“It is a land of wolves now.”

The aforementioned escapes the roaring gasps of Benicio Del Toro as he slips in an advice to Emily Blunt. Sicario is a thrilling ride into the US-Mexican ongoing drug war, where the story takes you into the deep waters of perversion, vengeance and corruption. Mexico reeks of death. The drug has polluted its air.

Denis Villeneuve has a knack for helming beauties. Sicario is yet another product of his extraordinary brain. What I love most about Denis’ direction is the fact that his frames carry the perfect amount of profundity. They are thought provoking, and give you ample amount of time to feel the thrill. You are able to focus properly and contemplate between his lingering frames.

Brilliant top scenic views that blend in with the gorgeous Johann Johannson music, deafening helicopter shots, or the silhouette of the private jet over a barren land depicting the long exhausting travel, carry Denis’ suggestive flair.

The acting department is literally thriving with exceptional performances by the movie’s stellar cast. The screenplay too is very well written, taking the crime genre into account.


One of the most gorgeous bits of the movie is when Emily Blunt is shown “the fireworks” – a city breathing on tragedy, bleeding with death, and burning in fire. The unfolding of the main Sicario was one helluva twist to the tale that was written beautifully by Taylor Sheridan.

Another thing that I loved was Hernandez’s character Silvio. A dispensable soul who was manifested subtly by Denis. Like any other Mexican, he was a guy with fingers in dirt. Oblivious to what was coming, with a prepared family. Denis shows such a way of living is common in Mexico. How they have accepted death as a way of life!

The movie ends quite dramatically as it leaves Kate Macer with a choice, the choice to shoot a Sicario like Alejandro and do the right thing, or let him breathe and let the city smother itself in the flames of vengeance. As the final bits rush in showing the Silvio’s death aftermath, we see his son trying to play football, his mother trying to cheer him when we hear bullets in the backdrop. Their world stops to heed at the distraction, but then again, they have accepted it to be a part of living, and they still continue. It is an extremely poetic bit that makes you pity their lives.














            • Exceptional direction
            • Outstanding plot
            • Brilliant screenplay
            • Top-notch score
            • Great depiction of US Mexico drug War


            • Could have used some editing

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