laughter he also carries disgusting items in his baggage as elements of last resort. We are already aware of that. The Brothers Grimsby stays no stranger to his clumsy acts; herein he creates Nobby  yet another Sacha’s infamous character who will test your mirth-patience and have a go at your ribs. Creating a rib-tickling persona that is outright hard to predict.

He uses stark bawdy stuff, which he is known for, one by one to pack in hilarity that will throw you at times into stomach-churning laughter, and yet what’s seen can’t be unseen. Ye been warned!

But you were already in for it when you had decided to watch a Sacha Baron Cohen comedy movie. So, it shouldn’t surprise you at all if you were to see something off-putting cheesy dangling in front of you. Bottom-line: “You get what you ask for.”

That Elephant scene is hands down, one of the funniest bits from the movie. Beware! It might affect you on a psychological level. 😛

still of that elephant scene in the brothers grimsby


The Brothers Grimsby tries to cash in on its unusual story that tries to reveal its crux towards the end, but by the time we reach there, nobody cares about the story anymore. It becomes a hotch-potch of passable frames. At one point, the movie tries to amble on that famous first person fighting perspective made famous by Hardcore Henry,  which works for it a while as far as action sequences were concerned. But given the theme of the movie, it ends up becoming quite unnecessary.

It is good that The Brothers Grimsby not for a second leaves its brotherly love theme that it was based upon. It hasn’t been milked enough and yes there’s a constant disconnect that doesn’t hold the story tighter, but you can still manage to concentrate at the humorous bits that tacked along.


Both the editing and direction of the movie are equally shoddy. Frames tear up at weird junctures. You can’t take anything seriously not even the somberness that Louis Leterrier tries to put occasionally. It is like even at the end of it, you really don’t care if things steered or not towards a happy ending. Because everything is surreal, obnoxious and scattered in bits.

On the brighter side, The Brothers Grimsby is only good if you want something really light to gorge upon and wish to concentrate on your popcorn more. That’s it. Laugh it off!

Check out the trailer of The Brothers Grimsby here:

Alice Through the Looking Glass Review (2016)

Surprisingly good!

If Lewis Carroll would have been alive today he would have given a nod to Alice Through the Looking Glass. Of course not for the reason that they totally changed his book and messed with every single detail to weave something different altogether, but for the mere fact that it is brimming up with an equal fanciful inclination and zeal that Carroll shared.


Alice Through the Looking Glass personifies ‘Time’ which is both poetic and enigmatic as Alice embarks on a journey to bring Hatter back to life. Time’s depiction is downright extraordinary and aced superbly by Sacha Baron Cohen. The blue tinge in his eyes and his animated mechanical body help him lip a fantastic creation.

“Time is a thief, and a villain.”

There are a lot of time references that have been brilliantly thought of and executed nicely. Watch out for that bit when Time is made fun of by Hatter, Cheshire Cat, Thackery, Mallymkun and the rest. The movie packs in the concept of toying with timelines, which happens to be one of my favourite fancies. Unfortunately they fail to make it palpable.


You get to hear the voice of Alan Rickman as Absolem which was endearing per se as if he sprang up back from the dead. It was ephemeral but it makes you think of him which was really pleasant. Mia Wasikowska is as outstanding as she was in the prequel. So was Helena Bonham Carter as Iracebeth. Her rampaging confidence is a joy to watch. Also, Andrew Scott has a short cameo, that was actually quite satisfying.

Screenplay is kind of a beautiful literary affair, and will keep you interested throughout. Visually it is gripping. The plot oscillates a little betwixt the real and the virtual but finds a firm grip in both the worlds. Well thought of, I must say. It isn’t really that dark and grim as Tim Burton’s style of movie-making is. But it is still fun.


The thing that seemed a little out of place in Alice Through the Looking Glass was the huge plot punch on which the whole movie was based upon. If you look at it closely you wonder Alice goes to all that trouble just to make Hatter, who is already mad, happy? Is that it? To answer that you must think from Alice’s perspective. It is this whimsical world she tries to fit in, and petty things that entail in it that matter to her the most. If one was to weave a story out of her life, it would always surround tales with such quaint things, things that matter to Alice, if not to you. Well, if you can’t digest that, a simple – “Hatter was going to die with gloom” should do it.


Alice Through the Looking Glass isn’t really that serious when trying to skip alongside the time component that it so profusely tries to milk. It will flabbergast you beyond limit, vex you if you try to connect the dots, and elude you as you try to reason with it. At the end of the flick you realize it’s Disney after all. What do you expect?

Eventually, you wonder if Alice Through the Looking Glass even came close to how Lewis had intended his book to be, but to be honest there are more creative juices at play in today’s fantasy scenario. The world is constantly growing. We improvise, don’t we?