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Tag: Steven Spielberg

The BFG Review (2016) | Bringing Dahl’s the Big Friendly Giant to life

Alluring! If there is someone who can come close to doing The BFG justice, it is none other than Steven Spielberg himself. He nails it and creates this enchanting image of the giant that we had always marveled about as kids. Spielberg brings him to life with his astounding powerful direction well supported constantly by the flick’s beautiful CGI.

MARK RYLANCE: THE PERFECT BIG FRIENDLY GIANT

Mark Rylance is absolutely outstanding as the Big Friendly Giant, wearing his benevolence on his sleeves for us to notice him. He has such a beautiful soul that you cannot imagine anyone else wearing the character so perfectly. He fits into the persona like a glove. You can’t help feel sorry for him when he struggles with the words. Yet in his occasional balderlash, he manages to say things that generate effortless musings.

still of mark rylance as the big friendly giant from the bfg movie

I hears your lonely heart, in all the secret whisperings of the world.

If you pay close attention to his demeanour and follow him up with a childish gaze, it would be hard not to fall in love with his goodwill. Spielberg’s CGI manages to capture his every expression making every moment melting.

OTHER NOTEWORTHY ASPECTS IN THE BFG

Screenplay is brimming up with Roald Dahl genius, and well moulded by Melissa Mathison for Cinema. Beautiful words from the book still lurk there, and they manage to rivet you with the kind of pace Steven Spielberg and all of us love.

It was the Witching Hour, when the Boogeyman comes out when people go missing. The girls say the Witching Hour arrives at midnight. I think it comes at three in the morning, when I’m the only one awake. Like always. Like now.

still of Ruby Barnhill as Sophie in the BFG
Ruby Barnhill was a great choice for Sophie too. Her cuteness level is endearing to watch. Her conversations with the BFG is what helps in putting things into perspective.

The score of BFG is equally enchanting; setting the right mien to let you experience the wonder. The artistry on dreams was stunning as well. The whole concept of catching a dream, creating it, blowing it, is so well thought of that you cannot clap enough for Dahl’s creativity.

Watch the Giant storm past the trees swiftly and you will see how gorgeously his movements have been captured. The time when Sophie is picked up from her bed, as she beholds the dodgy pathway through her blankets, will tell you how Steven Spielberg never fails to give painstaking attention to his frames. He lets us in on Sophie’s vision to show what she sees. There is poetry lurking in his direction which makes the whole cinematography affair even more winsome.

THE FINAL VERDICT

Apart from changing little facts from the Roald Dahl’s creation, Spielberg brings back the lost charm of his ingenuity to the front page. He makes it happening via the tranquility in his frames something only his finesse could ace.

Whilst those who haven’t come across the children’s book before, they might find the story a bit fantastical, but to be really candid, you need to turn back time for this. Witness the movie through the eyes of a little girl who comes across Giants for the first time in her life and goes on a whimsical little adventure to the Giant Country.

Check out the trailer of The BFG movie here:

Bridge of Spies Review (2015)

Brige of Spies is an exquisite political biopic!

Steven Spielberg comes up with a biography of a guy caught up in the jaws of political torture as he endeavours to negotiate the rescuing of two people in a cold war struck world. However, the movie isn’t limited to that. There are melodramatic bits strewn all across in the gravy of one helluva screenplay which is brilliantly topped by a stellar cast.

Bridge of Spies is an exceptional movie that has been helmed slowly, delicately and powerfully. There was a war going on, a colder one: a constant mental war of superiority between the two superpowers on the globe. In a twisted world like that, Rudolf Abel, a Soviet spy ends up becoming a victim to the US-Russia distress claws. To save his ass, a lawyer by profession, James B. Donovan, played marvellously by Tom Hanks, is hired with hopes of giving a fair trial yet a subdued one to cover up the hoopla. What ignites as an unfair trial gradually tangles him up further into an even bigger commotion wherein CIA approaches Donovan to make a barter of Abel for a fellow American spy pilot caught in Russia.

Scaling back a bit further, the thing that might strike you as a pleasant surprise is its beginning. We witness an old guy painting himself with the aid of a mirror. His acts are quite mundane, natural and harmless. Spielberg spends enough time on the character for us to relate to him, a normal guy who loves to paint, who is calm and couldn’t possibly mean trouble. On the contrary, we see a troupe of psyched CIA crowd bent on catching him. They bag him at an odd hour and bring chaos to his house, breaking all hell lose, without a search warrant. That’s where Donovan comes in with his propositions. But unfortunately chaos swallows him up. It becomes James v/s America, as every guy starts hating him for fighting a case for the Russian spy.

What was also great to watch was how people change their perspective. At one point it was manifested how the world leered at James when he was defending Abel, but then at a later stage when he saves two Americans, all that hatred ends up metamorphosing into sheer love.

Mark Rylance is outstanding as Rudolf Abel. At times his expressionless face belies his indifference towards the political muck he ends up in. Even when he is aware of an imminent danger, serenity rarely leaves him. He carries his knack for painting and wears it even at direst moments. For example, he calmly answers, “Would it help?” when asked “Are you not worried?” One of the most brilliant scenes in the movie is when Abel compares Donovan to ‘The Standing Man’ in his story. The music grows suddenly and imparts extra gravity to the bit.

