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Eddie the Eagle Review (2016) | Never Stop Dreaming

Truly inspirational! Eddie the Eagle is an inspiring biopic about following your dreams despite the world trying to pull you down. The movie justifies all those maxims you might have come across growing up like – “Follow your dreams!”, “Never give up!” and all those perseverance clichés. But the most important one that I take out from the movie is – “Celebrate every little success”.


Looking at the bright insightful eyes of young Eddie where dreams skulked somewhere deep down, scouring persistently for his life’s true objective, your heart might end up brimming up with empathy for the poor lad. Also, looking at his gusto to settle on a dream, his constant search as he zeroes in on what he truly wants to become might leave you disappointed in yourself.

Did you once have a passion you were never able give a proper form to? Something that made you so happy, and yet you decided to listen to those who inadvertently stopped you from doing it? Well Eddie never listened to anybody but his heart, and that made all the difference.


Eddie the Eagle tries to weigh in on the biopic of the real Michael Edwards in a delightful mien. It will let you bag all the good feels as the movie goes on jumping around in them Eddie shoes. The journey starts off in a pleasant manner but there is that hurdle in the form of Terry, Eddie’s dad played by Keith Allen who constantly tries to dissuade him from doing what Eddie really loves.

“Are you trying to tell me you never had a dream when you were a kid, Dad?”

He is instantly reflective of the world, something that is trying to stop one from achieving one’s ultimate goal. Our lives are inundated with such characters who are pressing us constantly to steer from our path. It is a good thing that Terry is there in the movie and that he never approved of him that makes Eddie the Eagle further powerful as he says he loves to prove people wrong.

Eddie the Eagle struggles profusely as he tries in his own candid way to get himself the spot everybody denies him. But there was no stopping him, the perseverance he shows to achieve is worth commendable.


There are plenty of brilliant acts in the movie. A pleasant side-plot that Hugh Jackman runs is endearing to watch. Christopher Walken and Jim Broadbent cameo were lovely.

One short parley with Matti Nykänen played by Edvin Endre is downright outstanding. Beautiful lines lurk in their confab, and you can’t help but marvel at the colossal importance of it.

still of Hugh Jackman and Taron Egerton in Eddie the Eagle movie

If we do less than our best with the whole world watching, it will kill us inside.


The movie’s melodrama is a bit questionable. It doesn’t fling anything gut-wrenching at you. Hugh Jackman’s bar fight scene looks like strangely concocted in a clichéd fashion. Taron Egerton often goes in and out of his character multiple times. However does create his version of Eddie beautifully with that constant frown and that wide jaw framing.

Another thing that cannot be completely overlooked is that the beauty of the sport hasn’t been milked enough. For a guy who has set his eyes on something so huge as ski-jumping there has to be a story to it, or if there isn’t, we needed a better screenplay coming from Eddie The Eagle justifying his love for the sport. The film misses both. It goes too light for a dream so big.

Also, eventually as the movie comes to fruition it vexes the viewers into questioning whether Eddie the Eagle was crazy or completely sane. The way the movie was depicted right from the start would have you believe that he was alright but then afterwards it was kind of hard to tell.

still of Taron Egerton with the real Eddie Michael Edwards

It also, in an attempt to deliberately dodge the question of Eddie’s progress, fails to show where Eddie really stood. The fact that it’s okay to come last should have been milked more because that was actually the crux on which the movie was based. Celebrating defeating himself, his own personal record was what overjoyed him more, which I think required more screen time.

Also, there was a lot of fact changing going on that distorted the real Eddie the Eagle, Michael Edward. As Michael Edward puts it that it clicked with his life only 5% which raises brows at its accuracy.


Eddie the Eagle might not be a hero one hunts for in a movie, as he always ends up coming last, but there is a lot of heroism one could derive from him, with his free spirit, his perseverance, his attitude, and his constant pursuit for the stars.

You can check out the trailer of Eddie the Eagle here:

Legend Review (2015)

“Love is a witness.”

Tom Hardy’s “the double project” Legend rams into the average door. So what takes it down the gnawing jaws of mediocrity? The plot! Yes the plot! Wish they had thought it through before helming it.

The drama isn’t engaging at all. There is a constant upbeat score that keeps going in the background that makes sure of it. You almost know you are in for some humour and constant light-hearted melodrama. So things work until you see some serious business going on.

The biopic had a lot of potential if the story building was given a proper look-see. But unfortunately the direction takes a weird sluggish pit stop as it proceeds with the Frances-Reggie sub-plot to bring the tale to fruition. A lot of real facts in the Kray dictionary go down the toilet as John Pearson’s story tries to concentrate more on Frances and Reggie than the twin story itself.

Screenplay is good at times, however not enough to drop the anvil. You also wish the direction to be a little more engaging. You feel this sudden need for more humour, more drama and more colours into the “not so kray-onic” world of gangsters. When the movie gets over, you instantly feel the void all the aforementioned absent elements leave you with.

The only reason you should watch this movie for is Tom Hardy. Watch him turn into something else yet again. This time he gets to play two of ‘em in a single flick. Both his personalities are very different from each other. He wears two different voices (one’s a monotone where he chews on his words mostly) quite gorgeously. You will marvel at his walk, the way he talks and reacts to a situation. It is both ballsy and reckless at the same time.


In the movie Legend, the chemistry between Frances and Reggie was terribly missing. Wished Tom Hardy’s Reggie to be a more feeling kind. His acting at other junctures is simply outstanding though. Like when we get a glimpse of his rad provoked anger at a badass moment when he stabs the hell out of Jack McVitie. It was probably the most memorable thing in the entire movie. That and the fight between the twins which was quite hilarious and emotional at the same time.

Go watch Legend if you wish to have a little glimpse into the history of the Krays and the London mafia scene back then. That and if you are a Hardy boy!

Kingsman: The Secret Service Review (2014)

Kingsman is exhilarating!

What does a spy movie need? Eye-popping gore, ridiculous concepts, shreds of humour and some ballsy action sequences. Add a suit to it, and you have got yourself some classic JB stuff. But it ain’t James Bond. Kinda more like Jack Bauer! 😉

Matthew Vaughn hardly disappoints. He is a man of KickAss taste (see what I did there?)  He literally survives on theatrics. Take any of Vaughn’s work and you know he has this unique way of film-making that sways around with the actors, occasionally jumps at them for emphasis, and stays till the animation hangs around. Also, if Vaughn gets serious behind the camera, you just know how his work becomes grim all of a sudden. First Class reference intended! Fortunately we see everything in this movie.

You have a concept, even though how clichéd it might sound, that breathes on Vaughn’s pizzazz, which is seriously taken up with Firth’s splendor and well supported by Taron Egerton’s audacity. To fill in the voids you have Mark Strong to the rescue, whose facial expressions are enough to tell shit’s getting serious. Samuel steps up to fill in the boots of villainy with a lisp. He isn’t dangerous exactly but yes he wears a brainiac-head with an idea so hideous that takes care of the world’s population per se.

There are some ridiculous and uncanny bits in the movie but they are all passable because of this explosive entertainment package that we are shot in the head with. Also, primarily because it is a comic adaptation so I would suggest just go with it. Sit back and enjoy the theatrics. Get on a joy ride that would take you to the rails of awesomeness with bursting heads, popping eyes, plucked hands, flying prosthetics, split bodies and a cute little pug. Whoa! Quite a descent!

The finest part of the flick: Watch out for that church massacre! Amen to that! 😉