It is always a delight to watch Tom Hanks act. His face carries the right kind of emotions. Always lost in thought, he makes Bridge of Spies a dramatic hoot. There are top-notch dramatic frames that Spielberg slides in for emphasis. Like the one where Donovan’s son gets influenced by a war video, and fills up his tub with water for safety. It is a sad reflection of how war changes everything. Also, at one point Donovan had the misfortune of witnessing people being fired at whilst trying to sneak through the border. At a later stage, James sees children leaping over fences, which reminds him of the same troubled scene which then again throws him into the pits of gloom.

What is a tad sad is how long the movie runs. The movie could have survived some cuts. There are frames that we could have lived without. However, it is comprehensible and justified to show crucial bits of the horror and mental torture Donovan had to go through in order to get the job done. When he returns home in the end, he dozes off at once owing to exhaustion whilst in the backdrop his family gets to know his greatness. Quite endearing to watch actually!

A highly recommended movie.

Jurassic World Review (2015)

Jurassic World gives you the nostalgic jitters. Colin Trevorrow is no Spielberg. Yet he tries to nail an awesome project into the right groove. Jurassic World is a constantly entertaining, at times dramatic, thrilling joyride into the lost dino theme. We are introduced to the most dreadful, villainous and invincible creatures of all times, Indominus Rex, the hybrid that manifests multiple traits. She is relentless, aggressive, highly intelligent and untamable and she kills for sport. Things look pretty bad right there, huh! Wait till you see the other pack of dinos that Jurassic World hatches.

The story of the movie is technically quite similar to the originals however it races in as a sequel to them. The plot is a little bit predictable but Trevorrow manages to unfurl it gorgeously at the right dire moments.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

Dinosaurs are living things. They can communicate, understand each other, work as a team to topple the bad and avenge! Jurassic World runs on this very theme. It also exalts the brave, with Chris Pratt doing us the honours under the skin of Owen Grady, a relentless bad-ass who would do anything to save lives. A messed-up Claire played by Bryce Dallas Howard who thinks these animals are mere assets that don’t feel a thing, however has a change of heart at a later stage when she sympathizes with one. Two kids who are on their holiday to explore the park and a lot of tourists who are there just for fun. Irrfan Khan does a brilliant job as Masrani with his engaged acting. Vincent D’Onofrio too does a fine job with his character trying to milk opportunities. BD Wong has a short but powerful cameo and reprises his role as Dr. Henry Wu.

There are many Easter eggs in the flick that would throw you into the pits of nostalgia. Many references are made to Hammond and his mistakes, a revisit to the previous Jurassic Park place, the aviary aftermath with Pteranodons, ruthless Velociraptors, the red burning flare, the unflinching T-Rex and the deafening triumphant growl of the Rex everything simply takes you back in time.

Screenplay is well written if we concentrate only the first half of the movie. There are brilliant conversations between Masrani, Wu, Hoskins and Owen that pack in the dramatic quotient to the flick.

The movie however fails to revive the fear that all its prequels breathed on. Nobody is really afraid of dinosaurs. With Pratt doing ballsy stuff, you suddenly aren’t afraid of dinosaurs. Next thing you know even Claire goes on to summon a frigging T-Rex with a flare. We used to pee our pants with a Velociraptor around, and they are literally dancing with the dinos! Kids in the movie too don’t have much to do in the climactic scenes. Nature plays survival of the fittest once again and humans become mere spectators of destruction. In the end it boils down to teamwork and overpowering your killer instinct like valued lessons for humans which become a little indigestible.

After the attack of the Pterosaurs, the movie tries to dive into the dark from where things become a little shoddy. Editing goes a little poor there considering the classic frame cuts in the first half. Profundity in the characters of Claire and Owen loses its charm, and suddenly Owen is open for some Hoskins change. Claire’s change of heart has no gravity or a backdrop screenplay to nail the effect. There is no scientific rendezvous unlike its prequel. Also, sometimes you wish the family drama to be a bit engaging. Some flaws pop up too but apart from these little things the movie is a complete entertaining package into the past.

Watch and reminisce!

Poltergeist Review (2015)

Poltergeist is the worst horror flick of the decade!

While there are exceptional directors like David Robert Mitchell (It Follows), The Conjuring (James Wan) and Jennifer Kent (The Babadook) offering us out-of-the world horror movies in a platter of terror blended with high quality direction, there stands Gil Kenan crapping all over its concept, doing the exact opposite.

If Poltergeist was supposed to be a reboot, then Gil missed the target by a light year. If not, he still failed to make a good movie by another light year. What is sad is the fact that its direction simply takes everything with it into the netherworld. Its stupidity swallows great actors like Sam Rockwell, Jared Harris and Rosemarie DeWitt, and makes them look mediocre.

There are so many instances in the movie that would compel you to go, “Really?” and “Is this for real?” and sometimes “Where is everybody?” The horror isn’t given enough time to sieve in and it keeps trudging on your head like a pointless parade with no direction or meaning.

If I try really hard to look on the bright side, I could only remember the cute little Kennedi Clements who manages to melt you with her sweet voice and cute acts. She is downright adorable. Amongst other things, you could say the graphics and visuals looked rad particularly when the cast witnesses the creepy diabolical world that homes in their closet. Apart from that I think everything was sheer pathetic.

One of the wisest decisions of your life would be to skip this one!